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1083407
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The government already provides funding via the Office for Students to support subjects where the costs of teaching exceed the income that providers receive through tuition fees. This includes agricultural courses with elements of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Current rates of high-cost funding are included in the ‘Office for Students: Guide to funding 2018-19’, attached.</p><p>Future funding for higher education will be announced in the forthcoming Spending Review following the Review of Post-18 Education and Funding, which is currently underway.</p><p> </p> more like this
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3343
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Byford more like this
1083408
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Distance learning offers excellent possibilities to open up choice and opportunity to people from a diverse range of backgrounds, including those from rural areas, and the government believes it should be widely available at a range of educational levels. Student support for tuition at higher education (HE) level is available for students who want to study on a part-time basis or by distance learning.</p><p> </p><p>The National Retraining Scheme (NRS) is an ambitious, far-reaching programme to drive adult retraining. It will help individuals to respond to the changing labour market, redirect their careers and secure better, more secure jobs of the future.</p><p> </p><p>To inform the design of the scheme, the Flexible Learning Fund is supporting 31 pilot projects across England with a total value of £11.4 million. The projects are designing and testing innovative, flexible learning that is easy to access. The pilots are aimed at adults who are working, or who are returning to work, with either low or intermediate skills. A range of delivery methods are being tested; most of the projects will make use of on-line technologies to a degree, as well as ‘blended learning’ that combines online and face-to-face learning.</p><p>My right hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has previously announced that Educational Technology (Edtech) and Artificial Intelligence (AI) would be a key feature of the NRS. Technological innovation and development, including in AI, will play an important part in improving the learning experience, design and effectiveness of online training.</p><p> </p><p>The government has committed up to £30 million of funding. Working closely with the technology industry we will look to innovate, test and develop ways in which technological solutions can directly answer the specific needs of NRS users alongside all learners. Details of the funding will be announced in spring 2019.</p><p> </p><p>It is only right that HE providers offer a range of options which suit all students, and that students have a real choice about where and how to study. The Review of Post-18 Education and Funding will consider how we can encourage and support more learning that is flexible, like part-time and distance learning, and enable more people to study close to where they live. The review will report later this year.</p><p> </p><p>The regulatory system is also a means of opening up HE to a more diverse range of provision and therefore to a wider range of students. The Higher Education and Research Act, which came into law in 2017, placed a duty on the Office for Students to consider other modes of study when promoting choice and opportunity in the provision of HE.</p><p> </p><p>Through recent HE reforms, we are working to support and encourage high quality new and innovative provision that has a strong offer for students, helping providers to navigate the regulatory system and we will continue to work with new providers to tackle any barriers that might arise.</p>
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3343
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Byford more like this
1024226
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>​​Both the Department for Education (DfE) and Office for Students (OfS) were made aware of the decision to defer the planned speech by the Israeli Ambassador. The DfE’s Further Education/Higher Education coordinator has been in contact with the institution.</p><p>​Freedom of speech is a crucial element of higher education and government and OfS are committed to championing it and to promoting open debate and challenge. Universities are autonomous bodies and are responsible for taking their own decisions around how to manage events and mitigate risks; handling of individual cases is not dictated by government or by the OfS. The OfS has powers to intervene if providers are not following their own free speech codes of practice</p> more like this
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3756
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Deech more like this
1024227
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The previous Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation held a free speech summit in May, where sector leaders agreed to collectively develop a single piece of guidance. The government has worked alongside sector leaders to set out key principles for universities and student unions managing free speech. The Equalities and Human Rights Commission will be publishing guidance in 2019 on how to ensure that freedom of speech within the law is upheld effectively in higher education institutions, whilst acknowledging their other legal duties.</p><p> </p> more like this
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3756
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Deech more like this
1024228
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The government is deeply committed to protecting freedom of speech within the law. The freedom to express views openly, challenge ideas and engage in robust debate is crucial to the student experience and to democracy. Individuals should never be in a position where they can be stopped from expressing an opinion perfectly lawfully. Institutions are required to balance risks and legal obligations with a view to ensuring freedom of speech wherever reasonably practicable.</p><p>The Joint Committee on Human Rights held an inquiry into freedom of speech in universities earlier this year, which looked in detail and collected evidence in relation to upholding freedom of speech in universities. Drawing on information from the inquiry, which found the current regulatory landscape protecting freedom of speech to be extremely complex, the Equality and Human Rights Commission and key partners in the higher education sector have worked with the Department of Education to develop a single piece of guidance, which will set out key principles. This guidance will enable universities and student unions to understand their obligations for protecting and supporting free speech.</p>
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3756
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Deech more like this
1105689
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes data on UK higher education (HE).</p><p>Analysis of HESA’s ‘Student Record 2017/18’ shows that there were 2 HE institutions in England with one or more participants in agroecology[1] modules in the academic year 2017/18. These agroecology modules were all at postgraduate level at either Harper Adams University or Coventry University.</p><p>Module data for HE provided by further education colleges and alternative providers is not held centrally.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>[1] Relevant module titles identified in the HESA Student Record were ‘Fundamentals of Agroecology’, ‘Agroecological Techniques and Practices’ and ‘Agroecological Production Systems’.</p> more like this
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1934
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer more like this
1105691
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) collects and publishes statistics on staff at UK Higher Education Institutions (HEIs). Latest statistics refer to the academic year 2017/18.</p><p> </p><p>Each staff member can be recorded as teaching and/or researching up to 3 academic disciplines[1]. Counts of the number of academic staff and professors involved in the most closely related academic disciplines to those requested have been provided in the table:</p><p> </p><p><strong>Full-person-equivalent<strong>[2]</strong> academic staff by current academic discipline at English HEIs for </strong></p><p><strong>Academic Year 2017/18</strong></p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Academic discipline</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Professors</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>All academic staff</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>C340 Entomology</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>65</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>F770 Soil Science</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>25</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>C500 Microbiology</p></td><td><p>55</p></td><td><p>445</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>C510 Applied Microbiology</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p>55</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>Source: Department for Education analysis of the HESA Staff Record</p><p> </p><p>Notes:</p><p>Figures are rounded to the nearest 5 in line with HESA’s rounding strategy.</p><p> </p><p>Staff can be recorded across more than one academic discipline, so rows in the table ought not to be summed together.</p><p> </p><p>‘Professor’ indicates a member of staff holding a contract which aligns with the Universities and Colleges Employers Association contract level 5A 'Professor'. This may undercount professors because many will fall into more senior levels, e.g. Heads of department.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>[1] Academic disciplines are categorised using the Joint Academic Coding System: <a href="https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c17025/a/curaccdis" target="_blank">https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c17025/a/curaccdis</a>.</p><p> </p><p>[2] The definition for full-person-equivalent is available from the HESA website:</p><p><a href="https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c17025/fte_vs_fpe" target="_blank">https://www.hesa.ac.uk/collection/c17025/fte_vs_fpe</a>.</p>
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1934
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer more like this
1087587
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The government values international exchange and collaboration in education and training as part of its vision for a global Britain. We are open to participation in the successor Erasmus+ scheme (2021/27) though this will ultimately be subject to wider UK-EU negotiations on the future partnership. We are considering a wide range of options with regards to the future of international exchange and collaboration in education and training, including potential domestic alternatives. As part of this process, the Department for Education (DfE) is listening to stakeholder views. We have also noted and are considering the recommendations from the recent House of Lords EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee on the future of Erasmus+.</p><p>Further to this, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and my hon. Friend, the Minister of State for Universities, Science and Innovation meet with representatives of universities regularly to discuss the DfE agenda, and that has included the question of international exchanges following the UK’s exit from the EU.</p><p>As we progress our thinking and work on our plans for the possibility of participation in the successor Erasmus+ programme or a domestic alternative, we will continue to engage with and seek the views of sector stakeholders, among others.</p><p> </p>
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2471
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Warwick of Undercliffe more like this
1061390
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Widening access and participation in higher and further education is a priority for this government. Everyone with the capability to succeed should have  the opportunity to benefit from a university education, regardless of their background or where they grew up. On 1 February 2019, we announced measures to tackle ethnic disparities in higher education. The announcement is attached and can also be found at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/news/universities-must-do-more-to-tackle-ethnic-disparity" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/news/universities-must-do-more-to-tackle-ethnic-disparity</a>.</p><p> </p><p>The new regulator for higher education, the Office for Students (OfS) has a statutory duty in regards to students who share particular characteristics, (protected under the Equality Act 2010), and where there is specific evidence that barriers exist that may prevent equality of opportunity, including those from the Gypsy, Roma and Traveller communities.</p><p> </p><p>Through Access and Participation Plans agreed with the OfS, higher education providers are expected to reduce the gaps in access, success and progression for under-represented groups amongst their students.</p><p> </p><p>Eligible 16 to 19 year olds do not pay tuition fees for post-16 further education (e.g. A Levels and approved technical qualifications). This enables young people to meet the requirement of continuing to participate in education or training beyond the age of 16.</p><p> </p><p>Eligibility to receive public funding for further education for adults (those aged 19 and above), is based on age, prior attainment and a learner’s circumstances. Skills provision is prioritised and focussed towards young adults, those with low skills and unemployed people who are actively seeking work.</p><p> </p><p>In addition, the government also provides financial support to enable learners to participate in post-16 further education, whatever their financial situation. This includes contributions to costs such as transport, childcare, essential books, equipment and accommodation.</p>
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2510
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Whitaker more like this
1042971
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Study needs assessors of Disabled Students’ Allowance (DSA) determine the specific support a student requires. They are currently not required to hold an Assessment Practising Certificate.</p><p> </p><p>We recently announced the decision to allow students with Specific Learning Difficulties, such as dyslexia, who are applying for DSA to use evidence of their diagnosis from before 16 years of age. Currently, for the purposes of DSA, the person carrying out this diagnostic assessment must hold an Assessment Practising Certificate, but we are considering whether to allow alternative accreditation routes.</p><p> </p> more like this
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3453
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Addington more like this
1056429
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>It is the department, not the SpLD Assessment Standards Committee, that decides which diagnostic assessments should be recognised as suitable evidence to determine eligibility for Disabled Students’ Allowances. The department is currently considering which accreditation requirements should be met for diagnostic assessments carried out on young people below the age of 16.</p><p>Information regarding the qualifications or professional memberships of those undertaking dyslexia assessments for young people below the age of 16 is not held centrally, nor is it held by the Student Loans Company.</p> more like this
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3453
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Addington more like this
1056430
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>It is the department, not the SpLD Assessment Standards Committee, that decides which diagnostic assessments should be recognised as suitable evidence to determine eligibility for Disabled Students’ Allowances. The department is currently considering which accreditation requirements should be met for diagnostic assessments carried out on young people below the age of 16.</p><p>Information regarding the qualifications or professional memberships of those undertaking dyslexia assessments for young people below the age of 16 is not held centrally, nor is it held by the Student Loans Company.</p> more like this
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3453
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Addington more like this
1064572
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The department is yet to conclude discussions currently being held with relevant experts, including the British Dyslexia Association, about the qualifications that should be held by those undertaking specific learning difficulty diagnostic assessments that can be used to determine eligibility for Disabled Students’ Allowances. The experts with whom the department is discussing this issue have knowledge and understanding of diagnostic assessment undertaken for school pupils. The department expects to conclude these discussions by the middle of March 2019.</p> more like this
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3453
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Addington more like this
1064573
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The department is yet to conclude discussions currently being held with relevant experts, including the British Dyslexia Association, about the qualifications that should be held by those undertaking specific learning difficulty diagnostic assessments that can be used to determine eligibility for Disabled Students’ Allowances. The experts with whom the department is discussing this issue have knowledge and understanding of diagnostic assessment undertaken for school pupils. The department expects to conclude these discussions by the middle of March 2019.</p> more like this
star this property tabling member
3453
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Addington more like this
1064574
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The department is yet to conclude discussions currently being held with relevant experts, including the British Dyslexia Association, about the qualifications that should be held by those undertaking specific learning difficulty diagnostic assessments that can be used to determine eligibility for Disabled Students’ Allowances. The experts with whom the department is discussing this issue have knowledge and understanding of diagnostic assessment undertaken for school pupils. The department expects to conclude these discussions by the middle of March 2019.</p> more like this
star this property tabling member
3453
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Addington more like this
1046297
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>​There is no place for extremism in our society and extremist views should be exposed and challenged.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Education has not engaged with any institutions, including SOAS University of London, in relation to the Henry Jackson Society report.</p><p> </p><p>The government believes that free speech should been encouraged, provided that it is within the law as it encourages debate and understanding. Challenging extremist speakers and events is an important part of tackling extremist narratives. However, this does not mean closing down lawful speech, but rather ensuring the right steps are taken to counter extremist narratives and make sure that those who wish to spread hatred do not go unchallenged.</p><p> </p><p>The Prevent duty requires higher education institutions to ensure they have mitigated the risk of extremist speakers spreading harmful narratives before an event can go ahead.</p><p> </p><p>​The Equality and Human Rights Commission is developing new guidance on freedom of speech in higher education, which will be published shortly.</p>
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738
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
1059175
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Higher Education institutions are independent, autonomous bodies. As such, they are responsible for their own admissions decisions.</p><p> </p><p>Data on the number of applicants with offers for deferred entry who were no longer offered their intended course is not held centrally. Consequently, no assessment has been made of the cost implications to prospective students in this scenario.</p><p> </p><p>We are concerned by the steep rise in the number of unconditional offers being made to students. Where institutions cannot justify the rising numbers being offered we have made clear to the Office for Students that they should use the full range of powers at their disposal to take action. We expect universities to act responsibly when setting admissions criteria and expect admissions to be fair, accessible and transparent.</p> more like this
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738
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
1064782
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Department for Education has not made any recommendations to the Office for Students (OfS) to reverse prior offers of places to students who already satisfied previously advertised admissions criteria.</p><p>We have made clear to the OfS that they should use the full range of powers at their disposal to take action where an institution cannot justify their rising numbers of unconditional offers. However, we recognise that where a student already has relevant entry level qualifications, and for some creative arts subjects, unconditional offers may be justified. Admissions are a matter of institutional autonomy but we expect universities to make their admissions criteria fair, accessible and transparent.</p><p> </p> more like this
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738
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
1077036
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>While higher education institutions have autonomy over admissions, the vast majority of undergraduate applications in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are handled by the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) on behalf of those institutions. As the shared admissions service, UCAS offers support to universities and colleges in this area through their services. It is also in institutions’ interests to keep accurate and transparent records of applications and admission. The Office for Students, as the independent regulator of higher education, also has a legal responsibility to ensure that registered institutions are acting in the best interests of students, including support in access to higher education.</p> more like this
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738
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
1081642
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>There are no such regulations, and no recommendations have been made to the Office for Students (OfS) to that effect.</p><p>In relation to undergraduate admissions, once an offer has been made and accepted by a prospective student, a contract is formed between the higher education provider and the student. This is certainly the view of the Competition and Markets Authority, as set out on page 31 of its guidance to higher education providers on consumer law dated 12 March 2015, and it is already a condition of registration imposed by the OfS that registered providers must give due regard to relevant guidance on how to comply with consumer law. Given this, we do not see the need for any additional regulation to protect students against the potential withdrawal of an offer they have already accepted.</p> more like this
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738
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
1049558
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Applicants to full-time undergraduate degrees apply through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). UCAS have published data on the number of unconditional offers and the proportion of offers made that were unconditional since 2010. The data covers offers made to 18 year olds from England, Northern Ireland and Wales.</p><p>The table shows the number of unconditional offers made and the proportion of offers made that were unconditional to 18 year old applicants from England, Northern Ireland, and Wales.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number of unconditional offers</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Proportion of offers made that were unconditional</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>5,105</p></td><td><p>0.6%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>3,355</p></td><td><p>0.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,605</p></td><td><p>0.3%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>2,985</p></td><td><p>0.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>12,115</p></td><td><p>1.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>23,410</p></td><td><p>2.5%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016</p></td><td><p>36,825</p></td><td><p>3.9%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017</p></td><td><p>51,615</p></td><td><p>5.3%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018</p></td><td><p>67,915</p></td><td><p>7.1%</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>Source: UCAS End of Cycle reports 2017 and 2018:</p><p><a href="https://www.ucas.com/file/196151/download?token=jzRAy4kS" target="_blank">https://www.ucas.com/file/196151/download?token=jzRAy4kS</a>.</p><p><a href="https://www.ucas.com/file/140406/download?token=pfzLAKRe" target="_blank">https://www.ucas.com/file/140406/download?token=pfzLAKRe</a>.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Notes</p><ol><li>UCAS defines an unconditional offer as a provider decision to grant a place to an applicant that is not subject to the applicant satisfying academic and/or other criteria.A conditional unconditional offer is an offer made by a provider which was originally conditional, but becomes unconditional if the applicant selects that offer as their firm (first) choice. By definition, conditional unconditional offers that are selected as a firm choice by the applicant become unconditional and are also included in the unconditional offers group.Offer with an unconditional component are defined as an offers showing as having an element of unconditional offer-making, that is, unconditional offers plus conditional unconditional offers that have not been selected as firm (and hence remain conditional unconditional).</li><li>Figures provided in the table are based on the offer status at the 30 June application deadline.</li><li>Data on conditional unconditional offers, and offers that had an unconditional component have not been included in the table due to data not being published prior to 2013.</li></ol><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information regarding which universities allocated places to applicants on an unconditional basis and for each of those universities, what percentage of total offers were unconditional in each of those years is not held centrally.</p><p>However, on 31 January UCAS published data on unconditional offers by each provider for the first time as part of their 2018 End of Cycle data releases. For each provider, UCAS have published data on the number and proportion of offers that were unconditional, conditional unconditional, and offers that had an unconditional component since 2013. Further information can be found at: <a href="https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/undergraduate-statistics-and-reports/ucas-undergraduate-end-cycle-reports/2018-ucas-undergraduate-unconditional-offer-making-provider-reports" target="_blank">https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/undergraduate-statistics-and-reports/ucas-undergraduate-end-cycle-reports/2018-ucas-undergraduate-unconditional-offer-making-provider-reports</a> – then select ‘Individual 2018 provider level unconditional offer-making CSVs’.</p><p> </p><p>The government are concerned by the increase in unconditional offers, and have asked the higher education (HE) regulator, the Office for Students (OfS), to monitor and review how they are being used by HE providers. Where institutions cannot justify the rising numbers being offered we have made clear to the OfS that they should use the full range of powers at their disposal to take action.</p>
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3504
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Bassam of Brighton more like this
1049559
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Applicants to full-time undergraduate degrees apply through the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS). UCAS have published data on the number of unconditional offers and the proportion of offers made that were unconditional since 2010. The data covers offers made to 18 year olds from England, Northern Ireland and Wales.</p><p>The table shows the number of unconditional offers made and the proportion of offers made that were unconditional to 18 year old applicants from England, Northern Ireland, and Wales.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Number of unconditional offers</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Proportion of offers made that were unconditional</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>5,105</p></td><td><p>0.6%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>3,355</p></td><td><p>0.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,605</p></td><td><p>0.3%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>2,985</p></td><td><p>0.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>12,115</p></td><td><p>1.4%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>23,410</p></td><td><p>2.5%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016</p></td><td><p>36,825</p></td><td><p>3.9%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017</p></td><td><p>51,615</p></td><td><p>5.3%</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018</p></td><td><p>67,915</p></td><td><p>7.1%</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>Source: UCAS End of Cycle reports 2017 and 2018:</p><p><a href="https://www.ucas.com/file/196151/download?token=jzRAy4kS" target="_blank">https://www.ucas.com/file/196151/download?token=jzRAy4kS</a>.</p><p><a href="https://www.ucas.com/file/140406/download?token=pfzLAKRe" target="_blank">https://www.ucas.com/file/140406/download?token=pfzLAKRe</a>.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Notes</p><ol><li>UCAS defines an unconditional offer as a provider decision to grant a place to an applicant that is not subject to the applicant satisfying academic and/or other criteria.A conditional unconditional offer is an offer made by a provider which was originally conditional, but becomes unconditional if the applicant selects that offer as their firm (first) choice. By definition, conditional unconditional offers that are selected as a firm choice by the applicant become unconditional and are also included in the unconditional offers group.Offer with an unconditional component are defined as an offers showing as having an element of unconditional offer-making, that is, unconditional offers plus conditional unconditional offers that have not been selected as firm (and hence remain conditional unconditional).</li><li>Figures provided in the table are based on the offer status at the 30 June application deadline.</li><li>Data on conditional unconditional offers, and offers that had an unconditional component have not been included in the table due to data not being published prior to 2013.</li></ol><p> </p><p> </p><p>Information regarding which universities allocated places to applicants on an unconditional basis and for each of those universities, what percentage of total offers were unconditional in each of those years is not held centrally.</p><p>However, on 31 January UCAS published data on unconditional offers by each provider for the first time as part of their 2018 End of Cycle data releases. For each provider, UCAS have published data on the number and proportion of offers that were unconditional, conditional unconditional, and offers that had an unconditional component since 2013. Further information can be found at: <a href="https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/undergraduate-statistics-and-reports/ucas-undergraduate-end-cycle-reports/2018-ucas-undergraduate-unconditional-offer-making-provider-reports" target="_blank">https://www.ucas.com/data-and-analysis/undergraduate-statistics-and-reports/ucas-undergraduate-end-cycle-reports/2018-ucas-undergraduate-unconditional-offer-making-provider-reports</a> – then select ‘Individual 2018 provider level unconditional offer-making CSVs’.</p><p> </p><p>The government are concerned by the increase in unconditional offers, and have asked the higher education (HE) regulator, the Office for Students (OfS), to monitor and review how they are being used by HE providers. Where institutions cannot justify the rising numbers being offered we have made clear to the OfS that they should use the full range of powers at their disposal to take action.</p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Bassam of Brighton more like this
1037590
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Universities are autonomous from government, and consequently control the criteria used to determine admissions. We are aware that some universities, notably those that comprise the Russell Group, identify the A level subjects most likely to facilitate entry to university. However, many other higher education institutions are guided simply by UCAS calculations of tariff points, which give equal weighting to A levels, regardless of subject. The government recognises the importance of arts subjects, including music. Students’ ability to make informed choices is at the heart of our recent reforms to higher education. The department is increasing the information available to students to ensure they can make informed choices about what and where to study.</p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Black of Brentwood more like this
1078958
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>This government recognises the importance of arts subjects, including music. Universities are autonomous from government and consequently control the criteria used to determine admissions. We are aware that the Russell Group, which comprises 24 of the UK’s leading universities, publish guidance designed to assist applicants in identifying the A level subjects most likely to facilitate entry to one of their member universities. From engagement with the Russell Group, we understand they are currently reviewing their guidance.</p><p>The ability for students to make informed choices is at the heart of our recent reforms to higher education. We are increasing the information available to students to ensure they can make informed choices about what and where to study.</p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Black of Brentwood more like this
1052513
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The government and the Office for Students (OfS) are focused on addressing inequalities in higher education. Government consulted on the publication of data on senior staff remuneration, including in relation to gender and ethnicity. The OfS retains the power to require the disclosure of such information through its accounts direction.</p><p>Higher education institutions are independent and responsible for decisions about who they employ. Universities, like every employer, must ensure they meet their obligations under the Equality Act 2010. On February 1, the government announced measures to tackle ethnic disparities in higher education including encouraging higher education providers to make use of tools such as the Race at Work Charter and the Race Equality Charter to drive forward a step-change in the recruitment and progression of ethnic minority employees.</p><p>The government has also consulted on ethnicity pay reporting in order to inform future government policy.</p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Boateng more like this
1052514
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Higher education institutions are independent and responsible for decisions about who they employ. Universities, like every employer, must ensure they meet their obligations under the Equality Act 2010. Through the Race Disparity Audit, my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister set out her expectation that more must be done to create a workforce that is representative of British society today. On 1 February, the government launched measures to drive change in tackling inequalities between ethnic groups in higher education.</p><p>Equality and Diversity in higher education is a priority for government and the Office for Students (OfS). The OfS will use Access and Participation Plans to hold higher education providers to account for disparities in access and attainment of black and ethnic minority students.</p><p>This year, for the first time, registered higher education providers will be required to publish data on measures including attainment broken down by ethnicity, gender and socio-economic groups. This will increase transparency on attainment gaps for ethnic minority students, shining a light on those providers that are not performing well.</p><p> </p>
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147
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Boateng more like this
1050775
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​The terms and conditions of repayment of student loans are set out by the Education (Student Loans) (Repayment) Regulations 2009 (as amended). These regulations make provision for repayment for borrowers resident both in the UK and overseas, including the EU.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Education continues to work closely with the Student Loans Company (SLC) to ensure a robust overseas repayment strategy. The SLC has arrangements in place to collect repayments from borrowers who move away from the UK and establishes a repayment schedule based on the borrower’s income and provides information on the methods of repayment available.</p><p> </p><p>If borrowers based overseas fail to remain in contact with the SLC, the SLC will set up a fixed repayment schedule and place those borrowers in arrears. Borrowers with post-2012 loans who have not remained in contact with the SLC are charged the maximum interest rate of RPI+3% until they get back in touch. Further action, including legal action, can then be taken to secure recovery.</p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Browne of Belmont more like this
1050776
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The Student Loans Company (SLC) administers student loans for each of the UK government administrations. The information is not held in the requested format, however the SLC publishes data on the number of EU nationals who have been placed in arrears, as they have not provided details of their income. Around 9,600 EU borrowers had not provided details of their income and had been placed in arrears as at 31 April 2018.</p><p> </p><p>Statistics covering loan repayments are published annually by the SLC for each UK government administration as part of the ‘Debt and repayment statistics for England 2017-18’. More detailed information on the repayment statuses of home and EU domiciled borrowers, who are liable for repayment, can be found in tables 3A and 3B of the statistics publication (attached).</p><p> </p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Browne of Belmont more like this
1020045
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Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is making important progress in tackling online safety issues through the Digital Charter, which is guided by a number of principles and whose core purpose is to make the Internet work for everyone – for citizens, businesses and society as a whole.</p><p> </p><p>Online anonymity is an important part of a free and open internet, providing essential protection for those who need it and allowing for many kinds of self expression and communication that would not otherwise be possible. But being anonymous online does not give anyone the right to abuse others or break the law.</p><p> </p><p>In the Winter, the Government will publish an Online Harms White Paper setting out a range of legislative and non-legislative measures to ensure tech companies take more responsibility for the safety of their users.</p> more like this
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499
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Campbell-Savours more like this
1028321
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Music qualifications are not included in the EU Mutual Recognition of Professional Qualifications Directive. The EU only has supporting competence in education and there is no EU law on the recognition of academic qualifications.</p><p> </p> more like this
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3396
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Clement-Jones more like this
1037605
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The Review of Post-18 Education and Funding is being informed by independent advice from an expert panel, chaired by Philip Augar.</p><p> </p><p>The panel have undertaken an extensive programme of stakeholder engagement and evidence gathering. They will report in 2019 before government concludes the overall review.</p><p>The government will want to move swiftly to improve the post-18 system once the review has concluded. Implementation timetables will depend on the review’s findings and recommendations and the legislative and operational requirements.</p><p> </p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Goodlad more like this
1104650
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The government values international exchange and collaboration in education and training as part of its vision for a global Britain. Irrespective of the outcome of Article 50 negotiations with the EU, the government wants UK and European countries to continue to give young people and students the chance to benefit from each other’s world leading universities post-exit.</p><p>Under the terms of the proposed Withdrawal Agreement, UK organisations and participants will continue to be able to take part in the Erasmus+ Programme this year and in the future up to the end of the current Multiannual Financial Framework.</p><p>While securing a negotiated deal remains the government’s top priority, we are committed to ensuring that organisations, students and participating staff are prepared in the event of a no deal EU exit. To provide more clarity, we published a new technical notice at the end of January, which provides detailed guidance to organisations and students on the UK’s anticipated participation in the current Erasmus+ programme (2014-20) in the event of no deal. The technical notice, attached, can be found at: <a href="https://bit.ly/2GaP28y" target="_blank">https://bit.ly/2GaP28y</a>.</p><p>As is set out in this notice, the government’s underwrite guarantee will cover the payment of awards to UK organisations for all successful (those that are approved directly by the European Commission or by the National Agency and ratified by the European Commission) Erasmus+ bids. This includes projects and participants that are only informed of their success, or who sign a grant agreement, after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU, and commits to underwrite funding for the entire lifetime of the projects.</p><p>The UK is open to participating in the next Erasmus+ programme (2021-27). We have been considering the draft regulation for the successor scheme carefully and have been actively participating in discussions on this. Ultimately, participation in the successor programme is a matter for negotiations to come about our future relationship with the EU.</p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Greaves more like this
1105656
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The Department for Education (DfE) deals with numerous stakeholders in the higher education (HE) sector. The bodies representing HE providers are set out below.</p><p> </p><p>Universities UK is a membership body that includes the vice chancellors of most UK universities. Its membership can be found at: <a href="https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/about/Pages/member-institutions.aspx" target="_blank">https://www.universitiesuk.ac.uk/about/Pages/member-institutions.aspx</a>;</p><p> </p><p>GuildHE represents a number of smaller and specialist HE providers. Its membership can be found at: <a href="https://guildhe.ac.uk/our-members/" target="_blank">https://guildhe.ac.uk/our-members/</a>; and</p><p> </p><p>Independent HE (formerly Study UK<strong>) </strong>is a UK membership organisation and national representative body for independent providers of HE (alternative providers) and professional training and pathway providers. Its membership can be found at: <a href="http://independenthe.com/members" target="_blank">http://independenthe.com/members</a>.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The DfE also deal with the following self-organised mission groups:</p><p> </p><p>The Russell Group is an association of 24 long-established universities. Its membership can be found at: <a href="https://russellgroup.ac.uk/about/our-universities/" target="_blank">https://russellgroup.ac.uk/about/our-universities/</a>;</p><p> </p><p>Million+ describes itself as a university think-tank, whose members are mainly more recently established universities. Its membership can be found at: <a href="http://www.millionplus.ac.uk/who-we-are/members" target="_blank">http://www.millionplus.ac.uk/who-we-are/members</a>; and</p><p> </p><p>University Alliance represents a number of post92 universities. Its membership can be found at: <a href="https://www.unialliance.ac.uk/alliance-universities/" target="_blank">https://www.unialliance.ac.uk/alliance-universities/</a>.</p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Grocott more like this
1063551
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Under the definitions of “contracting authorities” and “bodies governed by public law” as specified by regulation 2 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015, not all universities fall under these regulations because, for some, the majority of their funding does not come from public sources.</p><p>Where the regulations do apply, it is the universities’ responsibility, as independent contracting authorities, to ensure they comply with their legal obligations. Failure to comply can leave them open to legal remedies, as set out in the regulations, following complaints from aggrieved suppliers.</p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1105826
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The government pays universities directly in respect of the tuition fee loans which are approved for eligible students each year. Students are then legally obliged to repay any tuition fee loans in accordance with the contract they sign when taking out the loan. The Office for National Statistics classifies the money provided by the government to cover tuition fees as a debt for the purposes of the public finances. The government does not ordinarily disclose its legal advice as that is protected by legal professional privilege.</p><p> </p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1104666
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The Higher Education and Research Act 2017 established a new independent regulator in England, the Office for Students (OfS). The act gives the OfS powers to assess the quality and standards applied to higher education by English providers.</p><p>The government has made it clear in guidance to the OfS that grade inflation must be tackled. In their strategy, attached, the OfS includes ensuring “qualifications hold their value over time” as a key objective. In December 2018, the OfS published analysis of changes in degree classifications between 2010-11 and 2016-17, which is attached. This includes data on the University of Surrey and the University of Bradford.</p><p>On 24 March, my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education called for universities to end the steep rise of “unjustifiable” first class degrees which is a threat to the world class reputation of the university sector, and risks undermining the efforts of hard working students. The government expects the OfS, when it has its full range of powers, to challenge those institutions that record an unjustifiable rise in the proportion of top degrees being awarded.</p><p>The OfS’ statutory powers are on course to be strengthened through new regulations due to be laid in Parliament later this year, which will allow the OfS to levy fines of up to £500,000 or 2% of a university’s income (whichever is higher). The UK Standing Committee for Quality Assessment is developing sector-recognised standards to ensure that all degree awards are consistent and fair - due to be completed this academic year. Together, these measures will strengthen the regulator’s ability to challenge universities with unwarranted grade inflation and hold them to account.</p><p>Any university found to be damaging students’ interests could be subject to sanctions such as placing additional conditions on their registration, fines, or in the worst case scenario removing a university’s powers to award degrees.</p><p> </p>
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3869
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Myners more like this
1091620
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The UK has a robust system for the recognition of international qualifications. The UK National Recognition Information Centre (UK NARIC) provides expert advice on behalf of the government on the comparability of international qualifications with those of the UK. Our universities and colleges are supported by the UK NARIC service in making decisions on the eligibility of applicants for places in their courses.</p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Patten more like this
1092456
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The department continues to plan for EU Exit and to ensure that we are best prepared for all potential scenarios. As part of our planning, we are taking steps to ensure that our schools, further education and higher education institutions, and local authorities are similarly prepared.</p><p> </p><p>The department published guidance to provide information and advice to our stakeholders on how to best prepare. The notices include information on the EU Settlement Scheme and on the arrangements that apply to EU, European Economic Area and Swiss citizens arriving after EU Exit. The notices form part of the government's public information campaign which can be viewed at this link: <a href="https://euexit.campaign.gov.uk/" target="_blank">https://euexit.campaign.gov.uk/</a>. This campaign ensures that UK citizens and organisations, EU citizens living in the UK, and UK nation​als living in the EU are well informed about how EU Exit will affect them and about the practical steps they will need to take to be ready for it.</p><p> </p><p>The department has shared guidance with a large number of our stakeholders across the education sector. This includes the document ‘EU exit: no deal preparations for schools in England’, attached[1].</p><p> </p><p>It also includes ‘EU exit: no deal preparations for higher education institutions’ guidance, attached,[2] and ‘EU exit: no deal preparations for further education and apprenticeship providers’ guidance’, also attached[3].</p><p> </p><p>The document ‘EU Exit: No deal preparations for local authority children's services[4]​’, which will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>[1] <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-schools-in-england" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-schools-in-england</a>.</p><p>[2] <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-higher-education-institutions" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-higher-education-institutions</a>.</p><p>[3] <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-further-education-and-apprenticeship-providers" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-further-education-and-apprenticeship-providers</a>.</p><p>[4] <a href="https://www.gov.uk/guidance/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-local-authority-childrens-services-in-england" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/guidance/eu-exit-no-deal-preparations-for-local-authority-childrens-services-in-england</a>.</p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Storey more like this
1019302
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Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>Our Digital Charter aims to make the UK the safest place in the world to be online. As part of this work, we will publish an Online Harms White Paper in winter 2018/19, which will include a range of proposals including setting out how we will ensure that parents, children and other users develop the skills they need to stay safe online.</p><p> </p><p>Government is committed to increasing cyber security capacity across all sectors to ensure that the UK has the right level and blend of skills required to maintain our resilience to cyber threats and be the world’s leading digital economy.</p> more like this
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Taylor of Warwick more like this
1056486
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>We are in close contact and working with the UK National Agency to ensure that in the event that the UK leaves the EU with no agreement in place, the government’s guarantee on Erasmus will cover the payment of awards to UK applicants for all successful Erasmus+ bids submitted before the end of 2020.</p><p>The UK government has repeatedly made clear that it values international exchange and collaboration in education and training as part of its vision for a global Britain, and we believe that the UK and European countries should continue to give young people and students the chance to benefit from each other’s world leading universities post-exit. This is reliant on the UK government reaching agreement with the EU for UK organisations to continue participating in Erasmus+ projects and we are seeking to hold these discussions with the EU.</p><p>We published a new technical notice, attached, at the end of January, which provides detailed guidance to organisations and students on the UK’s anticipated participation in the current Erasmus+ programme (2014 to 2020) in the event of no deal. The notice can also be found at: <a href="https://bit.ly/2GaP28y" target="_blank">https://bit.ly/2GaP28y</a>.</p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Taylor of Warwick more like this
1091634
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The government fully recognises the important contribution that international students make, both economically and culturally, to the UK’s higher education sector.</p><p>On 16 March, the government published its international education strategy, attached, setting out its ambition to increase the value of education exports to £35 billion per year and to increase the total number of international students hosted by UK universities to 600,000 by 2030.</p><p>To provide certainty to prospective EU students, we have confirmed that EU nationals starting courses in the academic year 2019/20 or before will continue to be eligible for undergraduate, postgraduate and Advanced Learner Loan financial support from Student Finance England for the duration of their course, provided that they meet the residency requirements.</p> more like this
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1796
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Taylor of Warwick more like this
1056914
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The government recognises the importance of ensuring there are sufficient skilled graduates to meet industry demand. We are working with different veterinary sector stakeholders, to look at ways of increasing veterinary school capacity and the number of graduates in all UK vet schools going forward.</p><p>The government also subsidises the costs of teaching high-cost subjects such as veterinary medicine, where tuition fee income does not meet the costs of teaching. This is supported through the teaching grant allocated annually to providers via the Office for Students.</p><p>In 2018/19, the recurrent teaching grant provided by the government totals £1,290 million, of which £681 million is specifically targeted at supporting high-cost subjects, including veterinary science. This is currently around £10,000 per veterinary science student.</p><p> </p><p>English higher education providers are autonomous institutions. Their institutional autonomy, which includes decisions as to what they teach, is protected by the Higher Education and Research Act 2017.</p><p>However, the lifting of student number controls in 2015/16 means that there is no longer an artificial cap on the numbers of students that higher education providers are able to recruit, including for veterinary science courses.</p><p> </p><p>There has been progress in the sector in increasing places for veterinary students. The first cohort of students to graduate with the University of Surrey's new veterinary degree is scheduled for July 2019, thereby bringing more domestically trained vets in to the profession. Alongside this, the new Harper and Keele Veterinary School will be commencing its new 5 year degree course in 2020.</p><p> </p>
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unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Trees more like this
1027204
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Department for Education more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>As autonomous and independent organisations, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) determine what support services they provide to their students. Each institution will be best placed to identify the needs of their particular student body. The government places a high priority on how the particular needs of care leavers are addressed by HEIs. Many already provide all-year-round accommodation and bursaries for care leaver students. The Department for Education’s Guidance to the Office for Students (OfS), on completing 2019/20 access and participation plans, specifically identifies care leavers as a key target group whose needs HEIs should address. This is reflected in the OfS own guidance to the sector.</p><p> </p><p>The government recently launched the Care Leaver Covenant, which provides a way for organisations from the public, private and voluntary sectors – including universities – to set out and publicise what support they provide to care leavers. A number of universities have already signed the Covenant, including Leeds, Liverpool John Moores, Huddersfield and Bradford; and we will continue to work closely with the OfS to encourage all universities to sign it.</p>
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1241
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Watson of Invergowrie more like this
1087595
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>The review is taking a systemic view of provision and funding across the post-18 education and funding landscape. The lead departments, including Her Majesty’s Treasury, are continuing to work together to make progress with the review so we can deliver a post-18 education system that is accessible to all, delivers the skills that the country needs and is value for money for both the taxpayer and students.</p> more like this
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1241
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Watson of Invergowrie more like this
1024869
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Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>​Widening participation is a priority for this government. We want to ensure that everyone with the potential to benefit from a university education has the opportunity to do so, regardless of their background or where they grew up. Significant progress has been made in recent years; in 2018, 18-year olds from disadvantaged backgrounds were 52% more likely to enter full-time higher education than in 2009.</p><p> </p><p>However, we have made clear our expectation that the Office for Students (OfS) will challenge universities to make greater progress in widening access and participation.</p><p> </p><p>For example, we have asked the OfS to explore further the use of contextual information in university admissions, such as whether an applicant comes from a low participation neighbourhood or attends a school that does not send many students to university.</p><p> </p><p>​We expect universities to use unconditional offers responsibly. There are cases where the use of unconditional offers can be justified, however the systematic use of unconditional offers is not in the interest of students.</p>
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4256
unstar this property label Biography information for The Lord Bishop of Winchester more like this