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1135596
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-28more like thismore than 2019-06-28
star this property answering body
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept id 10 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property hansard heading Gambling: Children remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to safeguard children against exposure to gambling opportunities associated with (a) in-app and (b) in-game purchases on gaming consoles and mobile devices. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Easington more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Grahame Morris more like this
star this property uin 270805 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-03more like thismore than 2019-07-03
star this property answer text <p>Protecting children and the vulnerable from being harmed or exploited by gambling is a core objective of the Gambling Commission, as the regulator for gambling in Great Britain, and a priority for the government. There are also strong protections in place for children who play video games.</p><p> </p><p>The Pan European Game Information (PEGI) ratings system used to classify video games, will not award ratings to products that allow gambling, significantly restricting their ability to be sold in the UK. Where a game contains elements that could teach or encourage gambling like behaviour, it will be awarded a minimum PEGI 12 rating and will also have a gambling pictogram label applied to alert parents to the content.</p><p> </p><p>Additionally, most video games and mobile platforms come with a range of parental control tools that can include allowing parents to block games based on PEGI age ratings, disable in-game purchases and monitor and place limits on use. PEGI provides more information here https://pegi.info/parental-controls.</p><p> </p><p>Where licensed online gambling is offered, operators are required to verify the age of a consumer before they can deposit money and gamble, or access free-to-play demo games.</p><p> </p><p>The Gambling Commission has strong powers and has shown it will take action where there are breaches of the rules - in 2017, it successfully prosecuted the FutGalaxy website for offering illegal gambling with in-game items – known as skins gambling.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
star this property answering member printed Mims Davies remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-03T11:23:55.147Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-03T11:23:55.147Z
star this property answering member
4513
star this property label Biography information for Mims Davies remove filter
star this property tabling member
3973
unstar this property label Biography information for Grahame Morris more like this
1037162
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-01-07more like thismore than 2019-01-07
star this property answering body
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept id 10 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property hansard heading Gambling: Children remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps his Department is taking to limit children’s exposure to gambling adverts during sporting events. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr Rosena Allin-Khan more like this
star this property uin 205999 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-01-15more like thismore than 2019-01-15
star this property answer text <p>There are strict controls on the content of all gambling advertisements, including broadcast adverts and online. Gambling operators who advertise in the UK must comply with the advertising codes, which aim to ensure gambling advertising does not target or appeal particularly to children or young people. TV adverts must be pre-cleared by Clearcast and the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) acts on complaints and proactively checks the media to take action against misleading, harmful or offensive advertisements. The Gambling Industry Code for Socially Responsible Advertising requires all TV and print adverts to carry an 18+ or ‘no under 18s’ message.</p><p> </p><p>As with advertising, sponsorship arrangements must be socially responsible and must never be targeted at children. Operators’ logos must not appear on any commercial merchandising which is designed for children, including replica football shirts in children’s sizes.</p><p> </p><p>Our Review of Gaming Machines and Social Responsibility Measures set out a package of measures to strengthen protections further. These include tougher guidance from the Committees of Advertising Practice (CAP) on protecting vulnerable people, with further guidance on children and young people due soon, tougher sanctions for operators who breach advertising codes and a multi-million pound safer gambling advertising campaign, which will include responsible gambling messages around sports.</p><p> </p><p>The gambling industry and broadcasters have announced additional initiatives to limit the advertising seen around sport. The Industry Group for Responsible Gambling will amend its advertising code to include a ‘whistle-to-whistle’ ban on all TV betting adverts during pre-watershed live sport, including for 5 minutes before and after play. It has announced that the changes are expected to come into effect in summer. Sky will also offer customers the option to opt out of TV gambling adverts from 2020. These are welcome steps by industry to respond to public concerns, and it is important that all those who benefit from gambling advertising think about how they can be socially responsible. We will continue to monitor issues around advertising and consider any new evidence carefully.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
star this property answering member printed Mims Davies remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-01-15T15:46:36.28Zmore like thismore than 2019-01-15T15:46:36.28Z
star this property answering member
4513
star this property label Biography information for Mims Davies remove filter
star this property tabling member
4573
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Rosena Allin-Khan more like this
1027303
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-12-17more like thismore than 2018-12-17
star this property answering body
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept id 10 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property hansard heading Gambling: Children remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has had made of the relationship between 16 year olds purchasing scratch cards and gambling addiction in later life. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Edgbaston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Preet Kaur Gill more like this
star this property uin 202834 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-12-20more like thismore than 2018-12-20
star this property answer text <p>When the conclusions of the Government’s Gambling Review were announced in May 2018, the Government said it would consider whether 16 remained an appropriate age limit to play all National Lottery products, including scratchcards, as part of work on the next licence competition. The evidence in this area is currently being reviewed and analysed, including the number of young people who play National Lottery games and whether participation leads to problem gambling behaviours in later life.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
star this property answering member printed Mims Davies remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN 202835 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-12-20T13:38:11.007Zmore like thismore than 2018-12-20T13:38:11.007Z
star this property answering member
4513
star this property label Biography information for Mims Davies remove filter
star this property tabling member
4603
unstar this property label Biography information for Preet Kaur Gill more like this
1020337
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-12-05more like thismore than 2018-12-05
star this property answering body
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept id 10 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Digital, Culture, Media and Sport more like this
star this property hansard heading Gambling: Children remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what information he holds on the number and proportion of (a) children who gamble by buying scratchcards and (b) problem gamblers among 16 to 18 year olds who buy scratchcards. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency West Bromwich East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tom Watson more like this
star this property uin 199336 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-12-14more like thismore than 2018-12-14
star this property answer text <p>The legal age for playing National Lottery scratchcards is 16. The Gambling Commission’s Young People &amp; Gambling 2018 report surveyed 2,865 children aged 11-16 years old in schools in England, Scotland and Wales. It reported that 2% of those aged 11-15 years old (45 individuals) had spent money on scratchcards in the past 7 days. Of the 11-15 year olds who have bought National Lottery products (National Lottery tickets or scratchcards) in the past, 62% said a parent or guardian handed over the money at the till.</p><p> </p><p>Data from the Health Survey for England and Scotland 2015 and Problem Gambling Survey Wales 2015 indicates that none of the 16-17 year olds surveyed who played scratchcards were classified as problem gamblers. This is from a sample of 246 16-17 year olds, of whom 53 who had bought scratchcards in the last 12 months. The Gambling Commission also carries out regular telephone surveys, which again found that there were there were no problem gamblers amongst 16-17 and 16-18 year old scratchcard players surveyed. However, in both age groups sample sizes were small, and findings should be treated with caution.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Eastleigh more like this
star this property answering member printed Mims Davies remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-12-14T13:20:29.923Zmore like thismore than 2018-12-14T13:20:29.923Z
star this property answering member
4513
star this property label Biography information for Mims Davies remove filter
star this property tabling member
1463
unstar this property label Biography information for Tom Watson more like this