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1131249
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-11more like thismore than 2019-06-11
star this property answering body
Church Commissioners more like this
star this property answering dept id 9 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Church Commissioners more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Church Commissioners more like this
star this property hansard heading Churches: Coal more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what assessment she made of the economic effect on churches and vicarages of the ban on house coal. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Shipley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Philip Davies more like this
star this property uin 263116 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>The economic effect on churches and vicarages of the ban on the use of house coal has been negligible.</p><p> </p><p>Bishops’ see houses and vicarages have not used house coal for many years and the Church Commissioners are not aware of any churches that still use coal as a form of heating.</p><p>The Church of England supports the aim of the Government to improve air quality and public health; the Church has launched several initiatives to support this policy, which include planting more trees on its properties and encouraging churches to increase the biodiversity of their churchyards and green spaces.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Meriden more like this
star this property answering member printed Dame Caroline Spelman more like this
star this property question first answered
remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:54:40.053Z
unstar this property answering member
312
star this property label Biography information for Dame Caroline Spelman more like this
star this property tabling member
1565
unstar this property label Biography information for Philip Davies more like this
1130880
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Occupational Pensions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that (a) investment choices available to workplace pension customers are regularly reviewed by Independent Governance Committees and (b) those investment choices are aligned with the interests of customers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wallasey more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ms Angela Eagle more like this
star this property uin 262255 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) introduced rules in 2015 to require contract-based pension providers to set up independent governance committees (IGCs) to address poor consumer outcomes.</p><p>IGCs have a duty to scrutinise the value for money of the provider’s workplace personal pension schemes, taking into account transaction costs, raising concerns and making recommendations to the provider’s board as appropriate. IGCs have a duty to assess whether all the investment choices available, including default options, are suitable for the interests of consumers.</p><p>In 2016, the FCA reviewed IGCs and found that they were “generally effective” in influencing and advancing cost reductions for members. The review also found that the Independent Project Board’s work in auditing high legacy charges and implementing IGCs had been successful. As a result, a substantial majority of consumers received improved outcomes regarding costs and charges, with 1m consumers receiving reduced costs and charges.</p><p>The FCA has announced that it will undertake a further review of IGCs in 2019/20.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
262256 more like this
262257 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:34:39.917Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
491
unstar this property label Biography information for Ms Angela Eagle more like this
1130881
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Occupational Pensions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make it his policy that Independent Governance Committees attached to contract-based workplace pensions have a duty to monitor the suitability of the retail fund choices available to scheme members. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wallasey more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ms Angela Eagle more like this
star this property uin 262256 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) introduced rules in 2015 to require contract-based pension providers to set up independent governance committees (IGCs) to address poor consumer outcomes.</p><p>IGCs have a duty to scrutinise the value for money of the provider’s workplace personal pension schemes, taking into account transaction costs, raising concerns and making recommendations to the provider’s board as appropriate. IGCs have a duty to assess whether all the investment choices available, including default options, are suitable for the interests of consumers.</p><p>In 2016, the FCA reviewed IGCs and found that they were “generally effective” in influencing and advancing cost reductions for members. The review also found that the Independent Project Board’s work in auditing high legacy charges and implementing IGCs had been successful. As a result, a substantial majority of consumers received improved outcomes regarding costs and charges, with 1m consumers receiving reduced costs and charges.</p><p>The FCA has announced that it will undertake a further review of IGCs in 2019/20.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
262255 more like this
262257 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:34:39.963Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:34:39.963Z
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
491
unstar this property label Biography information for Ms Angela Eagle more like this
1130882
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-10more like thismore than 2019-06-10
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Occupational Pensions more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the adequacy of scrutiny by Independent Governance Committees of the retail funds offered within workplace pensions products. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wallasey more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ms Angela Eagle more like this
star this property uin 262257 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) introduced rules in 2015 to require contract-based pension providers to set up independent governance committees (IGCs) to address poor consumer outcomes.</p><p>IGCs have a duty to scrutinise the value for money of the provider’s workplace personal pension schemes, taking into account transaction costs, raising concerns and making recommendations to the provider’s board as appropriate. IGCs have a duty to assess whether all the investment choices available, including default options, are suitable for the interests of consumers.</p><p>In 2016, the FCA reviewed IGCs and found that they were “generally effective” in influencing and advancing cost reductions for members. The review also found that the Independent Project Board’s work in auditing high legacy charges and implementing IGCs had been successful. As a result, a substantial majority of consumers received improved outcomes regarding costs and charges, with 1m consumers receiving reduced costs and charges.</p><p>The FCA has announced that it will undertake a further review of IGCs in 2019/20.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
262255 more like this
262256 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:34:40.01Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:34:40.01Z
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
491
unstar this property label Biography information for Ms Angela Eagle more like this
1130351
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-06more like thismore than 2019-06-06
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Children in Care: Housing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his policy is on (a) inspection and (b) regulation of semi-independent accommodation for looked-after 16 and 17 year-olds. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ashton-under-Lyne more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Angela Rayner more like this
star this property uin 261235 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>Ofsted is responsible for regulating and inspecting settings that provide both care and accommodation, such as children’s homes (including secure children’s homes) and fostering services, in which the majority of children in care are accommodated.</p><p> </p><p>Where it is judged to be in the child’s best interests, local authorities are also permitted to accommodate children in care and care leavers aged 16 or 17 in ‘other accommodation’. This includes a range of settings such as semi-independent units, supported accommodation, hostels, foyers and supported lodgings. These settings provide accommodation with either on-site or floating support. ‘Other accommodation’ settings can provide a useful stepping-stone for young people who are increasingly able to make decisions for themselves but are not fully ready for the challenges of maintaining an independent tenancy. As these settings provide support, rather than care, Ofsted does not regulate them.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person in unregulated provision, it must ensure that the accommodation is ‘suitable’. Suitable accommodation is defined in regulations, which state that, with regard to settings used to accommodate children in care the responsible authority should ensure that:</p><ul><li>the accommodation is suitable for the child in light of their needs, including their health needs;</li><li>it has satisfied itself as to the character and suitability of the landlord or other provider;</li><li>the accommodation complies with health and safety requirements relating to rented accommodation; and</li><li>it has taken into account the child’s wishes, feelings and education, training or employment needs in respect of the responsible authority, so far as reasonably practicable.</li></ul><p> </p><p> </p><p>Further advice on suitable accommodation is provided in the Children Act Volume 2 statutory guidance, a copy of which is available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf</a>.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person out of area in unregulated provision there are additional safeguards in place. These require the placing authority to inform the host authority of their intention to place a young person with a provider in the host authority’s area, before confirming the placement. This provides an opportunity to check whether the host authority is aware of any concerns about the setting. This requirement is designed to ensure that poor quality providers are identified and exporting local authorities stop placing children in them.</p><p> </p><p>It is a long-standing principle that the local authority that took the child into care is responsible for supporting them, whether they are placed in that authority or outside the area. This enables the local authority to take into account the full range of needs of the young person and to ensure that if meets all of those needs. Moving to a system of shared accountability could create confusion about who is responsible for providing which services and runs the risk that young people placed out of area are not properly supported by either local authority.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 261236 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.307Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.307Z
unstar this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property tabling member
4356
unstar this property label Biography information for Angela Rayner more like this
1130352
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-06more like thismore than 2019-06-06
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Children in Care: Location more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of ensuring that the receiving authority has shared responsibility with the home authority for looked after children and young people who are placed out of area. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Ashton-under-Lyne more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Angela Rayner more like this
star this property uin 261236 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>Ofsted is responsible for regulating and inspecting settings that provide both care and accommodation, such as children’s homes (including secure children’s homes) and fostering services, in which the majority of children in care are accommodated.</p><p> </p><p>Where it is judged to be in the child’s best interests, local authorities are also permitted to accommodate children in care and care leavers aged 16 or 17 in ‘other accommodation’. This includes a range of settings such as semi-independent units, supported accommodation, hostels, foyers and supported lodgings. These settings provide accommodation with either on-site or floating support. ‘Other accommodation’ settings can provide a useful stepping-stone for young people who are increasingly able to make decisions for themselves but are not fully ready for the challenges of maintaining an independent tenancy. As these settings provide support, rather than care, Ofsted does not regulate them.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person in unregulated provision, it must ensure that the accommodation is ‘suitable’. Suitable accommodation is defined in regulations, which state that, with regard to settings used to accommodate children in care the responsible authority should ensure that:</p><ul><li>the accommodation is suitable for the child in light of their needs, including their health needs;</li><li>it has satisfied itself as to the character and suitability of the landlord or other provider;</li><li>the accommodation complies with health and safety requirements relating to rented accommodation; and</li><li>it has taken into account the child’s wishes, feelings and education, training or employment needs in respect of the responsible authority, so far as reasonably practicable.</li></ul><p> </p><p> </p><p>Further advice on suitable accommodation is provided in the Children Act Volume 2 statutory guidance, a copy of which is available at the following link: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/441643/Children_Act_Guidance_2015.pdf</a>.</p><p> </p><p>Where a local authority places a young person out of area in unregulated provision there are additional safeguards in place. These require the placing authority to inform the host authority of their intention to place a young person with a provider in the host authority’s area, before confirming the placement. This provides an opportunity to check whether the host authority is aware of any concerns about the setting. This requirement is designed to ensure that poor quality providers are identified and exporting local authorities stop placing children in them.</p><p> </p><p>It is a long-standing principle that the local authority that took the child into care is responsible for supporting them, whether they are placed in that authority or outside the area. This enables the local authority to take into account the full range of needs of the young person and to ensure that if meets all of those needs. Moving to a system of shared accountability could create confusion about who is responsible for providing which services and runs the risk that young people placed out of area are not properly supported by either local authority.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Stratford-on-Avon more like this
star this property answering member printed Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 261235 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.353Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:51:27.353Z
unstar this property answering member
4113
star this property label Biography information for Nadhim Zahawi more like this
star this property tabling member
4356
unstar this property label Biography information for Angela Rayner more like this
1130449
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-06more like thismore than 2019-06-06
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Bank Services: Standards more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what key performance indicators his Department uses to assess the performance of Open Banking; and what recent assessment he has made of the performance of Open Banking. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Windsor more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Adam Afriyie more like this
star this property uin 261179 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>The independent Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE) is responsible for assessing the performance of Open Banking, and HM Treasury’s view is informed by their assessment.</p><p> </p><p>The OBIE’s latest published assessment of Open Banking performance, made in March 2019, shows that in that month the average availability of Open Banking APIs was 97%, the average response time was 798 milliseconds, and that 38.2 million successful API calls had been made, representing over 97% of the total number of calls made to APIs.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:36:10.54Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:36:10.54Z
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
1586
unstar this property label Biography information for Adam Afriyie more like this
1130450
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-06more like thismore than 2019-06-06
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Cryptocurrencies more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of cryptocurrencies as a means of payment. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Windsor more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Adam Afriyie more like this
star this property uin 261180 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text The Government established the Cryptoassets Taskforce – comprised of HM Treasury, the Financial Conduct Authority and the Bank of England – in 2018 to explore the risks and potential benefits of cryptoassets and the underlying distributed ledger technology (DLT). The Taskforce’s final report<sup><sup>[1]</sup></sup> concluded that benefits associated with the use of cryptoassets may arise in the future, but that the most immediate priorities for the authorities are to mitigate the risks posed by cryptoassets to consumers and markets, and to prevent the use of cryptoassets for illicit activity. As part of this, the Government will consult on its approach to cryptoassets this year. In addition, the authorities continue to encourage the responsible development of legitimate DLT and cryptoasset-related activity in the UK.<p> </p><p>[1] Full version of the report is available at: <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/752070/cryptoassets_taskforce_final_report_final_web.pdf" target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/752070/cryptoassets_taskforce_final_report_final_web.pdf</a></p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:40:32.78Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:40:32.78Z
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
1586
unstar this property label Biography information for Adam Afriyie more like this
1130467
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-06more like thismore than 2019-06-06
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Bank Services more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that people without internet access can continue to receive paper bills and statements from their banks. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Hornsey and Wood Green more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Catherine West more like this
star this property uin 261294 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>The Government takes the firm view that consumers must be able to easily access clear and transparent information about their accounts with banks and other financial service companies.</p><p> </p><p>UK banks’ and building societies’ treatment of their customers is governed by the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) in its Principles for Businesses. This includes a general requirement for firms to provide a prompt, efficient and fair service to all of their customers. The FCA’s Handbook requires firms to identify particularly vulnerable customers, and to deal with such customers appropriately. This includes older people, the disabled, and those who do not have access to the internet. If a customer does not have access to the internet, then the FCA would expect the customer’s bank to provide or make available paper statements to them instead.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Under changes to the Payment Services Regulations (PSRs) which came into force 13 January 2018 and govern the rules around payment accounts, banks are required to provide their customers with certain information, including a monthly statement (so long as there has been a transaction on the account). However, a customer’s terms and conditions must also include a condition that they can require their monthly statement to simply be ‘made available’ on a durable medium, for example through a secure website, rather than in the form of a physical statement.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:44:28.08Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:44:28.08Z
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
4523
unstar this property label Biography information for Catherine West more like this
1130468
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-06more like thismore than 2019-06-06
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Personation: Credit Rating more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to help ensure the credit ratings of victims of identity fraud are protected. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Romford more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Andrew Rosindell more like this
star this property uin 261141 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-13more like thismore than 2019-06-13
star this property answer text <p>In 2014, the Government transferred regulatory responsibility for consumer credit from the Office of Fair Trading to the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), including regulatory responsibility for Credit Reference agencies (CRAs). CRAs are a key part of the credit market and enable lenders to assess whether an individual has the ability to repay any credit that is offered.</p><p>CRAs can advise consumers to add a Notice of correction (of up to 200 words) to their credit report explaining any special circumstances. The content of the Notice should be taken into account alongside the information on the consumer’s report.</p><p>Furthermore, the Credit Industry Fraud Avoidance System (CIFAS) is an independent fraud prevention service which has developed a system used by the credit industry and other organisations to prevent fraud. If a lender believes it may have detected a fraud or attempted fraud, a CIFAS marker may be put on an individual’s credit reference file. No one should be refused credit just because of a CIFAS marker, and these markers are not included in a credit score. It is intended to warn lenders and to protect innocent consumers.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Salisbury more like this
star this property answering member printed John Glen more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-13T13:48:56.527Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-13T13:48:56.527Z
unstar this property answering member
4051
star this property label Biography information for John Glen more like this
star this property tabling member
1447
unstar this property label Biography information for Andrew Rosindell more like this