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765442
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Pensions: EU Countries more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many UK citizens are in receipt of a pension from another EU member state. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Perth and North Perthshire more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Pete Wishart more like this
star this property uin 105635 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-13more like thismore than 2017-10-13
star this property answer text <p>The information requested is not available.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-13T12:02:33.09Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
1440
unstar this property label Biography information for Pete Wishart more like this
765726
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by one year back to the age of 66 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105835 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.64Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.64Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765727
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by two years back to the age of 65 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105836 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.72Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.72Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765731
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by three years back to the age of 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105837 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.783Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.783Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765732
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by fours years back to the age of 63 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105838 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.843Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.843Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765729
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by five years back to the age of 62 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105839 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105840 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.907Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.907Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765730
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by six years back to the age of 61 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105840 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105841 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.987Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:34.987Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765728
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if he will estimate the cost to the public purse of reducing the pension age of women by seven years back to the age of 60 from the 2017-18 tax year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Belfast South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Emma Little Pengelly more like this
star this property uin 105841 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The State Pension age is currently 64 for women and 65 for men.</p><p>The State Pension age is due to reach 67 for both genders by March 2028.</p><p> </p><p>We do not have an estimate of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 61, 62, 63 or 64 from the 2017-18 tax year. This could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><p>In the longer-term we estimate that reducing the state pension age by one year compared to the legislated timetable might lead to an increase in expenditure on state pensions of around 0.3% of GDP.</p><p> </p><p>The Department has published a number of documents that could be used to provide illustrative estimates of the costs of some changes for some time periods.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 60, the Department submitted written evidence to the Work and Pensions Select Committee in February 2016, producing an illustrative estimate of the costs of reversing the current legislated increases in women’s State Pension age until 2020/21 – i.e. keeping women’s State Pension age at 60 for women born in the 1950s. The illustrative estimate (illustrative as it was based on a number of high-level assumptions) indicated that it would cost £9.8 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) in the tax year 2017/18 were female state pension age to be 60 instead of the currently legislated state pension age in 2017/18, of between 63¾ and 64½. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 in 2020/21 would cost £14.3 billion (in 2015/16 price terms) compared to the legislated state pension age that year, of between 65¾ and 66. Keeping female State Pension age at 60 beyond 2020/21 would incur further costs.</p><p> </p><p>In terms of an estimate for the state pension age of women being reduced to 65, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2011 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 65 to 66 by five and a half years from 2024-26 to complete by October 2020. For example, in 2023/24, when State Pension age will be 66 under the legislated timetable, compared to 65 under the previous timetable, expenditure on state pensions is expected to be £5.9 billion lower (in 2011/12 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 65 beyond 2026 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/181462/pensions-bill-2011-ia-annexa.pdf</a></p><p> </p><p>In terms of for the cost of the state pension age of women being reduced to 66, the impact assessment for the Pensions Act 2014 illustrates the estimated savings of bringing forward the rise in state pension age for both genders from 66 to 67 by eight years from 2034-36 to 2026-28. The Pensions Act 2014 was estimated to reduce expenditure on state pensions by £76.5 billion over the period 2026/27 to 2035/36 inclusive (in 2013/14 price terms). Keeping female State Pension age at 66 beyond 2036 would incur further costs. For more information see: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/310746/pensions-act-ia-annex-b-state-pension-age.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
105835 more like this
105836 more like this
105837 more like this
105838 more like this
105839 more like this
105840 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:36:35.047Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:36:35.047Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4611
unstar this property label Biography information for Emma Little Pengelly more like this
765980
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading Pension Credit: East Renfrewshire more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many East Renfrewshire residents (a) are eligible to receive and (b) claim pension credit. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency East Renfrewshire more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Masterton more like this
star this property uin 105867 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-13more like thismore than 2017-10-13
star this property answer text <p>The information requested on the number of individuals eligible to receive Pension Credit by parliamentary constituency is not available at that level.</p><p> </p><p>At the end of February 2017, there were 2,021 individuals in receipt of Pension Credit in East Renfrewshire.</p><p> </p><p>This information is published and available at:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/" target="_blank">https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk</a></p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-13T12:04:24.52Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-13T12:04:24.52Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
4625
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Masterton more like this
765849
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-06more like thismore than 2017-10-06
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property hansard heading State Retirement Pensions: Females more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
unstar this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of compensating women who have reached state pension age for losses caused by changes introduced in the Pension Acts 1995 and 2011 to their state pensions. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Huddersfield more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Barry Sheerman more like this
star this property uin 106071 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-16more like thismore than 2017-10-16
star this property answer text <p>The Government will not be revisiting the State Pension age arrangements for women affected by the Pensions Act 1995 and Pensions Act 2011. These women will receive their State Pension either at the same age as men or earlier as we remove the current inequality, as set out in the 1995 &amp; 2011 Acts. A concession was made prior to the passing of the 2011 Act which reduced the delay that anyone would experience in claiming their State Pension, relative to the previous timetable, to 18 months. This concession benefited almost a quarter of a million women, who would otherwise have experienced delays of up to two years. A similar number of men also benefited from a reduced increase, and the concession was worth £1.1 billion in total.</p><p>It is worth noting that the average woman who reached SPa post 2015 gets a higher state pension income over her lifetime than an average woman reaching SPa at any point before. Also, over a lifetime, the average woman who reached State Pension age in 2015 will still receive more than the average man in spite of the rise in women’s state pension age. Any amendment to the current legislation which creates a new inequality between men and women would unquestionably be highly dubious as a matter of law.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hexham remove filter
star this property answering member printed Guy Opperman more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-16T15:50:16.233Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-16T15:50:16.233Z
star this property answering member
4142
star this property label Biography information for Guy Opperman more like this
star this property tabling member
411
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Barry Sheerman more like this