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223189
unstar this property hansard heading Technology and Innovation Centres more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department for Business, Innovation and Skills has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.</p> more like this
42732
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>These figures are not collected centrally. Schools make their own decisions on what training their staffs need to support their pupils based on the individual circumstances of the school.</p><p>The Department for Education funds the Autism Education Trust (AET) to provide tiered training on autism: basic awareness training for teaching and non-teaching staff at level 1; practical knowledge and hands-on tools and techniques for all staff working directly with children and young people with autistic spectrum disorders at level 2; and level 3 training for those seeking more advanced knowledge and those pursuing a training role, such as lead practitioners in autism and Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators. Between 2011 and 2013 the AET received grant funding to provide training to schools and from 2013 to 2015 is receiving funding under contract to provide training to early years providers, schools and further education colleges.</p><p> </p> more like this
42735
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>These figures are not collected centrally. The Department for Education does not collect information on the number of places available to provide specialist support in schools for children and young people on the autism spectrum. Local authorities are expected to keep their arrangements for providing special educational needs under review.</p><p>We do collect the numbers of pupils in special schools in England with a primary need of ‘Autistic Spectrum Disorder' are given in the table below.</p><p>Pupils with special educational needs with a primary need of ‘Autistic Spectrum Disorder' in special schools in England, January 2013</p><table><tbody><tr><td> </td><td><p>Number</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>England</p></td><td><p>20,735</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>London</p></td><td><p>3,640</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Lambeth</p></td><td><p>150</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Source: School Census</p><p>Figures are rounded to the nearest 5.</p><p>Information on special educational needs is published annually in the publication Special Educational Needs in England', available at:</p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2013" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/special-educational-needs-in-england-january-2013</a></p>
43701
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department for Education recognises that provision for all children and young people with special educational needs (SEN) across England, including those on the autism spectrum, needs to be improved and that is why we are taking forward the reforms in the Children and Families Act, which recently received Royal Assent. Part 3 of the Act will bring about significant reforms to the SEN system from which children and young people with autism will benefit along with their peers, in particular from earlier, and more comprehensive, assessment and intervention and stronger arrangements for the transition from children's to adult services, which many on the spectrum can find extremely difficult. </p><p>In 2008 the Autism Education Trust published a report ‘Educational provision for children and young people living in England'. That report found that “practice in many mainstream and special schools had improved tremendously over recent years” but that there was still much to be done “in reaching staff in schools who are not yet familiar with the particular needs of pupils on the autism spectrum and who struggle to teach them effectively.”</p><p>The Government has continued to fund the Trust, putting the emphasis on improving awareness and skills amongst early years, schools and further education staff. From January 2012 to February 2014, 22,451 staff have received level 1 basic awareness training, 3,214 have received level 2 hands-on tools and techniques training and 775 have received level 3 training for those who want to develop their knowledge of autism further and those who will themselves take on a training role, such as school Special Educational Needs Co-ordinators. </p><p>Education, including SEN, is a devolved matter and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland have responsibility for autism educational provision in their administrations.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p>
43965
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government's aim is to ensure that in every local area, young people aged 16 have access to an online portal that gives them access to a range of education and training opportunities.</p><p>Over the coming weeks, we will be discussing with local authorities and others interested in this area how this portal can most effectively be delivered and will make further announcements in due course.</p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
45709
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p /> <p /> <p>This data is not available.</p> more like this
45710
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p /> <p /> <p>Jobcentre Plus guidance stipulates that claimants should not be mandated to apply for a job offering a zero hours contract. It also states that no sanction action will be taken if claimants refuse or fail to apply. A person leaving a zero hours contract job will not be sanctioned if they leave that job voluntarily or lose it through their misconduct.</p> more like this
45713
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p /> <p /> <p>The information requested is not held by the Department.</p> more like this
45714
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p /> <p /> <p>We do not advertise in jobcentres, all vacancies are now advertised on Universal Jobmatch. JSA claimants are not required to apply for zero-hour contract jobs and are not penalised if they leave such a job</p><p><strong> </strong></p> more like this
45718
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p /> <p /> <p>Jobseekers are not required to apply for zero-hours contract vacancies, they will not be sanctioned as a result of not applying.</p> more like this