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765442
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Pensions: EU Countries more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many UK citizens are in receipt of a pension from another EU member state. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Perth and North Perthshire more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Pete Wishart more like this
star this property uin 105635 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-13more like thismore than 2017-10-13
star this property answer text <p>The information requested is not available.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-13T12:02:33.09Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-13T12:02:33.09Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
1440
unstar this property label Biography information for Pete Wishart more like this
765395
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Prison Officers: Retirement more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what impact assessment his Department carried out before raising the pension age to 68 for prison officers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
star this property uin 105698 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-11more like thismore than 2017-10-11
star this property answer text <p>HM Treasury published an Impact Assessment in September 2012 on the Public Service Pensions Bill, which later became the Public Service Pensions Act 2013. This Act links the Normal Pension Age for public sector workers (including prison officers) to the State Pension Age. Under current legislation, the State Pension Age will rise to 68 for those born 6 April 1978 onwards. The justification for linking the two ages is to keep the Normal Pension Age for public service schemes in line with developments in longevity, ensuring the sustainability of the schemes and managing the risk to the taxpayer. The UK Government had extensive engagement with the Scottish Government and with trade unions before the reformed public service schemes, as outlined in the Act, were introduced in 2015.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Regular consideration of State Pension age is necessary to ensure that the pensions system remains sustainable as life expectancy grows. The first Government review of State Pension age was published earlier this year, in line with the framework introduced by the 2014 Pensions Act for regular and structured reviews of State Pension age to be held at least once every six years. The review can be accessed here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630065/state-pension-age-review-final-report.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630065/state-pension-age-review-final-report.pdf</a></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105699 more like this
105700 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-11T16:34:27.013Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-11T16:34:27.013Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4365
unstar this property label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
765396
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Prison Officers: Retirement more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions his Department had with trade unions in (a) Scotland and (b) the rest of the UK before raising the pension age to 68 for prison officers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
star this property uin 105699 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-11more like thismore than 2017-10-11
star this property answer text <p>HM Treasury published an Impact Assessment in September 2012 on the Public Service Pensions Bill, which later became the Public Service Pensions Act 2013. This Act links the Normal Pension Age for public sector workers (including prison officers) to the State Pension Age. Under current legislation, the State Pension Age will rise to 68 for those born 6 April 1978 onwards. The justification for linking the two ages is to keep the Normal Pension Age for public service schemes in line with developments in longevity, ensuring the sustainability of the schemes and managing the risk to the taxpayer. The UK Government had extensive engagement with the Scottish Government and with trade unions before the reformed public service schemes, as outlined in the Act, were introduced in 2015.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Regular consideration of State Pension age is necessary to ensure that the pensions system remains sustainable as life expectancy grows. The first Government review of State Pension age was published earlier this year, in line with the framework introduced by the 2014 Pensions Act for regular and structured reviews of State Pension age to be held at least once every six years. The review can be accessed here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630065/state-pension-age-review-final-report.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630065/state-pension-age-review-final-report.pdf</a></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105698 more like this
105700 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-11T16:34:27.09Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-11T16:34:27.09Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4365
unstar this property label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
765397
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Prison Officers: Retirement more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what discussions his Department had with the Scottish Government before raising the pension age to 68 for prison officers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Airdrie and Shotts more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Neil Gray more like this
star this property uin 105700 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-11more like thismore than 2017-10-11
star this property answer text <p>HM Treasury published an Impact Assessment in September 2012 on the Public Service Pensions Bill, which later became the Public Service Pensions Act 2013. This Act links the Normal Pension Age for public sector workers (including prison officers) to the State Pension Age. Under current legislation, the State Pension Age will rise to 68 for those born 6 April 1978 onwards. The justification for linking the two ages is to keep the Normal Pension Age for public service schemes in line with developments in longevity, ensuring the sustainability of the schemes and managing the risk to the taxpayer. The UK Government had extensive engagement with the Scottish Government and with trade unions before the reformed public service schemes, as outlined in the Act, were introduced in 2015.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Regular consideration of State Pension age is necessary to ensure that the pensions system remains sustainable as life expectancy grows. The first Government review of State Pension age was published earlier this year, in line with the framework introduced by the 2014 Pensions Act for regular and structured reviews of State Pension age to be held at least once every six years. The review can be accessed here: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630065/state-pension-age-review-final-report.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/630065/state-pension-age-review-final-report.pdf</a></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105698 more like this
105699 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-11T16:34:27.137Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-11T16:34:27.137Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4365
unstar this property label Biography information for Neil Gray more like this
765480
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: British Nationals Abroad more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people over 100-years old receive the UK state pension in each country outside the UK. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 105738 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-13more like thismore than 2017-10-13
star this property answer text <p>The table below provides a response to your question from DWP’s State Pension administrative data on the number of State Pension recipients aged over 100 years old. There are known issues with the quality of this data due to historical operational processes which mean that some cases remain on the administrative data although they are no longer in payment. Additional management information held within the department indicates that the in-payment caseload for Yemen in particular is much lower than that presented below.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Caseload</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Abroad - Not known</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Alderney</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Australia</p></td><td><p>210</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Austria</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Bangladesh</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Barbados</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Belgium</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Canada</p></td><td><p>140</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Cyprus</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Denmark</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Djibouti</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Dom Commonwealth (Dominica)</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>France</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Germany</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Gibraltar</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Greece</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Grenada</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Guernsey</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Hungary</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>India</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Ireland</p></td><td><p>50</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Israel</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Italy</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Jamaica</p></td><td><p>40</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Jersey</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Kenya</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Luxembourg</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Malta</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Netherlands</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>New Zealand</p></td><td><p>70</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Norway</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Pakistan</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Poland</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Portugal</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Republic of Lithuania</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Republic of Yemen</p></td><td><p>30</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>South Africa</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Spain</p></td><td><p>20</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>St Vincent &amp; Grenadines</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Sweden</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Switzerland</p></td><td><p>10</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Tanzania</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>United Arab Emirates</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>USA</p></td><td><p>100</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Virgin Islands (USA)</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Zimbabwe</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><em>Source: DWP Work and Pensions Longitudinal Study, February 2017.</em></p><p><em>Caseload figures have been rounded to the nearest 10.</em></p><p><em>Caseloads identified with ‘-‘ are negligible, but non-zero.</em></p><p><em>Caseloads in WPLS can include suspended cases which are no longer in payment.</em></p><p> </p><p>Note:</p><ul><li>DWP has reviewed the operational process for keeping records no longer in payment on the system and improvements are underway to close down these cases.</li></ul><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-13T12:00:34.667Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-13T12:00:34.667Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
765726
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by one year back to the age of 66 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105835 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.64Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.64Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765727
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by two years back to the age of 65 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105836 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.72Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.72Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765731
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by three years back to the age of 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105837 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.783Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.783Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765732
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by fours years back to the age of 63 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105838 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.843Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.843Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765729
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by five years back to the age of 62 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105839 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.907Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.907Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this