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390405
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-15more like thismore than 2015-07-15
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Catering more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how many staff in catering outlets on the Parliamentary Estate are employed on zero-hour contracts. more like this
tabling member constituency Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough more like this
tabling member printed
Harry Harpham more like this
uin 7241 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
answer text <p>The House of Commons does not offer new members of staff zero-hours contracts, and guarantees work for all its employees. There are two members of staff currently working under casual contracts in Catering Services, whose appointments pre-date this policy. They have been offered, but have declined, guaranteed hours employment contracts.</p><p>The arrangements in the House of Lords are a matter for the Administration of that House.</p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T15:45:57.697Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T15:45:57.697Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4477
label Biography information for Harry Harpham more like this
390406
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-15more like thismore than 2015-07-15
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Catering more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, whether tips paid by credit or debit cards in catering outlets on the Parliamentary Estate are passed on to staff in addition to their wages. more like this
tabling member constituency Sheffield, Brightside and Hillsborough more like this
tabling member printed
Harry Harpham more like this
uin 7242 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
answer text <p>Tips paid by debit and credit cards are passed on to permanent front-of-house catering staff in addition to their wages.</p><p> </p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T15:46:27.187Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T15:46:27.187Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4477
label Biography information for Harry Harpham more like this
390407
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-15more like thismore than 2015-07-15
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Divisions: Technology more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what electronic upgrades to the recording of divisions in the House (a) have been made since 2010 and (b) are under preparation in connection with proposed changes to the standing orders on English votes on English laws. more like this
tabling member constituency Aberdeen North more like this
tabling member printed
Kirsty Blackman more like this
uin 7244 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
answer text <p>Accurate recording of divisions and timely publication of division lists are critical business activities of the House of Commons.</p><p> </p><p>The House Service has been investigating means of electronic recording of divisions since October 2014, with a view to improving the timely publication of division lists, making division data more accessible to the public and easier to analyse, and improving accuracy. The House of Lords recently moved to recording divisions on tablet devices.</p><p> </p><p>A trial was held in the House in March 2015 in which seven divisions were recorded in part by division clerks on tablet devices.</p><p> </p><p>Full implementation of tablet recording of divisions is expected to take place later in the current Session. This change had been planned before the announcement of the Government’s proposals for English votes for English laws, although the use of tablets would make it easier and quicker to provide the results of divisions taken under the proposed ‘double-majority’ system.</p><p> </p><p>In 2013/14 the amount spent on electronic upgrades to the recording of divisions was zero.</p><p> </p><p>In 2014/15, the amount spent on electronic upgrades to the recording of divisions was £9,900. This included £5,000 for the cost of developing software and £4,900 for purchasing the tablet devices referred to above.</p><p> </p><p>The work on the project is not yet complete, but the total amount spent to date in 2015/16 is £6,700. This includes £5,000 for purchasing tablet devices and £1,700 to modify the software to enable the tablets to provide the results of divisions taken under the proposed ‘double-majority’ system.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN 7245 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T15:48:23.937Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T15:48:23.937Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4357
label Biography information for Kirsty Blackman more like this
390408
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-15more like thismore than 2015-07-15
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Divisions: Technology more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how much has been spent on electronic upgrades to the recording of divisions in the House in each of the last two financial years. more like this
tabling member constituency Aberdeen North more like this
tabling member printed
Kirsty Blackman more like this
uin 7245 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
answer text <p>Accurate recording of divisions and timely publication of division lists are critical business activities of the House of Commons.</p><p> </p><p>The House Service has been investigating means of electronic recording of divisions since October 2014, with a view to improving the timely publication of division lists, making division data more accessible to the public and easier to analyse, and improving accuracy. The House of Lords recently moved to recording divisions on tablet devices.</p><p> </p><p>A trial was held in the House in March 2015 in which seven divisions were recorded in part by division clerks on tablet devices.</p><p> </p><p>Full implementation of tablet recording of divisions is expected to take place later in the current Session. This change had been planned before the announcement of the Government’s proposals for English votes for English laws, although the use of tablets would make it easier and quicker to provide the results of divisions taken under the proposed ‘double-majority’ system.</p><p> </p><p>In 2013/14 the amount spent on electronic upgrades to the recording of divisions was zero.</p><p> </p><p>In 2014/15, the amount spent on electronic upgrades to the recording of divisions was £9,900. This included £5,000 for the cost of developing software and £4,900 for purchasing the tablet devices referred to above.</p><p> </p><p>The work on the project is not yet complete, but the total amount spent to date in 2015/16 is £6,700. This includes £5,000 for purchasing tablet devices and £1,700 to modify the software to enable the tablets to provide the results of divisions taken under the proposed ‘double-majority’ system.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN 7244 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T15:48:24.02Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T15:48:24.02Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4357
label Biography information for Kirsty Blackman more like this
390837
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-16more like thismore than 2015-07-16
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Divisions: Technology more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate he has made of the change in the cost of electronic upgrades for recording divisions arising from proposed changes to Standing Orders on English votes on English laws. more like this
tabling member constituency Aberdeen North more like this
tabling member printed
Kirsty Blackman more like this
uin 7760 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-21more like thismore than 2015-07-21
answer text <p>I refer the hon. Member to my answer yesterday to Questions 7244 and 7245.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-21T09:19:26.687Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-21T09:19:26.687Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4357
label Biography information for Kirsty Blackman more like this
390838
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-16more like thismore than 2015-07-16
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Select Committees: Technology more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what progress has been made on developing device independent applications for the distribution of select committee papers. more like this
tabling member constituency Newcastle upon Tyne Central more like this
tabling member printed
Chi Onwurah more like this
uin 7713 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-21more like thismore than 2015-07-21
answer text <p>Documents for select committees are circulated to committee members electronically, predominantly in PDF format; a format that can be read on a number of different devices. Following the decision of the House of Commons Commission, 557 Members have been issued with an iPad. Support for the system of distributing papers has focused mainly on the needs of iPad users, including software to allow the synching and personal annotation of documents. Members are not restricted to using iPads and can access the folders used for distributing committee documents on a desktop or laptop computer and, if they wish, copy them onto a tablet device of their choice. Alternative methods of distributing papers are being investigated and the Liaison Committee will be consulted to ensure that the views of Members are taken into account. Device independence remains a key requirement.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-21T10:50:37.53Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-21T10:50:37.53Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4124
label Biography information for Chi Onwurah more like this
390839
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-16more like thismore than 2015-07-16
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Uniforms more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, if the Commission will take steps to allow door-keeping staff a summer uniform made from lighter materials to reduce discomfort in hot weather. more like this
tabling member constituency Coatbridge, Chryston and Bellshill more like this
tabling member printed
Phil Boswell more like this
uin 7716 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-07-21more like thismore than 2015-07-21
answer text <p>Doorkeeping staff who perform a variety of outside and inside duties have a range of uniforms to wear as appropriate. Senior Doorkeepers who exclusively perform inside duties, and predominantly around the Chamber (which has cooling), have one uniform. These uniforms are 'bespoke' and to provide a second uniform would have considerable resource implications. The Serjeant at Arms has not received any requests from the Doorkeeping staff to either create a summer version of the uniform or to 'dress down' during hotter weather.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-07-21T09:20:06.117Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-21T09:20:06.117Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4388
label Biography information for Philip Boswell more like this
391513
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Hearing Aids more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 22 June 2015 to Question 2662, if he will extend the provision of the induction loop system to ensure people who have hearing loss or who are deaf can follow proceedings in all meeting rooms using a personal loop inducted into that system. more like this
tabling member constituency Walsall North more like this
tabling member printed
Mr David Winnick more like this
uin 7923 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-07more like thismore than 2015-09-07
answer text <p>Following the hon. Member’s questions of 15 and 22 June, officials in the Department of Facilities have worked with the House of Commons audio-visual (AV) contractor to establish the costs and viability of extending the existing infra-red loop system to those meeting rooms on the Estate that do not currently have this facility. The work to install this facility in an additional twenty-one rooms across the Estate is planned to take place during the Conference Recess and be in place when the House returns in October.<br><br>An additional twenty-one rooms will be fitted with the infra-red loop system at a cost of approximately £31k. The rooms concerned are:</p><ul><li>Portcullis House : Rooms M,N,O,P,Q,R,S,T and U</li><li>Norman Shaw North: Ground Floor Interview Room</li><li>Parliament St: Rooms A,B,C and D</li><li>Millbank House: Archbishop’s Room</li><li>7 Millbank: Conference Room E and Room 11</li><li>The Palace of Westminster: Conference Room H</li><li>Tothill St: Rooms G01, G02 and G03</li></ul><p> </p><p> </p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-07T14:09:40.503Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-07T14:09:40.503Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
316
label Biography information for Mr David Winnick more like this
391864
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-21more like thismore than 2015-07-21
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Palace of Westminster more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, whether options other than remaining in the Palace of Westminster have been considered for the long-term future of the House. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh North and Leith more like this
tabling member printed
Deidre Brock more like this
uin 8344 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-07more like thismore than 2015-09-07
answer text <p>An option to move Parliament out of the Palace of Westminster to a new purpose-built building was included in the Restoration and Renewal Pre-Feasibility Study of 2012. The House of Commons Commission reviewed that study on 29 October 2012. It decided to rule out the option of constructing a new building away from Westminster and agreed that no further analysis would be undertaken on this option. The House Committee of the House of Lords took a similar view.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-07T14:10:32.833Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-07T14:10:32.833Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4417
label Biography information for Deidre Brock more like this
391865
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-07-21more like thismore than 2015-07-21
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons Chamber more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the Rt. Hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, whether consideration has been given to ensuring that there will be adequate provision for every hon. Member to attend proceedings and take part in proceedings in the Chamber following the restoration and renewal of the Palace of Westminster. more like this
tabling member constituency Edinburgh North and Leith more like this
tabling member printed
Deidre Brock more like this
uin 8348 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-07more like thismore than 2015-09-07
answer text <p>The two Houses have established a Joint Committee on the Palace of Westminster which will report and make recommendations to both Houses on the future restoration and renewal of the Palace. It will be for the two Houses to decide in due course whether or not they wish to make changes to the layout and seating arrangements of their respective Chambers in conjunction with the essential replacement of service infrastructure and other repairs to the fabric of the building. I am sure that the Joint Committee will be happy to receive the hon. Lady's ideas on this subject.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-07T14:11:20.277Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-07T14:11:20.277Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4417
label Biography information for Deidre Brock more like this
416521
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-04more like thismore than 2015-09-04
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Electronic Voting more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to his oral statement of 2 July 2015, on English Votes on English Laws, Official Report, column 1646, what tender process was undertaken when deciding which electronic devices would be used by hon. Members for English and Welsh constituencies when casting their votes on pieces of legislation certified as being England or Wales only. more like this
tabling member constituency Alyn and Deeside more like this
tabling member printed
Mark Tami more like this
uin 8688 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-11more like thismore than 2015-09-11
answer text <p>The House Service has been investigating means of electronic recording of divisions since October 2014. A trial was held in the House in March 2015 in which seven divisions were recorded in part by division clerks on two tablet devices. Those two devices had been purchased in February 2015 and a further four devices were purchased in May, in preparation for the next phase of the project. The devices chosen, for the use of House officials administering divisions, rather than hon. Members, had recently been added to the equipment catalogue for Members, so met Parliament’s requirements in terms of security, screen size and technical compatibility. They were purchased from a supplier on the Sprint procurement framework.</p><p>Full implementation of tablet recording of divisions is expected to take place later in the current Session. This change had been planned before the announcement of the Government’s proposals for English votes for English laws, although the use of tablets would make it easier and quicker to provide the results of divisions taken under the proposed ‘double-majority’ system.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-11T12:07:56.247Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-11T12:07:56.247Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1383
label Biography information for Mark Tami more like this
417708
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-08more like thismore than 2015-09-08
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Working Hours more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what (a) overtime and (b) flexible working arrangements are in place for clerking, catering, security, Hansard and other ancillary or support staff and officers of the House during late sittings of the House. more like this
tabling member constituency Glasgow North more like this
tabling member printed
Patrick Grady more like this
uin 9407 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-14more like thismore than 2015-09-14
answer text <p>The House of Commons terms and conditions of employment include provision to compensate staff for working late and/or additional hours during late sittings of the House.</p><p> </p><p>Staff in pay bands A–E (and some senior staff) required to work until the rise of the House or beyond are paid an Unsocial Hours Payment (UHP) for the commitment to work to an undefined time and a flat rate for each additional hour they work after 6pm once that have completed 8 hours work during that day. Staff who are not normally required to work to the rise of House or beyond, but agree to do so, may be eligible for paid overtime payments or time off in lieu (TOIL).</p><p> </p><p>Staff in catering pay bands are required to work until 15 minutes after the rise of the House if they are contracted to work in venues that supply services to Members. Staff who work in these areas or volunteer to work in these areas are paid overtime for any additional hours worked.</p><p> </p><p>Line managers have the discretion to agree flexibility around working hours by compensating individuals for additional hours worked by granting TOIL. Where business needs allow, TOIL can be granted to manage peaks and troughs in workloads. The extent to which TOIL is used varies between areas or roles, but is used frequently in some cases where workloads vary significantly between sitting and non-sitting periods. Work is under way to introduce a Flexible Time Management Policy.</p><p> </p><p>Security staff are employed by the Metropolitan Police Service and are paid in accordance with their terms and conditions of employment.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-14T15:57:56.467Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-14T15:57:56.467Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
previous answer version
20747
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4432
label Biography information for Patrick Grady more like this
418062
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-09more like thismore than 2015-09-09
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Art Works more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how many items in the Parliamentary Art Collection are on loan outside the parliamentary estate. more like this
tabling member constituency Ellesmere Port and Neston more like this
tabling member printed
Justin Madders more like this
uin 9669 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-16more like thismore than 2015-09-16
answer text <p>There are currently four objects from the Parliamentary Art Collection on loan outside the Parliamentary Estate.<br><br>The House of Commons and the House of Lords are actively committed to giving access to the Parliamentary Art Collection to as wide an audience as possible.<br><br>Loan requests are welcomed which will broaden access to the Collection and we are actively developing professional partnerships with other institutions around the UK who are organising exhibitions. In addition to this the Works of Art Committees of both Houses are working hard to raise the profile of the Parliamentary Art Collection and building to increase the number of loans outside the Parliamentary Estate.<br><br>The number of loans out changes from time to time as works are usually loaned for temporary exhibition.<br><br>As the Works of Art Committees have only recently reformed following the election we anticipate that the number of loans out may increase as pending loan requests are considered.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-16T15:07:45.71Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-16T15:07:45.71Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4418
label Biography information for Justin Madders more like this
418060
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-09more like thismore than 2015-09-09
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Art Works more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 30 June 2015 to Question 3834, what disposal strategy there is for the Parliamentary Art Collection. more like this
tabling member constituency Ellesmere Port and Neston more like this
tabling member printed
Justin Madders more like this
uin 9732 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-17more like thismore than 2015-09-17
answer text <p>The disposals policy for the Parliamentary Art Collection was reviewed and agreed in 2013 and is published with my answer.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-17T17:06:45.623Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-17T17:06:45.623Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
attachment
1
file name WoA-Disposal-Policy-2013.pdf more like this
title 4-page document more like this
tabling member
4418
label Biography information for Justin Madders more like this
418061
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-09more like thismore than 2015-09-09
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Art Works more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how many items in the Parliamentary Art Collection are (a) on and (b) not on public display. more like this
tabling member constituency Ellesmere Port and Neston more like this
tabling member printed
Justin Madders more like this
uin 9668 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-09-17more like thismore than 2015-09-17
answer text <p>The total recorded number of works of art in the Parliamentary Art Collection (House of Commons and House of Lords) is 7,900.<br><br>On average, approximately 6,320 works, or 80% of the whole Parliamentary Art Collection is on display around the buildings of the Parliamentary Estate (Commons and Lords) at any one time. Approximately 1,500 of those works are in areas to which the public have access, including committee rooms and banqueting facilities to which guests may be taken.<br><br>The Works of Art Committees take care to ensure that the most important works in the collection are displayed in public areas on the line of route, in committee rooms and in banqueting areas to which the public have access.<br><br>Works from the collection are also drawn from other areas across the Estate for temporary displays such as the current ‘Waterloo, Wellington and Westminster’ exhibition in the Royal Gallery and the Election Artist display in Portcullis House which will accessible during the forthcoming ‘Open House’ weekend.<br><br>The public also have access to the Collection via the Parliamentary Art Collection website <a href="http://www.parliament.uk/art" target="_blank">www.parliament.uk/art</a> which also features online exhibitions, videos and lectures about the collection.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-09-17T17:06:26.93Zmore like thismore than 2015-09-17T17:06:26.93Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4418
label Biography information for Justin Madders more like this
418961
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-15more like thismore than 2015-09-15
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Working Hours more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 14 September 2015 to Question 9407, what estimate the Commission has made of the cost of overtime payments to staff resulting from late sittings of the House in each year since 2010. more like this
tabling member constituency Glasgow North more like this
tabling member printed
Patrick Grady more like this
uin 10253 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-12more like thismore than 2015-10-12
answer text <p>A late sitting can refer to either an occasion when the House sits beyond its likely scheduled rise (i.e. 10.30pm on Monday, 7.30pm on Tuesday and Wednesday, 5.30pm on Thursday); or whenever the House sits beyond 10.00pm.</p><p>Two types of payments are made to staff in order to support evening sittings, including late sittings: the Unsocial Hours Payment (UHP), an annual flat-rate allowance paid across the year to staff required to work to an unspecified time during evening sittings; and the Evening Additional Hours (EAH) payment which reflects the number of additional hours worked after 6pm, paid at a standard rate from 1800 to 2230 and at a higher rate after 2230. Additionally, in certain circumstances overtime may be paid to staff which may or may not be related to the House’s sitting hours. These payments are not reflected in this answer as the records do not indicate in which circumstances they were made to support late sittings. A late night taxi service is provided to staff who are required to work late; this service is only available after 2300.</p><p>Security staff are employed by the Metropolitan Police Service and are paid in accordance with their terms and conditions of employment.</p><p>The costs of UHP, EAH and the late night taxi service in each year since 2010–11 was as follows:</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Unsocial Hours Allowance*</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Evening hours payment*</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Travel Costs</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Total Cost</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010–2011</p></td><td><p>£373,409.48</p></td><td><p>£473,171.13</p></td><td><p>£376,892.69</p></td><td><p>£1,223,473.29</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011–2012</p></td><td><p>£345,556.57</p></td><td><p>£503,810.57</p></td><td><p>£369,859.62</p></td><td><p>£1,219,226.77</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012–2013</p></td><td><p>£334,516.90</p></td><td><p>£433,007.60</p></td><td><p>£264,314.70</p></td><td><p>£1,031,839.20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013–2014</p></td><td><p>£333,091.84</p></td><td><p>£412,079.02</p></td><td><p>£239,546.70</p></td><td><p>£984,717.56</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014–2015</p></td><td><p>£367,756.14</p></td><td><p>£341,638.12</p></td><td><p>£141,814.10</p></td><td><p>£851,208.36</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£1,754,303.93</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£2,163,706.44</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£1,392,427.81</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£5,310,465.18</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>* Inclusive of NI and pension contributions</p><p>It is not possible meaningfully to equate these staffing costs related to evening sittings to an average overall cost per hour of late night sittings for two reasons: firstly, costs for other types of marginal expenditure related to late sittings, such as utilities charges, are not recorded separately; secondly, the staffing costs are paid to facilitate all sittings after 6.00pm, rather than “late” sittings specifically, whether defined as after 10.00pm or beyond the likely scheduled rise.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN 10254 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-12T16:41:55.233Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-12T16:41:55.233Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4432
label Biography information for Patrick Grady more like this
418962
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-15more like thismore than 2015-09-15
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Working Hours more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, pursuant to the Answer of 14 September 2015 to Question 9407, what the average cost per hour is of late sittings of the House. more like this
tabling member constituency Glasgow North more like this
tabling member printed
Patrick Grady more like this
uin 10254 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-12more like thismore than 2015-10-12
answer text <p>A late sitting can refer to either an occasion when the House sits beyond its likely scheduled rise (i.e. 10.30pm on Monday, 7.30pm on Tuesday and Wednesday, 5.30pm on Thursday); or whenever the House sits beyond 10.00pm.</p><p>Two types of payments are made to staff in order to support evening sittings, including late sittings: the Unsocial Hours Payment (UHP), an annual flat-rate allowance paid across the year to staff required to work to an unspecified time during evening sittings; and the Evening Additional Hours (EAH) payment which reflects the number of additional hours worked after 6pm, paid at a standard rate from 1800 to 2230 and at a higher rate after 2230. Additionally, in certain circumstances overtime may be paid to staff which may or may not be related to the House’s sitting hours. These payments are not reflected in this answer as the records do not indicate in which circumstances they were made to support late sittings. A late night taxi service is provided to staff who are required to work late; this service is only available after 2300.</p><p>Security staff are employed by the Metropolitan Police Service and are paid in accordance with their terms and conditions of employment.</p><p>The costs of UHP, EAH and the late night taxi service in each year since 2010–11 was as follows:</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Unsocial Hours Allowance*</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Evening hours payment*</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Travel Costs</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Total Cost</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010–2011</p></td><td><p>£373,409.48</p></td><td><p>£473,171.13</p></td><td><p>£376,892.69</p></td><td><p>£1,223,473.29</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011–2012</p></td><td><p>£345,556.57</p></td><td><p>£503,810.57</p></td><td><p>£369,859.62</p></td><td><p>£1,219,226.77</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012–2013</p></td><td><p>£334,516.90</p></td><td><p>£433,007.60</p></td><td><p>£264,314.70</p></td><td><p>£1,031,839.20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013–2014</p></td><td><p>£333,091.84</p></td><td><p>£412,079.02</p></td><td><p>£239,546.70</p></td><td><p>£984,717.56</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014–2015</p></td><td><p>£367,756.14</p></td><td><p>£341,638.12</p></td><td><p>£141,814.10</p></td><td><p>£851,208.36</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£1,754,303.93</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£2,163,706.44</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£1,392,427.81</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>£5,310,465.18</strong></p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>* Inclusive of NI and pension contributions</p><p>It is not possible meaningfully to equate these staffing costs related to evening sittings to an average overall cost per hour of late night sittings for two reasons: firstly, costs for other types of marginal expenditure related to late sittings, such as utilities charges, are not recorded separately; secondly, the staffing costs are paid to facilitate all sittings after 6.00pm, rather than “late” sittings specifically, whether defined as after 10.00pm or beyond the likely scheduled rise.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN 10253 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-12T16:41:55.33Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-12T16:41:55.33Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4432
label Biography information for Patrick Grady more like this
419569
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-09-17more like thismore than 2015-09-17
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Pay more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how many people employed by the House of Commons (a) directly and (b) indirectly are not receiving a wage of at least £7.85 an hour. more like this
tabling member constituency Paisley and Renfrewshire North more like this
tabling member printed
Gavin Newlands more like this
uin 10568 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-12more like thismore than 2015-10-12
answer text <p>The House of Commons is an accredited London Living Wage Employer. In order to obtain our accreditation, the House has to satisfy the Living Wage Foundation that no directly employed or contracted workers engaged to work on the Parliamentary Estate are paid less than the London Living Wage (LLW), currently £9.15 an hour.</p><p>All contractors and their sub-contractors with staff based in London providing services to the House have agreed to pay at least the London Living Wage to those of their staff working on contracts for the House; or, in the case of staff working for contractors outside London, at least the Living Wage of £7.85 an hour. These contractual requirements are included within our Standard Terms and Conditions of Contract.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-12T09:15:38.883Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-12T09:15:38.883Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4420
label Biography information for Gavin Newlands more like this
420225
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Portcullis House: Fire Alarms more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how many fire alarms in Portcullis House in the last 12 months (a) resulted from fires and (b) were false alarms. more like this
tabling member constituency Birkenhead more like this
tabling member printed
Frank Field more like this
uin 11015 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-19more like thismore than 2015-10-19
answer text <p>Since October 2014 there has been one fire alarm in Portcullis House caused by a fire. There have been six false alarms: two of which were manual call point actuations and four caused by equipment defects or the inadvertent interruption of detector beams.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-19T15:29:15.217Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-19T15:29:15.217Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
478
label Biography information for Frank Field more like this
423393
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-22more like thismore than 2015-10-22
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Palace of Westminster: Repairs and Maintenance more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what progress has been made on confirming the final cost of the Options Appraisal Report into the refurbishment of the Palace of Westminster. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts more like this
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 13110 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-27more like thismore than 2015-10-27
answer text <p>This information was provided in a Written Statement made by my predecessor on 16 December 2014, cols 86–87WS:</p><p><a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmhansrd/cm141216/wmstext/141216m0001.htm#14121636000008" target="_blank">http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201415/cmhansrd/cm141216/wmstext/141216m0001.htm#14121636000008</a></p><p>The final cost of the Independent Options Appraisal was £2.02 million, excluding VAT.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-27T16:51:05Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-27T16:51:05Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
423603
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-23more like thismore than 2015-10-23
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Legal Profession more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, when the Commission plans to publish the list of Roll A Parliamentary Agents for the current Parliament. more like this
tabling member constituency Sheffield, Heeley more like this
tabling member printed
Louise Haigh more like this
uin 13181 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-29more like thismore than 2015-10-29
answer text <p>The current list of Roll A Parliamentary Agents as at May 2015 is available on the Parliamentary Internet at:</p><p><a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/pbagents.htm" target="_blank">http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/pbagents.htm</a></p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-29T17:58:36.067Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-29T17:58:36.067Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4473
label Biography information for Louise Haigh more like this
423604
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-23more like thismore than 2015-10-23
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading City of London Remembrancer more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, if the Commission will review the right of access for the City of London Remembrancer to the Chamber of the House. more like this
tabling member constituency Sheffield, Heeley more like this
tabling member printed
Louise Haigh more like this
uin 13180 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-10-29more like thismore than 2015-10-29
answer text <p>I understand that the Remembrancer is one of some 17 Roll A Parliamentary Agents who work with the promoters of private Bills. Parliamentary Agents are permitted to observe proceedings from the Under Gallery in the Chamber, that is, the visitors’ seats “under the gallery” facing the Speaker, for the purposes of their work. Other visitors may also sometimes sit in the Under Gallery.</p><p>Access to the Chamber and its surroundings is not a matter for the Commission.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-10-29T17:57:23.863Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-29T17:57:23.863Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4473
label Biography information for Louise Haigh more like this
423849
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-26more like thismore than 2015-10-26
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading House of Commons: Credit Unions more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what steps he is taking to promote the use of credit unions in the work of the House of Commons Commission; and if he will make a statement. more like this
tabling member constituency Harrow West more like this
tabling member printed
Gareth Thomas more like this
uin 13516 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-02more like thismore than 2015-11-02
answer text <p>Since March 2013 staff and Members of both Houses have been able to access financial support and advice on managing their personal finances from London Mutual Credit Union (LMCU). In addition they also offer financial products such as savings and loans which can be deducted directly from employees’ salaries via payroll, and for Members via IPSA. In November 2013, the facility with LMCU was formally launched at a reception held by Mr Speaker.</p><p>LMCU is promoted on the Parliamentary intranet, in the House of Commons Staff Handbook and at new staff inductions. LMCU also have a presence at the annual Wellbeing Day.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-02T17:31:00.597Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-02T17:31:00.597Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
177
label Biography information for Gareth Thomas more like this
425142
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-30more like thismore than 2015-10-30
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Internet more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, if he will take steps to ensure that the parliament.uk website states the country in which hon. Members' constituencies are located. more like this
tabling member constituency Aberdeen North more like this
tabling member printed
Kirsty Blackman more like this
uin 14160 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-05more like thismore than 2015-11-05
answer text <p>The way that Members’ biographical information is displayed on Parliament’s website is not a matter for the Commission. I have, however, drawn the Administration Committee’s attention to the hon. Member’s request, and would advise her to approach the Chair of that Committee directly to discuss her proposal. The Administration Committee can then decide whether to offer advice on this matter to the authorities of the House.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-05T11:26:43.79Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-05T11:26:43.79Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
previous answer version
27856
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4357
label Biography information for Kirsty Blackman more like this
424629
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission consulted (a) users and (b) makers of vellum on ending the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13882 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.217Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.217Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424630
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what alternative media for printing Acts of Parliament the Commission has considered. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13883 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.327Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.327Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424631
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate the Commission has made of the potential savings from ending the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament; and on what basis that estimate was made. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13884 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.437Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.437Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424632
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how much the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament cost in each year since 1999. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13885 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.547Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.547Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424633
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what discussions the Commission has had with archival experts (a) within and (b) outside Parliament on ending the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13880 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:58.883Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:58.883Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424634
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what advice the Commission has received on the comparative longevity of archival paper and vellum. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13881 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.117Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.117Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424635
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate the Commission has made of the average cost of the reproduction of an Act of Parliament on archival paper once it has deteriorated. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13957 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.74Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.74Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424636
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate the Commission has made of the annual cost of the (a) storage, (b) continued care and maintenance and (c) re-printing of archival paper. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 13958 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
14164 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.833Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.833Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
425143
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-10-30more like thismore than 2015-10-30
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate the Commission has made of the savings from ending the printing of Acts of Parliament on vellum; and what proportion of those savings arises from (a) William Cowley and (b) other costs from the use of vellum. more like this
tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
uin 14164 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.957Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.957Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
1521
label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
427243
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Palace of Westminster: Repairs and Maintenance more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, if he will take steps to ensure the inclusion in budgetary provisions for a programme to restore and renew the Palace of Westminster proposals for commemorating Augustus Pugin at St Augustine's Church, Ramsgate. more like this
tabling member constituency South Thanet more like this
tabling member printed
Craig Mackinlay more like this
uin 15347 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-17more like thismore than 2015-11-17
answer text <p>It would go beyond the statutory remit of the House of Commons Commission to make budgetary provision for the project in Ramsgate. However, the Commission is well aware of the contribution that Augustus Welby Pugin made to the design of the Palace of Westminster and is delighted that it was possible last year to donate some original encaustic tiles from the Palace for public display in St. Augustine’s Church.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-17T11:37:09.543Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-17T11:37:09.543Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4529
label Biography information for Craig Mackinlay more like this
427782
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-11-10more like thismore than 2015-11-10
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Palace of Westminster: Fire Prevention more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, for what reasons a fire safety contract with Norland Managed Services, London has been awarded outwith the Restoration and Renewal project for the Palace of Westminster. more like this
tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts more like this
tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
uin 15695 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-19more like thismore than 2015-11-19
answer text <p>This contract is one element of a wider programme to achieve compliance with the Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order 2005 by the end of 2018, in accordance with a commitment the House made in 2011 to the Crown Premises Inspection Group.</p><p>Achieving compliance will reduce the risk of fire causing loss of life or injury to individuals, destroying or damaging the building, or disrupting the work of Parliament.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-19T12:11:31.597Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-19T12:11:31.597Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4365
label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
428826
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-11-17more like thismore than 2015-11-17
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: ICT more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how many incidents of (a) hacking, (b) viruses and (c) data breaches were reported to the Parliamentary Digital Service in the last 12 months. more like this
tabling member constituency Newcastle upon Tyne Central more like this
tabling member printed
Chi Onwurah more like this
uin 16688 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-20more like thismore than 2015-11-20
answer text <p>We do not comment on matters of digital or physical security. I understand the Director of the Digital Service has discussed the matter with the hon. Member.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-20T12:39:33.933Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-20T12:39:33.933Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4124
label Biography information for Chi Onwurah more like this
428827
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-11-17more like thismore than 2015-11-17
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Members' Constituency Work: Data Protection more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what steps the Parliamentary Digital Service is taking to protect constituency casework data. more like this
tabling member constituency Newcastle upon Tyne Central more like this
tabling member printed
Chi Onwurah more like this
uin 16678 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-20more like thismore than 2015-11-20
answer text <p>We do not comment on matters of digital or physical security. I understand the Director of the Digital Service has discussed the matter with the hon. Member.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-20T14:51:01.6Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-20T14:51:01.6Z
answering member
151
label Biography information for Tom Brake more like this
tabling member
4124
label Biography information for Chi Onwurah more like this
428828
registered interest false more like this
date less than 2015-11-17more like thismore than 2015-11-17
answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept id 18 more like this
answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
hansard heading Parliament: Security more like this
house id 1 more like this
legislature
25259
pref label House of Commons more like this
question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, if he will provide an update on whether there are plans for a review of security protocols for the Parliamentary Estate and what communication the Serjeant at Arms office has had with relevant government departments on increasing the security of the House and the safety of staff. more like this
tabling member constituency Dumfries and Galloway more like this
tabling member printed
Richard Arkless more like this
uin 16656 more like this
answer
answer
is ministerial correction false more like this
date of answer less than 2015-11-20more like thismore than 2015-11-20
answer text <p>It is a long-standing practice that we do not comment in public on the security of Parliament. However, I can assure the hon. Member that arrangements are kept under continual review and those working on the Estate are advised of any changes. If he has particular concerns the Parliamentary Security Director and the Serjeant at Arms would be happy to meet with him.</p> more like this
answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington remove filter
answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
question first answered
less than 2015-11-20T10:37:47.1Zmore like this