Linked Data API

Show Search Form

Search Results

637761
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The information requested is provided in the quarterly offender management statistics publication, which is published on gov.uk. A copy of the information is included in the attached table.</p> more like this
641843
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Under current guidance[1], some types of degree-awarding powers (i.e. for institutions in the further education sector and institutions that are not funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England) are made on a six-yearly renewable basis. Therefore, these powers are not automatically renewed.</p><p>As set out in published guidance[2], in circumstances such as a change of ownership or control, an assessment is made of any provider with university title or degree-awarding powers to determine whether the change would affect the continuing eligibility of that provider to hold university title or degree-awarding powers.</p><p> </p><p>[1] ‘<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/526813/BIS-15-525-degree-awarding-powers.pdf" target="_blank">Guidance for higher education providers: criteria and process for applying for taught degree awarding powers and research degree awarding powers</a>’</p><p>[2] ‘<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/526813/BIS-15-525-degree-awarding-powers.pdf" target="_blank">Guidance for higher education providers: criteria and process for applying for taught degree awarding powers and research degree awarding powers</a>’ and ‘Guidance for higher education providers for applying for university title and university college title’</p>
641844
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>No English institutions have had their degree-awarding powers or university title removed during this period, other than indirectly via merger with other institutions or through similar structural changes.</p><p> </p> more like this
641846
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The criteria for obtaining University Title in England are not legislative, but are set out in departmental guidance (‘Guidance for higher education providers for applying for university title and university college title’ is available at <a href="http://www.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.gov.uk</a>, by searching for its title). These are the same regardless of whether a provider is publicly funded or not. One of the criteria is having taught degree-awarding powers. It is therefore not possible to obtain University Title without having degree-awarding powers.</p><p>If the Secretary of State is satisfied that the criteria have been met and that a provider’s preferred name is not likely to be confusing, the next steps will vary depending on the constitution of the organisation and/or its funding status. In general:</p><p>- Publicly funded higher education providers can obtain University Title from the Privy Council under either Section 77 of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992, or Section 39 of the Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998. This usually takes the form of amendments to the provider’s governing documents to reflect the new name.</p><p>- Alternative Providers cannot obtain University Title via the Privy Council, but can instead do so under the Companies Act. The criteria as set out in the guidance still apply. “University” is a sensitive word under company law<sup><sup>[1]</sup></sup>, which means permission from the Secretary of State under the Companies Act 2006, following a non-objection letter from the Department for Education, is required before it can be used in a business or company name.</p><p>There are limited circumstances where a business may be permitted to use the word “university” in their company or business name, without obtaining University Title. For example, a student union may be given such permission. However, the use of a name in this way does not convey the status of a university.</p><p> </p><p>[1] Company, Limited Liability Partnerships and Business Names (Sensitive Words and Expressions) Regulations 2014 (S.I. 2014/3140)</p>
641847
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>The term “university” is not defined in legislation. The criteria and processes for obtaining University Title are set out in published guidance, ‘Guidance for higher education providers for applying for university title and university college title’, which the department maintains and updates as necessary.</p><p>There are some references in legislation. Section 77(4) of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 provides that any educational institution that includes the word “university” in its name and is permitted to do so in accordance with section 77(1) is to be treated as a university for all purposes, unless in that name ”university” is immediately followed by the word “college” or “collegiate”. Section 39 of the Education Reform Act 1988 prohibits an institution from unauthorised use of the word “university” in its name in relation to any educational services it offers.</p><p>There is also a partial definition of “university” in Section 90(3) of the Further and Higher Education Act 1992 and in Section 235 of the Education Reform Act 1988.</p><p> </p><p> </p>
651843
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>There are two legislative restrictions in place. “University” is a sensitive word under company law<sup>[1]</sup>, which means permission from the Secretary of State under the Companies Act 2006, following a non-objection letter from the Department for Education, is required before it can be used in a business or company name. Also, under section 39 of the Teaching and Higher Education Act 1998, an institution cannot offer educational services under a name which includes “university” unless authorised by Act or Royal Charter or approved by the Privy Counsel.</p><p>[1] Company, Limited Liability Partnerships and Business Names (Sensitive Words and Expressions) Regulations 2014 (S.I. 2014/3140)</p> more like this
1002480
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>​The department will be consulting on the impact that these costs will impose on all institutions covered by the Teachers’ Pension Scheme, including those in the higher education (HE) sector, and will decide what action should be taken.</p><p>At present, the department proposes to provide funding to schools, including state-funded, non-maintained special schools and independent special schools to cover increased pensions costs to ensure that funding is allocated where it is most needed.</p><p>​This includes proposed funding for those further education (FE) providers obliged to offer the Teachers’ Pension Scheme, consisting of general FE colleges, sixth form colleges, designated institutions (including the new designated institutions that form part of HE institution group structures), specialist post-16 institutions and adult &amp; community learning providers (local authority provision).</p> more like this
1002481
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>For the financial year 2019-20, the changes will be implemented from 1 September 2019 for which the department estimates that £1.1 billion more will need to be put into the Teachers’ Pension Scheme by employers to ensure teachers’ pensions remain generous and attractive to the profession. Of the estimated £1.1 billion, affected higher education institutions are expected to put in £80 million.</p> more like this
1010103
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>Universities are autonomous from government, and consequently control the criteria used to determine admissions. We are aware that the Russell Group, which comprises 24 of the UK’s leading universities, publishes guidance designed to assist applicants in identifying the A level subjects most likely to facilitate entry to one of their member universities. From engagement with the Russell Group, we understand they are currently reviewing their guidance. The department recognises the importance of arts subjects, including music, and students’ ability to make informed choices is at the heart of our recent reforms to higher education. We are increasing the information available to students to ensure they can make informed choices about what and where to study.</p> more like this
1010125
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
unstar this property house id 2 more like this
star this property type
WrittenParliamentaryQuestion
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property answer text <p>We have made clear in the recent political agreement (published on 14 November) that the UK remains committed to continued cooperation with the EU on education. In the attached government white paper, ‘The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union[1]’, we also set out our desire to facilitate mobility for students and young people, enabling them to continue to benefit from world leading universities and the cultural experiences the UK and EU Member States – including France – have to offer.</p><p>With the caveat that “nothing is agreed until everything is agreed”, in principle the UK will continue to benefit from all EU programmes, including Erasmus+, until the end of the current budget plan, and applications should continue as normal. The UK is also open to exploring participation in the successor scheme to the current Erasmus+ Programme. We welcome the attached proposals for the 2021-2027 successor scheme to Erasmus+ (published on 30 May), and are considering these carefully; we will continue to participate in discussions on these proposals while we remain in the EU. Ultimately, UK participation in the successor programme is a matter for negotiations on our future relationship with the EU.</p><p>[1] The white paper can be found via this link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/725288/The_future_relationship_between_the_United_Kingdom_and_the_European_Union.pdf" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/725288/The_future_relationship_between_the_United_Kingdom_and_the_European_Union.pdf</a>.</p>