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166777
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-28more like thismore than 2014-11-28
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Police: Interpreters more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what guidance her Department issues to police forces on their obligation to provide interpreter services. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Enfield North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nick de Bois more like this
star this property uin 216365 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-04more like thismore than 2014-12-04
star this property answer text The Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 Code of Practice C (on the Detention, Treatment and Questioning of Persons by Police Officers) sets out the obligations of chief officers in respect of interpretation and translation services. Please refer to Section 13 of PACE in particular. more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-04T16:40:26.31Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-04T16:40:26.31Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
4002
unstar this property label Biography information for Nick de Bois more like this
385094
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-06-23more like thismore than 2015-06-23
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Bail more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which individual offences were committed by people granted post-conviction bail at a Crown Court who subsequently failed to appear for sentence in the violence against the person category in 2013. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 3722 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-06-30more like thismore than 2015-06-30
star this property answer text <table><tbody><tr><td colspan="3"><p>The table below shows the individual offences in the violence against the person category for which the 26 offenders who were given post-conviction bail at the Crown Court for these offences subsequently failed to appear for sentence in England &amp; Wales during 2013.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td colspan="6"><p><strong>Offenders granted post-conviction bail at the Crown Court for violence against the person offences who subsequently failed to appear for sentence, by specific offence, England &amp; Wales, 2013</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong>Offence</strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Statute</strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p>Offenders granted post-conviction bail who failed to appear for sentence<strong><sup>(1)</sup></strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Making threats to kill</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Offences against the Person Act 1861</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p>2</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Wounding etc. with intent to do grievous bodily harm etc.</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Offences against the Person Act 1861</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p>6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Wound / inflict grievous bodily harm without intent</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Offences against the Person Act 1861</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p>5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Assaults occasioning actual bodily harm</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Common Law and Offences against the Person Act 1861</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p>11</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Breach of Restraining Order</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Protection from Harassment Act 1997</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>False imprisonment</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p>Common Law</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p>1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p><strong>Total</strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td><p><strong> </strong></p></td><td colspan="2"><p><strong>26</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="6"><p>Note: Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.</p></td></tr><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.</p></td><td colspan="2"><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Ref: PQ 3722.</p></td><td><p> </p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2015-06-30T15:03:16.327Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
169880
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-12-11more like thismore than 2014-12-11
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Travel more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how much his Department has spent on (a) taxis, (b) first class train tickets and (c) business class air travel in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Manchester Central more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lucy Powell more like this
star this property uin 218480 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-18more like thismore than 2014-12-18
star this property answer text <p>a) The overall spend on taxis has reduced significantly over the past five years. Taxis can only be used if the proposed journey is not practicable by public transport. These figures include the transportation of prisoners to medical appointments and funerals. The spend comes out of each prisons budget and can vary, depending on location. Greater use of pool cars has reduced the overall spend on taxis over the past five years.</p><p> </p><p>MOJ has spent the following on taxis in the periods requested.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>£6,914,699.28</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>£6,052,236.72</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>£5,118,258.45</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>£4,207,627.93</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>£3,110,229.09</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>b) There is a ban on all first class travel. The only exception to this ban is to support the needs of some disabled staff in carrying out their duties, where it is reasonable to do so. Exceptions for rail travel cannot be made on any other grounds.</p><p> </p><p>The MOJ has spent the following on first class rail travel in the periods requested (excluding spend by MOJ in December 2010 as this data is not currently available):</p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>£1,988,205.37</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>£421,346.96</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>£352,927.96</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>£398,930.05</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>£411,327.18</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p>c) There is a ban on all first class travel, and on business class travel for flights less than eight hours duration, except in the case of flights of five hours and over where there is a business need, such as where staff are required to go straight into a meeting following a flight or where staff are required to work on a flight and a business case is approved.</p><p>The MOJ has spent the following on business class air travel for 2013 and 2014. Prior to 2013, the MoJ were contracted with a different supplier and to go through all of the individual travel records would incur disproportionate cost.</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>£78,547.75</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>£86,214.89</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-18T16:44:31.25Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-18T16:44:31.25Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
4263
unstar this property label Biography information for Lucy Powell more like this
92662
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-10more like thismore than 2014-10-10
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading 101 Calls more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the effect of the 101 non-emergency police number on the number of non-essential 999 calls. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hyndburn more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Graham Jones more like this
star this property uin 209288 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-10-15more like thismore than 2014-10-15
star this property answer text <p>Whilst we have monitored the effect of the 101 non-emergency police number on the number of 999 calls, we have not undertaken an official assessment. We are currently considering, with other government departments, options to review the impact of 101, including on 999.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-10-15T15:12:41.7176741Zmore like thismore than 2014-10-15T15:12:41.7176741Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
3999
unstar this property label Biography information for Graham P Jones more like this
179028
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-10more like thismore than 2015-02-10
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Dog Fighting more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to encourage police forces to allocate adequate resources towards reducing the incidence of dog fighting. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 223985 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-02-12more like thismore than 2015-02-12
star this property answer text <p>Whilst the government takes the issue of dog fighting seriously, the allocation of police resources to tackle this abhorrent practice is a matter for individual police forces, and we have introduced Police and Crime Commissioners to ensure that police force priorities across England and Wales better reflect those of the communities they serve.</p><p /> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-02-12T17:58:19.6Zmore like thismore than 2015-02-12T17:58:19.6Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
166787
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-28more like thismore than 2014-11-28
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Sentencing more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, How many (a) suspended sentences, (b) cautions and (c) custodial sentences were handed down in each year since 2010 for (i) burglary, (ii) sexual assault, (iii) grievous bodily harm, (iv) rape, (v) manslaughter, (vi) attempted murder, (vii) forgery, (viii) fraud, (ix) theft of a motor vehicle, (x) theft from a person, (xi) robbery, (xii) sexual activity with a child under 16, (xiii) sexual activity with a child under 13, (xiv) sexual assault of a female, (xv) rape of a male, (xvi) rape of a female, (xvii) sexual assault on a male, (xviii) child abduction, (xix) abandoning children aged under two years, (xx) cruelty or neglect of children, (xxi) wounding or other acts endangering life, (xxii) causing death by aggravated vehicle-taking, (xxiii) causing death by driving while unlicensed or uninsured, (xxiv) causing death of a child or a vulnerable person, (xxv) causing death by careless driving when under the influence of drink or drugs, (xxvi) manslaughter due to diminished responsibility, (xxvii) causing death by reckless driving, (xxviii) threat or conspiracy to murder, (xxix) perverting the course of justice, (xxx) violent disorder, (xxxi) kidnapping, (xxxii) blackmail, (xxxiii) intent to supply a controlled drug, (xxxiv) possession of a controlled drug, (xxxv) criminal damage, (xxxvi) arson, (xxxvii) common assault, (xxxviii) dangerous driving and (xxxix) firearms offences.
star this property tabling member constituency Tooting more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Sadiq Khan more like this
star this property uin 216464 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-03more like thismore than 2014-12-03
star this property answer text <p>Whilst crime is falling, since 2010 offenders are more likely to go to prison, and for longer. In 2013, of all offenders sentenced for indictable offences, 27% were sentenced to immediate custody, 23% to community sentences, 18% to a fine, and 12% to a Suspended Sentence Order. In 2013, for the first time in the period between 2003 and 2013, immediate custody was the most common disposal given for indictable offences.</p><p> </p><p>This Government is creating a tough justice system with severe penalties available for serious offenders. We have already introduced automatic life sentences for a second serious sexual or violent offence, and we are legislating to end automatic early release for child rapists, terrorists and dangerous offenders. Our radical reforms to rehabilitation will mean for the first time every offender leaving prison spends at least 12 months under supervision, where currently around 50,000 are released each year with no statutory support. This will start to address the scandalous gap that allows our most chaotic offenders to leave prison with no support or supervision to turn their lives around.</p><p> </p><p>Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for the courts, within the maximum penalty set by Parliament for the offence. Courts have discretion to suspend an adult custodial sentence and since December 2012 have been able to suspend a sentence of two years or less, where previously only a sentence of 12 months or less could be suspended.</p><p> </p><p>The Government is clear that serious offences should always be brought to court and to ensure that there is increased public confidence in the justice system announced in November last year changes to police guidance. This revised guidance states simple cautions should not be given for indictable only offences, certain serious either way offences or repeat offenders unless there are exceptional circumstances and a senior police officer, as well as the CPS for certain cases, has agreed that a caution should be administered. We have legislated in the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill to put statutory restrictions on the use of cautions for serious offences and repeat offenders.</p><p> </p><p>The number of people cautioned and offenders sentences at all courts for the requested offences, in England and Wales, in each year from 2010 to 2013 (latest data available) are published on the Ministry of Justice website and can be viewed at the following link:-</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-statistics-quarterly-december-2013" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-statistics-quarterly-december-2013</a></p><p> </p><p>From the above link select “Outcome by offence” noting that: grievous bodily harm offences can be viewed under assault with intent to cause serious harm; causing death by reckless driving can be viewed under causing death by dangerous driving; and wounding or other acts endangering life can be viewed under other acts endangering life.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-03T17:42:23.23Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-03T17:42:23.23Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
1577
unstar this property label Biography information for Sadiq Khan more like this
155542
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-11more like thismore than 2014-11-11
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Sentencing more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders being sentenced to a custodial sentence for a second or subsequent offence were given a concurrent custodial sentence in each of the last four years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 214193 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-21more like thismore than 2014-11-21
star this property answer text <p>Whilst crime is falling, sentences are getting more severe. Under this Government fewer individuals are entering the criminal justice system for the first time but those who do offend are more likely to go to prison, and for longer.</p><p> </p><p>The court has discretion as to how sentences should be served. The independent Sentencing Council issued a guideline, <em>Offences Taken Into Consideration and Totality</em>, which all courts must follow so that there is a consistency of approach. The guideline says that there is no inflexible rule governing whether sentences should be structured as concurrent or consecutive components but the overriding principle is that the overall sentence must be just and proportionate.</p><p> </p><p>The general approach on whether sentences should be served consecutively or concurrently as it applies to determinate custodial sentences, is that concurrent sentences will ordinarily be appropriate where the offences arise out of the same incident, or where there is a series of offences of the same or similar kind. Consecutive sentences will normally be appropriate where the offences arise out of unrelated facts or incidents, the offences are of a similar kind but the overall criminality will not be sufficiently reflected by concurrent sentences, or where one or more offences qualifies for a minimum sentence and concurrent sentences would improperly undermine that minimum. The guideline deals in more detail with various circumstances including where the offender is serving an existing custodial sentence and is being sentenced to custody for another offence.</p><p> </p><p>The information requested is complex and needs to be extracted from raw data, formatted and checked. This will take some time and I will therefore write to my honourable Friend as soon as it is available.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN 214192 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-21T14:44:51.097Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-21T14:44:51.097Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
156061
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-17more like thismore than 2014-11-17
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Parole more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will bring forward proposals to restrict the right of prisoners to be eligible for parole on multiple occasions. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 214734 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-24more like thismore than 2014-11-24
star this property answer text <p>Whilst crime is falling, sentences are getting more severe. Under this Government fewer individuals are entering the criminal justice system for the first time but those who do offend are more likely to go to prison, and for longer.</p><p> </p><p>Prisoners serving life sentences, imprisonment for public protection, certain extended determinate sentences and some historical long determinate sentences of four years or more for a serious sexual or violent crime committed prior to 5 April 2005, and also certain offenders who have been recalled for breach of their licence conditions, are subject to discretionary release by the Parole Board. A prisoner serving a life sentence or a sentence of imprisonment for public protection must serve their minimum term in full before being eligible for consideration for release. A prisoner serving an extended determinate sentence of 10 years or more must serve at least two-thirds of their custodial term before being considered for release, and a prisoner serving an historical long determinate sentence must serve at least half of their custodial term before being eligible to come before the Parole Board.</p><p> </p><p>All prisoners are subject to the same release test and they are only released (prior to any automatic release provisions which may apply in the case of determinate sentence prisoners) if the Parole Board is satisfied that it is safe to do so. Where an offender is turned down for parole his or her case is normally considered again after a period of two years in indeterminate sentence cases and one year for those serving determinate sentences.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Where an offender is released on licence but then commits a further offence and is recalled to prison, unless the prisoner is subject to a fixed term recall, he or she may serve the rest of their sentence in custody unless the Parole Board considers it safe to re-release the prisoner. Fixed term recalls are not available for offenders serving indeterminate or extended sentences. The sentence imposed for the further offence may also affect when the offender next becomes eligible to be considered for release. The seriousness of the further offence committed, the offender’s general behaviour on licence and their level of risk will, of course, be important factors which the Parole Board will take into account when considering re-release. Where a recalled offender is serving an indeterminate sentence it is possible that they will remain in prison for the rest of their life, and other offenders serving determinate sentences may remain in prison until the end of their custodial term, but it is important to review their progress regularly to determine whether or not the offender’s continued detention is necessary to protect the public.</p><p> </p><p>The Government has no current plans to change the above arrangements.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN 214490 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-24T17:31:52.5Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-24T17:31:52.5Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
106455
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-04more like thismore than 2014-11-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Drugs: Misuse more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 30 October 2014, to Question 212152, how many people convicted of possession of (a) class A, (b) class B and (c) class C drugs under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 were (i) cautioned, (ii) given a custodial sentence, (iii) fined, (iv) given a community resolution and (v) given some other form of discharge in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kingston upon Hull North more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Diana Johnson more like this
star this property uin 213455 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-07more like thismore than 2014-11-07
star this property answer text <p>Whilst crime is falling, sentences are getting more severe. Since 2010, offenders are more likely to go to prison, and for longer.</p><p> </p><p>We believe that court will always be the right place for serious and contested cases, as well as persistent offenders. There is a range of sentences available to independent judges to impose on offenders found guilty of a crime. We are clear that prison will always be the right place for serious offenders. In addition, financial penalties play a vital role within the sentencing framework, however they must have real bite and must be enforced.</p><p> </p><p>The Government is already legislating to restrict the use of cautions and has recently outlined proposals to go further and replace cautions in England and Wales, with a system of suspended prosecutions. The aim is to ensure that there are more direct consequences in future for committing even minor crimes. This new approach will empower victims and give them a say in how criminals are dealt with, as well as making it easier for officers to deal with more minor offences.</p><p> </p><p>Details of the numbers of cautions issued by the police and the number of defendants found guilty and sentenced at all courts, with outcomes, for possession of class A, class B and class C drugs, in England and Wales, from 2009 to 2013 (latest available) can be viewed on the Ministry of Justice website at the available link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/311455/cjs-outcomes-by-offence-2009-2013.xls" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/311455/cjs-outcomes-by-offence-2009-2013.xls</a></p><p> </p><p>Under Offence drop down list select:</p><p> </p><p>1) Possession of a controlled drug class A</p><p>2) Possession of a controlled drug class B</p><p>3) Possession of a controlled drug class C</p>
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-07T14:31:38.4978153Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-07T14:31:38.4978153Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property tabling member
1533
unstar this property label Biography information for Diana Johnson more like this
168076
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-12-04more like thismore than 2014-12-04
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Crime more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) adults and (b) juveniles in each local criminal justice board area were convicted of (i) violence against the person, (ii) sexual offences, (iii) robbery, (iv) burglary and (v) theft in each year between 2010 and 2014. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hammersmith more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Andy Slaughter more like this
star this property uin 217273 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-09more like thismore than 2014-12-09
star this property answer text <p>Whilst crime is falling, more offenders are going to prison and for longer. In 2013, for the first time in the past decade, immediate custody was the most common disposal given for indictable offences. It is also important to note that more sexual offences have been dealt with this year as more victims come forward for historical crimes and because of generally increased reporting.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>The number of offenders found guilty at all courts, by age group, offence type and Police force area, in England and Wales from 2010 to 2013 (the latest data available) can be viewed in the table.</p><p><strong> </strong></p><p>Data by police force has been provided as we are not able to group results from the Crown Court by local criminal justice board.</p><p> </p><p>Court proceeding data for calendar year 2014 is planned for publication in May 2015.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Hemel Hempstead more like this
star this property answering member printed Mike Penning remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-09T17:35:41.73Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-09T17:35:41.73Z
star this property answering member
1528
unstar this property label Biography information for Sir Mike Penning more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name 217273 - Table.xlsx more like this
star this property title Offenders found guilty at all courts 2010-2013 more like this
star this property tabling member
1516
unstar this property label Biography information for Andy Slaughter more like this