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1014643
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The Government recognises the importance of effective and timely handling of correspondence with members of the House of Lords. Government departments should aim to provide a substantive response to routine correspondence within a maximum of 20 working days. However, sometimes circumstances dictate that it will not be possible to provide a response within this timeframe. In such instances, departments are advised to issue a ‘holding’ response until a more substantive response can be provided.</p><p>The Cabinet Office publishes an annual report detailing departmental performance in the handling of correspondence from members of both Houses. Lord Young of Cookham set out the 2017 performance figures in a Written Statement on 26 June 2018 (HLWS771). The 2018 performance figures will be published in summer 2019.</p> more like this
star this property question first answered
remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2018-12-10T16:30:31.02Z
star this property tabling member
2569
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Greaves more like this
106156
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The process for tabling oral questions was considered in detail in the 2012-13 session. In response to concerns raised about the current “first-come-first-served” system - including a concern about the requirement to queue raised by my Noble Friend, Lady Sharples - the Procedure Committee proposed the introduction of a ballot in its place (Procedure Committee, 3rd Report, Session 2012-13). The House remitted the issue back to the Procedure Committee for further consideration (HL Deb 9 Jan 2013, cols 145-172). <br><br>That further review did not identify a clear consensus as to whether a ballot was preferred to the “first-come-first-served” system (see Procedure Committee, 5th Report, Session 2012-13; see also HL Deb 24 April 2013, cols 1406-1417). <br><br>I know that strong views persist on both sides of the argument about this issue. I will write to the Chairman of the Procedure Committee on my Noble Friend’s behalf to suggest that the matter might be discussed at a future meeting of the Procedure Committee.</p><p> </p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-18T14:34:08.47Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-18T14:34:08.47Z
star this property tabling member
1665
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Avebury more like this
143445
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>This information is not held centrally; it could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-21T14:44:34.197Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-21T14:44:34.197Z
star this property tabling member
4202
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Lexden more like this
156522
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>It is the responsibility of individual ministers to decide what answers they give to Questions for Written Answer (QWAs), and they are of course accountable to the House for those answers. That direct accountability is important: that is why Ministers in this House must provide personally signed answers to members. The Ministerial Code states that <em>“It is of paramount importance that Ministers give accurate and truthful information to Parliament”.<br><br></em>As Leader of the House I have a particular responsibility to encourage Ministers and their departments to be punctual in answering written questions. My office immediately approach departments who have not responded to questions after 10 working days, and remain in contact with them until the questions are answered. At the end of this Session I will publish data on the annual performance of departments on their promptness in dealing with QWAs.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-03T12:49:49.887Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-03T12:49:49.887Z
star this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
226856
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>I take very seriously my responsibility as Leader of the House to encourage Ministers to be punctual in answering written questions. My office immediately approach departments who have not responded to questions after 10 working days, and remain in contact with them until the questions are answered. This process was followed with HM Treasury for the 12 questions that remained unanswered after 10 working days on 11 March. All of those questions have now been answered. At the end of this Session I will publish data on each department’s promptness in dealing with Questions for Written Answer to allow for proper scrutiny of their performance.</p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-24T13:41:23.26Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-24T13:41:23.26Z
star this property tabling member
883
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Jopling more like this
227330
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>As Leader of the House, I have a particular responsibility to encourage departments to be punctual in answering written questions, but the content of each answer is a matter for the minister concerned. All Ministers are accountable to the House for those answers. That direct accountability is important: that is why Ministers in this House must provide personally signed answers to members.</p><p> </p><p>To inform Ministers in answering questions put to them, the Ministerial Code says that “It is of paramount importance that Ministers give accurate and truthful information to Parliament”. It also makes clear that “Ministers should be as open as possible with Parliament and the public, refusing to provide information only when disclosure would not be in the public interest”. In addition, the longstanding rules of this House on Questions for Written Answer (rules that the House reaffirmed in agreeing to the Procedure Committee’s 5<sup>th</sup> Report of the 2014-15 Session) set out that all answers should be complete and comprehensible.</p><p> </p><p>If any member has particular concerns about a response that they have received that they consider does not adhere to these rules, I would encourage them to raise it with me directly.</p><p> </p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-24T13:45:04.12Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-24T13:45:04.12Z
star this property tabling member
3596
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Gardner of Parkes more like this
227995
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>As Leader of the House, I have a particular responsibility to encourage departments to be punctual in answering written questions, but the content of each answer is a matter for the minister concerned. All Ministers are accountable to the House for those answers. That direct accountability is important: that is why Ministers in this House must provide personally signed answers to members.</p><p> </p><p>To inform Ministers in answering questions put to them, the Ministerial Code says that “It is of paramount importance that Ministers give accurate and truthful information to Parliament”. It also makes clear that “Ministers should be as open as possible with Parliament and the public, refusing to provide information only when disclosure would not be in the public interest”. In addition, the longstanding rules of this House on Questions for Written Answer (rules that the House reaffirmed in agreeing to the Procedure Committee’s 5<sup>th</sup> Report of the 2014-15 Session) set out that all answers should be complete and comprehensible.</p><p> </p><p>If any member has particular concerns about a response that they have received that they consider does not adhere to these rules, I would encourage them to raise it with me directly.</p><p> </p>
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-03-24T13:45:04.013Zmore like thismore than 2015-03-24T13:45:04.013Z
star this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
387758
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WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The second largest opposition party is neither formally defined nor given specific speaking rights by the Standing Orders of the House or the Companion to the Standing Orders. The Companion to Standing Orders does, however, set out several areas where the “opposition front benches” have the right to speak for longer than backbenchers or have rights to speak at specific points in proceedings.<br><br>Of the political parties represented in the House, only the Official Opposition and the Liberal Democrat group operate frontbenches of a size that permits them to shadow each Government department. It is for that reason that the definition of “opposition frontbenches” that applied in practice before the 2010 Parliament has been reverted to in this Parliament. <br><br>It remains open to any member who wishes to propose a change to current arrangements to make representations to me and/or make a submission to the Procedure Committee.</p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T16:47:20.41Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T16:47:20.41Z
star this property tabling member
499
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Campbell-Savours more like this
387759
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
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answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The second largest opposition party is neither formally defined nor given specific speaking rights by the Standing Orders of the House or the Companion to the Standing Orders. The Companion to Standing Orders does, however, set out several areas where the “opposition front benches” have the right to speak for longer than backbenchers or have rights to speak at specific points in proceedings.<br><br>Of the political parties represented in the House, only the Official Opposition and the Liberal Democrat group operate frontbenches of a size that permits them to shadow each Government department. It is for that reason that the definition of “opposition frontbenches” that applied in practice before the 2010 Parliament has been reverted to in this Parliament. <br><br>It remains open to any member who wishes to propose a change to current arrangements to make representations to me and/or make a submission to the Procedure Committee.</p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T16:47:20.49Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T16:47:20.49Z
star this property tabling member
499
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Campbell-Savours more like this
387760
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property answer text <p>The second largest opposition party is neither formally defined nor given specific speaking rights by the Standing Orders of the House or the Companion to the Standing Orders. The Companion to Standing Orders does, however, set out several areas where the “opposition front benches” have the right to speak for longer than backbenchers or have rights to speak at specific points in proceedings.<br><br>Of the political parties represented in the House, only the Official Opposition and the Liberal Democrat group operate frontbenches of a size that permits them to shadow each Government department. It is for that reason that the definition of “opposition frontbenches” that applied in practice before the 2010 Parliament has been reverted to in this Parliament. <br><br>It remains open to any member who wishes to propose a change to current arrangements to make representations to me and/or make a submission to the Procedure Committee.</p> more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T16:47:20.583Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T16:47:20.583Z
star this property tabling member
499
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Campbell-Savours more like this