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star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-11more like thismore than 2019-04-11
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Universal Credit remove filter
unstar this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate his Department has made of the distributional effect of a further £1,000 increase to the same work allowances which were increased in Budget 2018 on the percentage increase in the incomes of each decile. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Harborough more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Neil O'Brien more like this
star this property uin 244185 remove filter
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-04-29more like thismore than 2019-04-29
unstar this property answer text <p>The £1,000 increase to the Universal Credit (UC) work allowance, announced in Budget 2018, will increase the amount that 2.4 million households can earn before their UC begins to be withdrawn. This change will enable working parents and people with disabilities on Universal Credit to keep over £630 extra income each year. The Budget 2018 work allowance change increased government support for UC by £1.7bn per year by 2023-24. No assessment has been made of the cost of a further £1,000 increase in the work allowances over and above those which were increased in Budget 2018.</p><p> </p><p>HM Treasury’s distributional analysis, published alongside Budget 2018, shows the cumulative effect on household incomes of policies on welfare, tax, and public service spending measures. Because different measures often interact with each other, this cumulative assessment provides the best representation of the overall intended policy effect. This shows that since this Chancellor and Prime Minister took office, their decisions have benefited households throughout the income distribution, with the poorest households gaining the most as a percentage of net income.</p>
star this property answering member constituency South West Norfolk more like this
star this property answering member printed Elizabeth Truss more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
244182 more like this
244183 more like this
244184 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-29T12:48:56.013Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-29T12:48:56.013Z
star this property answering member
4097
star this property label Biography information for Elizabeth Truss more like this
star this property tabling member
4679
unstar this property label Biography information for Neil O'Brien more like this