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1142434
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>As stated in the published impact assessment, the two fatal collisions identified by HM’s Coroner as having older tyres as a contributory factor provide the evidence base for the monetised benefits for the proposed ban.</p><p> </p><p>The estimated reduction in fatal collisions due to older tyres being removed from use is used to calculate these benefits. In both the fatal collisions the tyres that failed were fitted on the steering axle.</p><p> </p><p>The Department is not aware of any collisions that have occurred as a result of tyre failure due to its age for tyres fitted away from steering axles. In the absence of further evidence, the monetised benefits are estimated to be the same.</p> more like this
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3425
unstar this property label Biography information for Earl Attlee more like this
1142440
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Local stakeholders have championed the reinstatement of the Colne-Skipton railway line and work is currently progressing to assess the proposed scheme and determine if it can be made affordable, will attract sufficient traffic, and is part of the right long-term solution for trans-Pennine rail traffic.</p><p> </p><p>We expect to receive the results later this year to inform a decision as to whether the scheme should progress to the ‘develop’ stage of the Government’s Rail Network Enhancements Pipeline. This is part of our new approach to rail enhancements to ensure we address the needs of passengers and freight, and that funding commitments appropriately reflect the stage of development of schemes.</p> more like this
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2569
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Greaves more like this
1142461
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is committed to exploring innovative ideas and processes for more environmentally friendly ways of constructing, repairing and maintaining road surfaces. The Department for Transport is aware of a number of initiatives, both here in England and overseas, in which recycled plastic and other waste product materials are added as a binding mix to asphalt.</p><p> </p><p>As part of the Live Labs research programme, in conjunction with the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning and Transport (ADEPT) and private partners, the Department for Transport announced in January 2019 funding of £1.6 million to Cumbria County Council to extend a trial for the selection and testing of recycled plastic in surfacing and structural treatments on the local road network. This trial will assess the suitability and durability of the plastics additives from minor patching work and pothole repairs through to major resurfacing.</p><p> </p><p>Technological innovation in road maintenance processes can also improve efficiency and reduce waste by recycling existing road material. Highways England is taking such an approach in reconstructing a 10-mile stretch of the A1(M) southbound carriageway between Leeming and the Ripon interchange.</p><p> </p><p>Information on road surface materials can be found in the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges: volume 2, part of a suite of documents published by Highways England.</p><p> </p>
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4230
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Randerson more like this
1142462
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is committed to exploring innovative ideas and processes for more environmentally friendly ways of constructing, repairing and maintaining road surfaces. The Department for Transport is aware of a number of initiatives, both here in England and overseas, in which recycled plastic and other waste product materials are added as a binding mix to asphalt.</p><p> </p><p>As part of the Live Labs research programme, in conjunction with the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning and Transport (ADEPT) and private partners, the Department for Transport announced in January 2019 funding of £1.6 million to Cumbria County Council to extend a trial for the selection and testing of recycled plastic in surfacing and structural treatments on the local road network. This trial will assess the suitability and durability of the plastics additives from minor patching work and pothole repairs through to major resurfacing.</p><p> </p><p>Technological innovation in road maintenance processes can also improve efficiency and reduce waste by recycling existing road material. Highways England is taking such an approach in reconstructing a 10-mile stretch of the A1(M) southbound carriageway between Leeming and the Ripon interchange.</p><p> </p><p>Information on road surface materials can be found in the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges: volume 2, part of a suite of documents published by Highways England.</p><p> </p>
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4230
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Randerson more like this
1142463
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is committed to exploring innovative ideas and processes for more environmentally friendly ways of constructing, repairing and maintaining road surfaces. The Department for Transport is aware of a number of initiatives, both here in England and overseas, in which recycled plastic and other waste product materials are added as a binding mix to asphalt.</p><p> </p><p>As part of the Live Labs research programme, in conjunction with the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning and Transport (ADEPT) and private partners, the Department for Transport announced in January 2019 funding of £1.6 million to Cumbria County Council to extend a trial for the selection and testing of recycled plastic in surfacing and structural treatments on the local road network. This trial will assess the suitability and durability of the plastics additives from minor patching work and pothole repairs through to major resurfacing.</p><p> </p><p>Technological innovation in road maintenance processes can also improve efficiency and reduce waste by recycling existing road material. Highways England is taking such an approach in reconstructing a 10-mile stretch of the A1(M) southbound carriageway between Leeming and the Ripon interchange.</p><p> </p><p>Information on road surface materials can be found in the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges: volume 2, part of a suite of documents published by Highways England.</p><p> </p>
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4230
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Randerson more like this
1142464
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government is committed to exploring innovative ideas and processes for more environmentally friendly ways of constructing, repairing and maintaining road surfaces. The Department for Transport is aware of a number of initiatives, both here in England and overseas, in which recycled plastic and other waste product materials are added as a binding mix to asphalt.</p><p> </p><p>As part of the Live Labs research programme, in conjunction with the Association of Directors of Environment, Economy, Planning and Transport (ADEPT) and private partners, the Department for Transport announced in January 2019 funding of £1.6 million to Cumbria County Council to extend a trial for the selection and testing of recycled plastic in surfacing and structural treatments on the local road network. This trial will assess the suitability and durability of the plastics additives from minor patching work and pothole repairs through to major resurfacing.</p><p> </p><p>Technological innovation in road maintenance processes can also improve efficiency and reduce waste by recycling existing road material. Highways England is taking such an approach in reconstructing a 10-mile stretch of the A1(M) southbound carriageway between Leeming and the Ripon interchange.</p><p> </p><p>Information on road surface materials can be found in the Design Manual for Roads and Bridges: volume 2, part of a suite of documents published by Highways England.</p><p> </p>
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4230
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Randerson more like this
1142465
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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unstar this property answer text <p>In June this year, Network Rail published a Long-term Deployment Plan illustrating how the Network Rail regions will gradually migrate to digital signalling technology over a 30 year period starting from 2024.</p><p> </p> more like this
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4230
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Randerson more like this
1141903
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Neither Highways England, nor the Department, holds the statistics requested. The Department recently launched a consultation on proposals to ban tyres aged 10 years or older on heavy goods vehicles, heavy trailers, buses, coaches and minibuses. I encourage all interested parties to provide feedback on the consultation.</p><p> </p><p>Expert opinion from the Coroner’s inquests into two fatal road collisions and independent research commissioned by the Department provided evidence to support our proposals. The proposals in the consultation builds on existing roadworthiness guidance that advises against the use of tyres older than ten years on buses, coaches and heavy goods vehicles, except on a rear axle as part of a twin wheel arrangement.</p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
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3425
unstar this property label Biography information for Earl Attlee more like this
1141906
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>No such assessment has been made, however the Secretary of State's ‘Statutory Guidance to Local Authorities on the Civil Enforcement of Parking Contraventions’ advises on the immobilisation/removal of vehicles. Very few authorities now use immobilisation as it prevents law abiding motorists from using valuable kerb space. The Department is of the view that it should only be used in limited circumstances. Where a vehicle is causing a hazard or obstruction the enforcement authority should remove rather than immobilise. The statutory guidance advises that when parked in contravention, a persistent evader’s vehicle should be subject to the strongest possible enforcement following the issue of the penalty charge notice and confirmation of persistent evader status.</p> more like this
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2483
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Bradshaw more like this
1141924
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Department for Transport more like this
unstar this property answering dept id 27 remove filter
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Government Car Service (GCS) drivers are given clear instruction not to keep their engines running while parked. Regular reminders are sent out on this subject.</p><p> </p><p>GCS is moving towards low and zero emission vehicles to reduce carbon and nitrogen oxide emissions and the Department is working with them to speed this up.</p><p> </p><p>Cars operated by the Metropolitan Police Service also park in New Palace Yard but I am unable to comment on the operational instructions given to their drivers.</p><p> </p> more like this
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4297
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb more like this