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1137740
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-09more like thismore than 2019-07-09
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Diesel Fuel: Excise Duties more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 8 July 2019 to Question 272300, what the diesel duty revenues were from (a) shipping, (b) agriculture, (c) road users, (d) rail and (e) any other sectoral information held by his Department in each of the last 10 years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 275232 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-07-17more like thismore than 2019-07-17
star this property answer text Duty is collected when fuel leaves a refinery or import terminal, so HMRC data does not break down diesel duty revenues by sectors where fuel is used. HMRC publishes information on historic fuel duty receipts on Page 5 of the <a href="https://www.uktradeinfo.com/Statistics/Tax%20and%20Duty%20Bulletins/Oils0519.xls" target="_blank">Hydrocarbon Oils Bulletin</a>. This shows receipts for diesel taxed at the full rate of duty for road use and also for rebated ‘gas oil’. This refers to marked diesel which is taxed at a reduced rate of duty because it is intended for off road use in sectors such as agriculture and construction, as well as for maritime and rail transport. more like this
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-17T12:39:22.317Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-17T12:39:22.317Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1136665
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-03more like thismore than 2019-07-03
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Social Mobility: EU Countries more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Exchequer Secretary to the Treasury of 2 July 2019, Official Report Vol 662, Column 1054, which countries in Europe his Department considers to have higher levels of social inequality than the UK, and what criteria his Department used to make that assessment. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 272889 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-07-12more like thismore than 2019-07-12
star this property answer text <p>The most common measure of inequality is income, and there are a number of countries in Europe that had a higher level of income inequality than the UK in 2017, including Spain, Portugal and Greece. Income inequality by this metric is lower today than it was in 2010.</p><p> </p><p>Such measures of inequality do not capture the benefit households receive from the Government’s significant and progressive spending on public services. In 2019/20, the lowest income households will receive over £4 in public spending for every £1 they pay in tax on average. While the highest income households will contribute over £5 in tax for every £1 they receive in public spending on average.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-12T10:01:06.957Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-12T10:01:06.957Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1136385
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-02more like thismore than 2019-07-02
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Fuels: Excise Duties more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the tax duty revenue was from (a) aviation gasoline, (b) aviation turbine fuel, (c) unleaded petrol and (d) diesel in each year since 2010. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 272300 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-07-08more like thismore than 2019-07-08
star this property answer text <p>Total tax receipts from aviation gasoline, aviation turbine fuel, unleaded petrol and diesel are shown in the table below:</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p><strong>Year</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Aviation gasoline (£m)</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Aviation turbine fuel (£m)</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Unleaded petrol (£m)</strong></p></td><td><p><strong>Diesel (£m)</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>9.3</p></td><td><p>0.1</p></td><td><p>11,465</p></td><td><p>14,826</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>9.4</p></td><td><p>0.1</p></td><td><p>10,862</p></td><td><p>14,944</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>7.6</p></td><td><p>0.1</p></td><td><p>10,247</p></td><td><p>15,247</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>7.7</p></td><td><p>0.1</p></td><td><p>9,959</p></td><td><p>15,822</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>7.8</p></td><td><p>0.2</p></td><td><p>9,706</p></td><td><p>16,341</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015/16</p></td><td><p>7.7</p></td><td><p>0.2</p></td><td><p>9,562</p></td><td><p>16,965</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016/17</p></td><td><p>8.0</p></td><td><p>0.2</p></td><td><p>9,420</p></td><td><p>17,448</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2017/18</p></td><td><p>7.8</p></td><td><p>0.2</p></td><td><p>9,192</p></td><td><p>17,621</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2018/19 (provisional)</p></td><td><p>7.8</p></td><td><p>0.2</p></td><td><p>9,280</p></td><td><p>17,657</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-08T10:27:37.157Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-08T10:27:37.157Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1121835
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-18more like thismore than 2019-04-18
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Housing: Insulation more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department plans to take to help support the National Infrastructure Commission’s recommendation of increasing the rate of insulation measures installed in UK homes to 21,000 a week by 2020; and if he will make a statement. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 245863 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-04-30more like thismore than 2019-04-30
star this property answer text <p>The National Infrastructure Commission made over 50 recommendations to the government, in their National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA) published in July 2018. As announced at Budget 2018, the government will respond in full to the NIA through a National Infrastructure Strategy, including on the installation rate of energy efficiency measures in the building stock.</p><p> </p><p>The government has already set out an ambitious aspiration on energy efficiency in the Clean Growth Strategy, for as many homes as possible to reach EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable; and the Prime Minister has announced an Industrial Strategy mission to at least halve the energy use of new buildings by 2030. The government has a growing programme of ambitious policies to drive forward progress towards this aspiration, including extending the Energy Company Obligation from 2022 to 2028 to support more than £3bn of investment to upgrade the energy efficiency of around a million more homes, tightening the regulations on minimum energy efficiency standards in private rented homes, and announcing the introduction of a Future Homes Standard to ensure that all new homes are built with world-leading levels of energy efficiency and low-carbon heating. The government is further considering the detail of these policies, in order to unlock the necessary energy efficiency improvements for homes and businesses during the 2020s.</p><p> </p><p>At Spring Statement, the Chancellor confirmed that the National Infrastructure Strategy will be published later in 2019, alongside the Spending Review and Autumn Budget. The Spending Review will determine the government’s spending priorities going forward, assessing spending in the round against government priorities and a broad evidence base. As part of that evidence base, HM Treasury guidance in the Green Book sets out the methodology by which Departments should undertake cost-benefit analysis for all proposals that concern public spending and changes to regulations, including for energy efficiency and broader infrastructure requirements. These are scrutinised by Treasury spending teams to support decision making and ensure value for money. Impact Assessments associated with particular policy proposals are published online at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
245864 more like this
245877 more like this
245884 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.18Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.18Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1121836
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-18more like thismore than 2019-04-18
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Housing: Insulation more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the amount of public funding required to achieve the National Infrastructure Commission’s recommendation of increasing the rate of insulation measures installed in UK homes to 21,000 a week by 2020. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 245864 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-04-30more like thismore than 2019-04-30
star this property answer text <p>The National Infrastructure Commission made over 50 recommendations to the government, in their National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA) published in July 2018. As announced at Budget 2018, the government will respond in full to the NIA through a National Infrastructure Strategy, including on the installation rate of energy efficiency measures in the building stock.</p><p> </p><p>The government has already set out an ambitious aspiration on energy efficiency in the Clean Growth Strategy, for as many homes as possible to reach EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable; and the Prime Minister has announced an Industrial Strategy mission to at least halve the energy use of new buildings by 2030. The government has a growing programme of ambitious policies to drive forward progress towards this aspiration, including extending the Energy Company Obligation from 2022 to 2028 to support more than £3bn of investment to upgrade the energy efficiency of around a million more homes, tightening the regulations on minimum energy efficiency standards in private rented homes, and announcing the introduction of a Future Homes Standard to ensure that all new homes are built with world-leading levels of energy efficiency and low-carbon heating. The government is further considering the detail of these policies, in order to unlock the necessary energy efficiency improvements for homes and businesses during the 2020s.</p><p> </p><p>At Spring Statement, the Chancellor confirmed that the National Infrastructure Strategy will be published later in 2019, alongside the Spending Review and Autumn Budget. The Spending Review will determine the government’s spending priorities going forward, assessing spending in the round against government priorities and a broad evidence base. As part of that evidence base, HM Treasury guidance in the Green Book sets out the methodology by which Departments should undertake cost-benefit analysis for all proposals that concern public spending and changes to regulations, including for energy efficiency and broader infrastructure requirements. These are scrutinised by Treasury spending teams to support decision making and ensure value for money. Impact Assessments associated with particular policy proposals are published online at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
245863 more like this
245877 more like this
245884 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.24Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.24Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1121854
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-18more like thismore than 2019-04-18
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Infrastructure more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what cost-benefit analysis his Department has made of the economic effect of (a) energy efficiency measures in homes and (b) other infrastructure projects. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 245877 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-04-30more like thismore than 2019-04-30
star this property answer text <p>The National Infrastructure Commission made over 50 recommendations to the government, in their National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA) published in July 2018. As announced at Budget 2018, the government will respond in full to the NIA through a National Infrastructure Strategy, including on the installation rate of energy efficiency measures in the building stock.</p><p> </p><p>The government has already set out an ambitious aspiration on energy efficiency in the Clean Growth Strategy, for as many homes as possible to reach EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable; and the Prime Minister has announced an Industrial Strategy mission to at least halve the energy use of new buildings by 2030. The government has a growing programme of ambitious policies to drive forward progress towards this aspiration, including extending the Energy Company Obligation from 2022 to 2028 to support more than £3bn of investment to upgrade the energy efficiency of around a million more homes, tightening the regulations on minimum energy efficiency standards in private rented homes, and announcing the introduction of a Future Homes Standard to ensure that all new homes are built with world-leading levels of energy efficiency and low-carbon heating. The government is further considering the detail of these policies, in order to unlock the necessary energy efficiency improvements for homes and businesses during the 2020s.</p><p> </p><p>At Spring Statement, the Chancellor confirmed that the National Infrastructure Strategy will be published later in 2019, alongside the Spending Review and Autumn Budget. The Spending Review will determine the government’s spending priorities going forward, assessing spending in the round against government priorities and a broad evidence base. As part of that evidence base, HM Treasury guidance in the Green Book sets out the methodology by which Departments should undertake cost-benefit analysis for all proposals that concern public spending and changes to regulations, including for energy efficiency and broader infrastructure requirements. These are scrutinised by Treasury spending teams to support decision making and ensure value for money. Impact Assessments associated with particular policy proposals are published online at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
245863 more like this
245864 more like this
245884 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.273Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.273Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
1121863
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-18more like thismore than 2019-04-18
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Energy: Conservation more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has plans to classify energy efficiency as a priority cross-Department matter in the forthcoming Spending Review. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 245884 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-04-30more like thismore than 2019-04-30
star this property answer text <p>The National Infrastructure Commission made over 50 recommendations to the government, in their National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA) published in July 2018. As announced at Budget 2018, the government will respond in full to the NIA through a National Infrastructure Strategy, including on the installation rate of energy efficiency measures in the building stock.</p><p> </p><p>The government has already set out an ambitious aspiration on energy efficiency in the Clean Growth Strategy, for as many homes as possible to reach EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable; and the Prime Minister has announced an Industrial Strategy mission to at least halve the energy use of new buildings by 2030. The government has a growing programme of ambitious policies to drive forward progress towards this aspiration, including extending the Energy Company Obligation from 2022 to 2028 to support more than £3bn of investment to upgrade the energy efficiency of around a million more homes, tightening the regulations on minimum energy efficiency standards in private rented homes, and announcing the introduction of a Future Homes Standard to ensure that all new homes are built with world-leading levels of energy efficiency and low-carbon heating. The government is further considering the detail of these policies, in order to unlock the necessary energy efficiency improvements for homes and businesses during the 2020s.</p><p> </p><p>At Spring Statement, the Chancellor confirmed that the National Infrastructure Strategy will be published later in 2019, alongside the Spending Review and Autumn Budget. The Spending Review will determine the government’s spending priorities going forward, assessing spending in the round against government priorities and a broad evidence base. As part of that evidence base, HM Treasury guidance in the Green Book sets out the methodology by which Departments should undertake cost-benefit analysis for all proposals that concern public spending and changes to regulations, including for energy efficiency and broader infrastructure requirements. These are scrutinised by Treasury spending teams to support decision making and ensure value for money. Impact Assessments associated with particular policy proposals are published online at: <a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications</a>.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
245863 more like this
245864 more like this
245877 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.32Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-30T07:56:35.32Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
973251
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-09-13more like thismore than 2018-09-13
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Infrastructure more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the July 2018 report of the National Infrastructure Commission’s entitled National Infrastructure Assessment. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 174781 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2018-10-15more like thismore than 2018-10-15
star this property answer text <p>The government welcomed the publication of the National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA), and is considering the recommendations.</p><p> </p><p>As set out in the National Infrastructure Commission’s Framework Document, the government will respond to the NIC’s recommendations as soon as practicable, and endeavour to respond within 6 months, and no longer than a year.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-10-15T15:00:09.877Zmore like thismore than 2018-10-15T15:00:09.877Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
934169
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-07-05more like thismore than 2018-07-05
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Fossil Fuels: Expenditure more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much the Government spent from the public purse on (a) subsidies, (b) investment and (c) research and development in the fossil fuel energy sectors in each of the last 10 financial years and to date in the 2018 - 2019 financial year. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 160319 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2018-07-11more like thismore than 2018-07-11
star this property answer text <p>The UK currently has no fossil fuel subsidies. We are committed to meeting our climate change commitments as cost effectively as possible and over the last 10 years emissions from the power sector have decreased by 57%. Looking ahead we have committed to further reducing our dependence on fossil fuels by phasing out unabated coal from our power system altogether by 2025. The Government is also enabling the transition away from fossil fuels in the transport sector by supporting the development of the market for ultra-low emission vehicles.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-07-11T14:45:42.027Zmore like thismore than 2018-07-11T14:45:42.027Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
900225
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-05-08more like thismore than 2018-05-08
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Landfill Tax more like this
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
unstar this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to consult on increasing the rate of landfill tax beyond 2020. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun remove filter
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 141846 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2018-05-11more like thismore than 2018-05-11
star this property answer text <p>The government announces the rates of Landfill Tax at least 2 years in advance to provide longer term certainty on rates. Autumn Budget 2017 outlined RPI increases in the rates of Landfill Tax for 2019-20.</p><p> </p><p>Budget 2018 will announce the rates of Landfill Tax for the year 2020-21. Whether the rates for further years are announced alongside this will be decided as part of the Budget process, as will any potential changes in the rates. Assessments of the impacts of potential changes to the rates will be considered as part of the Budget process.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Newark remove filter
star this property answering member printed Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
141847 more like this
141848 more like this
141849 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-05-11T10:13:23.933Zmore like thismore than 2018-05-11T10:13:23.933Z
star this property answering member
4320
unstar this property label Biography information for Robert Jenrick more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this