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1110529
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Circuses: Animal Welfare more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to maintain the welfare of the wild animals touring with travelling circuses in the event that the Welfare of Wild Animals in Travelling Circuses (England) Regulations 2012 expire before a ban on the use of such animals in circuses is in place. more like this
tabling member constituency Strangford more like this
tabling member printed
Jim Shannon more like this
uin 242837 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-15more like thismore than 2019-04-15
answer text <p>I refer the hon. Member to the reply given to the hon. Member for Oxford and West Abingdon, Layla Moran, on 16 October 2018 to PQ 176633.</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-10-08/176633" target="_blank">https://www.parliament.uk/business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2018-10-08/176633</a></p> more like this
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
question first answered
less than 2019-04-15T12:57:02.187Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-15T12:57:02.187Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
4131
label Biography information for Jim Shannon more like this
1110643
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Eggs: Labelling more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of best before dates on eggs. more like this
tabling member constituency Coventry South more like this
tabling member printed
Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
uin 242685 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-15more like thismore than 2019-04-15
answer text <p>Regulation (EC) No 589/2008, which lays down marketing standards for eggs, requires raw, shell eggs to be marked with a best before date which should be no more than 28 days after laying. Regulation (EC) No 853/2004, which lays down specific hygiene rules for food of animal origin, requires eggs to be sold within 21 days of laying.</p><p> </p><p>‘Best before’ is used on most foods, to indicate that the quality of the food may not be at its best after that date has expired. It is not an indication of safety and, where safe to do so, food may continue to be sold and used after this date. Good use of these indications, in line with recent Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) guidance, will ensure that consumers will be able to make the best use of food and reduce waste.</p><p> </p><p>Food labelling will be reviewed following EU Exit to ensure continued consumer confidence in the food they buy.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
question first answered
less than 2019-04-15T15:39:44.01Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-15T15:39:44.01Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
308
label Biography information for Mr Jim Cunningham more like this
1110786
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Dangerous Dogs more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many cats were attacked by dogs in each of the last three years. more like this
tabling member constituency Alyn and Deeside more like this
tabling member printed
Mark Tami more like this
uin 242722 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-16more like thismore than 2019-04-16
answer text <p>The Government is serious about tackling irresponsible ownership of dogs, which is why Defra is funding research being carried out by Middlesex University to gain a better understanding of the reasons for dog aggression, whether this is towards people or other animals, such as cats. We expect to have the findings of the research by the end of the year.</p><p> </p><p>In the Government’s response to the EFRA Select Committee report on controlling dangerous dogs, we committed to a plan of action with stakeholders on the most effective way to reach children across the country to help promote responsible dog ownership from an early age. We are taking this work forward in the context of the findings from the research project.</p><p> </p><p>Defra has provided local authorities and police with guidance in relation to the controls on dangerous dogs. This guidance is available on GOV.UK and the Local Government Association website in addition to the publication “Dangerous Dogs Law: Guidance for Enforcers”, which is available on GOV.UK. There are no central records of the number of dog attacks on cats.</p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN
242723 more like this
242724 more like this
242725 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-16T13:39:28.913Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-16T13:39:28.913Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
1383
label Biography information for Mark Tami more like this
1110787
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Dangerous Dogs more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what guidance his Department has provided to local authorities to prevent dog attacks on cats. more like this
tabling member constituency Alyn and Deeside more like this
tabling member printed
Mark Tami more like this
uin 242723 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-16more like thismore than 2019-04-16
answer text <p>The Government is serious about tackling irresponsible ownership of dogs, which is why Defra is funding research being carried out by Middlesex University to gain a better understanding of the reasons for dog aggression, whether this is towards people or other animals, such as cats. We expect to have the findings of the research by the end of the year.</p><p> </p><p>In the Government’s response to the EFRA Select Committee report on controlling dangerous dogs, we committed to a plan of action with stakeholders on the most effective way to reach children across the country to help promote responsible dog ownership from an early age. We are taking this work forward in the context of the findings from the research project.</p><p> </p><p>Defra has provided local authorities and police with guidance in relation to the controls on dangerous dogs. This guidance is available on GOV.UK and the Local Government Association website in addition to the publication “Dangerous Dogs Law: Guidance for Enforcers”, which is available on GOV.UK. There are no central records of the number of dog attacks on cats.</p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN
242722 more like this
242724 more like this
242725 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-16T13:39:28.99Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-16T13:39:28.99Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
1383
label Biography information for Mark Tami more like this
1110788
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Dangerous Dogs more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what his Department is proposing to do to reduce the number of dog attacks on cats. more like this
tabling member constituency Alyn and Deeside more like this
tabling member printed
Mark Tami more like this
uin 242724 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-16more like thismore than 2019-04-16
answer text <p>The Government is serious about tackling irresponsible ownership of dogs, which is why Defra is funding research being carried out by Middlesex University to gain a better understanding of the reasons for dog aggression, whether this is towards people or other animals, such as cats. We expect to have the findings of the research by the end of the year.</p><p> </p><p>In the Government’s response to the EFRA Select Committee report on controlling dangerous dogs, we committed to a plan of action with stakeholders on the most effective way to reach children across the country to help promote responsible dog ownership from an early age. We are taking this work forward in the context of the findings from the research project.</p><p> </p><p>Defra has provided local authorities and police with guidance in relation to the controls on dangerous dogs. This guidance is available on GOV.UK and the Local Government Association website in addition to the publication “Dangerous Dogs Law: Guidance for Enforcers”, which is available on GOV.UK. There are no central records of the number of dog attacks on cats.</p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN
242722 more like this
242723 more like this
242725 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-16T13:39:29.027Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-16T13:39:29.027Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
1383
label Biography information for Mark Tami more like this
1110789
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Dangerous Dogs more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department will be working with the Department for Education to develop a plan of action to introduce education in schools promoting responsible dog ownership and preventing dog attacks on cats and other animals. more like this
tabling member constituency Alyn and Deeside more like this
tabling member printed
Mark Tami more like this
uin 242725 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-16more like thismore than 2019-04-16
answer text <p>The Government is serious about tackling irresponsible ownership of dogs, which is why Defra is funding research being carried out by Middlesex University to gain a better understanding of the reasons for dog aggression, whether this is towards people or other animals, such as cats. We expect to have the findings of the research by the end of the year.</p><p> </p><p>In the Government’s response to the EFRA Select Committee report on controlling dangerous dogs, we committed to a plan of action with stakeholders on the most effective way to reach children across the country to help promote responsible dog ownership from an early age. We are taking this work forward in the context of the findings from the research project.</p><p> </p><p>Defra has provided local authorities and police with guidance in relation to the controls on dangerous dogs. This guidance is available on GOV.UK and the Local Government Association website in addition to the publication “Dangerous Dogs Law: Guidance for Enforcers”, which is available on GOV.UK. There are no central records of the number of dog attacks on cats.</p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN
242722 more like this
242723 more like this
242724 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-16T13:39:29.107Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-16T13:39:29.107Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
1383
label Biography information for Mark Tami more like this
1110824
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Food: Prices more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency plans the Government has in place to support vulnerable people in the event food prices rise significantly in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal; and if he will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 242750 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-16more like thismore than 2019-04-16
answer text <p>The UK has a high degree of food security, built on access to a range of sources including strong domestic production and imports from other countries. This will continue to be the case when we leave the EU, with or without a deal. The size and diversity of the industry is a key factor in enabling the food sector to remain resilient to food supply chain disruptions.</p><p>The Government has well established ways of working with the food industry to minimise potential disruption. This includes working with Defra’s long established Food Chain Emergency Liaison Group (FCELG), which allows Government and industry to work together to plan for and respond to any food supply disruption. This industry group’s membership is drawn from across the agri-food chain sector and includes other relevant government departments, Devolved Administrations and agencies.</p><p> </p><p>On food prices, we have observed that the most important drivers of change in the cost of food are global food commodity prices, exchange rates and oil prices. This will continue to be the case once the UK has left the EU.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN 242751 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-16T15:20:01.03Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-16T15:20:01.03Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
1110826
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Food Supply more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to (a) minimise food disruption and (b) consider the possible effects food shortages could have on vulnerable groups in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal; and if he will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 242751 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-16more like thismore than 2019-04-16
answer text <p>The UK has a high degree of food security, built on access to a range of sources including strong domestic production and imports from other countries. This will continue to be the case when we leave the EU, with or without a deal. The size and diversity of the industry is a key factor in enabling the food sector to remain resilient to food supply chain disruptions.</p><p>The Government has well established ways of working with the food industry to minimise potential disruption. This includes working with Defra’s long established Food Chain Emergency Liaison Group (FCELG), which allows Government and industry to work together to plan for and respond to any food supply disruption. This industry group’s membership is drawn from across the agri-food chain sector and includes other relevant government departments, Devolved Administrations and agencies.</p><p> </p><p>On food prices, we have observed that the most important drivers of change in the cost of food are global food commodity prices, exchange rates and oil prices. This will continue to be the case once the UK has left the EU.</p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN 242750 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-16T15:20:01.077Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-16T15:20:01.077Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
1110890
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Dangerous Dogs more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what measures he is considering to protect livestock from dogs that are being exercised in the countryside on farmland. more like this
tabling member constituency East Worthing and Shoreham more like this
tabling member printed
Tim Loughton more like this
uin 242655 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-15more like thismore than 2019-04-15
answer text <p>There is a range of measures available to the police and local authorities to prevent or respond to dog attacks on livestock. The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 makes it an offence to allow a dog to be dangerously out of control and this includes in and around livestock. In addition, the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 makes it an offence to allow a dog to worry livestock. The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 includes specific powers for police and local authorities to take action before a dog becomes dangerously out of control by issuing a warning notice for low level dog related nuisance. The table below provides the number of people prosecuted under the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 for allowing dogs to worry all types of livestock, including sheep, in the last five years for which figures are available. Prosecutions have been made under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 but data is not centrally held on the circumstances of how the dog was dangerously out of control.</p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953</strong> <strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2014</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2015</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2016</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2017</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Grand Total</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Prosecuted</strong></p></td><td><p>50</p></td><td><p>51</p></td><td><p>47</p></td><td><p>47</p></td><td><p>37</p></td><td><p>232</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN
242656 more like this
242657 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-15T15:46:26.327Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-15T15:46:26.327Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
114
label Biography information for Tim Loughton more like this
1110891
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept id 13 more like this
answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
hansard heading Dangerous Dogs more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many sheep have been killed by domestic dogs on farmland in England in each of the last five years. more like this
tabling member constituency East Worthing and Shoreham more like this
tabling member printed
Tim Loughton more like this
uin 242656 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2019-04-15more like thismore than 2019-04-15
answer text <p>There is a range of measures available to the police and local authorities to prevent or respond to dog attacks on livestock. The Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 makes it an offence to allow a dog to be dangerously out of control and this includes in and around livestock. In addition, the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 makes it an offence to allow a dog to worry livestock. The Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 includes specific powers for police and local authorities to take action before a dog becomes dangerously out of control by issuing a warning notice for low level dog related nuisance. The table below provides the number of people prosecuted under the Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953 for allowing dogs to worry all types of livestock, including sheep, in the last five years for which figures are available. Prosecutions have been made under the Dangerous Dogs Act 1991 but data is not centrally held on the circumstances of how the dog was dangerously out of control.</p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Dogs (Protection of Livestock) Act 1953</strong> <strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2013</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2014</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2015</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2016</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>2017</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Grand Total</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Prosecuted</strong></p></td><td><p>50</p></td><td><p>51</p></td><td><p>47</p></td><td><p>47</p></td><td><p>37</p></td><td><p>232</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
answering member printed David Rutley remove filter
grouped question UIN
242655 more like this
242657 more like this
question first answered
less than 2019-04-15T15:46:26.377Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-15T15:46:26.377Z
answering member
4033
label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
tabling member
114
label Biography information for Tim Loughton more like this