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528034
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-06-20more like thismore than 2016-06-20
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Animal Products: Imports remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if the Government will bring forward legislative proposals to ban the bringing into the UK of hunting trophies from threatened or endangered species. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Hall Green more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Roger Godsiff more like this
star this property uin 40996 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-06-28more like thismore than 2016-06-28
star this property answer text <p>Under international rules set by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), a hunting trophy from an endangered or threatened species can be exported only if the exporting country is satisfied that the hunt was both legal and sustainable.</p><p> </p><p>Importing controls are implemented at an EU-wide level and the UK works with other EU Member States to agree a collective approach. In light of growing concerns about the sustainability of the hunting of some species, stricter controls on the import of hunting trophies of six species, including lions and African elephants, have been introduced. As a result, the import of hunting trophies of certain species from certain countries is currently prohibited.</p><p> </p><p>The Government considers that properly managed, legal and sustainable trophy hunting can play a part in species conservation efforts, including by providing an important source of funding for conservation in some countries. In view of this, we have no plans to introduce legislation banning the import of all trophies of endangered or threatened species. We will however continue to monitor the impact of trophy hunting and will work to put in place greater protection, including prohibiting imports, if this is shown to be needed.</p><p> </p><p>For example, in recognition of the real concerns about the impact of trophy hunting on lion conservation, I announced in Parliament on 24 November 2015 that the Government will ban lion trophy imports by the end of 2017 unless there are improvements in the way hunting takes place in certain countries, judged against strict criteria. We will work with our European and international partners, and experts in the field, to reach a common approach to this issue.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-06-28T09:24:00.857Zmore like thismore than 2016-06-28T09:24:00.857Z
star this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart remove filter
star this property tabling member
304
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Roger Godsiff more like this
529820
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-06-29more like thismore than 2016-06-29
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Animal Products: Imports remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 28 June 2016 to Question 40996, what statistics the Government collects on the number of hunting trophies from endangered or threatened species which are brought in to the UK; and how the Government defines the sustainable hunting of such species. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Birmingham, Hall Green more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Roger Godsiff more like this
star this property uin 41469 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-07-06more like thismore than 2016-07-06
star this property answer text <p>The UK Management Authority (UKMA), which administers the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), holds data on imports of hunting trophies into the UK from outside the EU of the most endangered species listed on Annex A of the EU Wildlife Trade Regulations and for six less endangered Annex B species which are subject to stricter controls.</p><p> </p><p>As part of the application process for an import permit, the UKMA must consider whether the import would be harmful to the conservation of the species or on the extent of the territory it occupies. This is called a ‘non-detriment finding’. For animal imports, this determination is made by our scientific advisors, the Joint Nature Conservation Committee, which considers any opinions of the EU’s group of scientific experts in CITES, the Scientific Review Group, and examines available data, taking into account a wide range of factors including the biological status of the species, management programmes in place and trade levels.</p><p> </p><p>Information on how a non-detriment finding is made can be found in CITES Conference Resolution 16.7 (<a href="https://cites.org/eng/res/16/16-07.php" target="_blank">https://cites.org/eng/res/16/16-07.php</a>) and the reference guide to the EU Wildlife Trade Regulations (<a href="http://ec.europa.eu/environment/cites/legis_refguide_en.htm" target="_blank">http://ec.europa.eu/environment/cites/legis_refguide_en.htm</a>).</p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-07-06T11:45:52.613Zmore like thismore than 2016-07-06T11:45:52.613Z
star this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart remove filter
star this property tabling member
304
unstar this property label Biography information for Mr Roger Godsiff more like this
524954
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-06-14more like thismore than 2016-06-14
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Animal Products: Imports remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether she plans to prohibit the import of trophies from any CITES Appendix I or Appendix II listed species. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Crawley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Henry Smith more like this
star this property uin 40644 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-06-27more like thismore than 2016-06-27
star this property answer text <p>Under international rules set by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES), a hunting trophy from a species listed on Appendix I or Appendix II of the Convention can be exported only if the exporting country is satisfied that the hunt was both legal and sustainable.</p><p> </p><p>Importing controls are implemented at an EU-wide level and the UK works with other EU Member States to agree a collective approach. In light of growing concerns about the sustainability of the hunting of some species, stricter controls on the import of hunting trophies of six species, including lions and African elephants, have been introduced. As a result, the import of hunting trophies of certain species from certain countries is currently prohibited.</p><p> </p><p>The Government considers that properly managed, legal and sustainable trophy hunting can play a part in species conservation efforts, including by providing an important source of funding for conservation in some countries. In view of this, we have no plans to introduce legislation banning the import of all trophies of Appendix I and II species. We will however continue to monitor the impact of trophy hunting and will work to put in place greater protection, including prohibiting imports, if this is shown to be needed.</p><p> </p><p>For example, in recognition of the real concerns about the impact of trophy hunting on lion conservation, I announced in Parliament on 24 November 2015 that the Government will ban lion trophy imports by the end of 2017 unless there are improvements in the way hunting takes place in certain countries, judged against strict criteria. We will work with our European and international partners, and experts in the field, to reach a common approach to this issue.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-06-27T12:07:10.127Zmore like thismore than 2016-06-27T12:07:10.127Z
star this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart remove filter
star this property tabling member
3960
unstar this property label Biography information for Henry Smith more like this
447221
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-01-25more like thismore than 2016-01-25
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Animal Products: Imports remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to prohibit the importation of trophies secured from the killing of (a) lions, (b) elephants and (c) other mammals in (i) Tanzania, (ii) Zimbabwe and (iii) other African countries. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr Paul Monaghan more like this
star this property uin 23807 more like this
unstar this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-02-02more like thismore than 2016-02-02
star this property answer text <p>The international rules for the import and export of hunting trophies are established under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). A hunting trophy of an endangered species can only be exported if the exporting country is satisfied that the hunt was both legal and sustainable. CITES controls are implemented at an EU-wide level and the UK works with other EU Member States to agree a collective approach.</p><p> </p><p>In light of growing concerns about the sustainability of the hunting of some species, the EU has introduced stricter controls on the import of hunting trophies of six species, including lions and African elephants. These require that both the exporting and importing country must be satisfied that the animal was hunted sustainably. As a result the import of hunting trophies of certain species from certain countries is currently prohibited by the EU, including lion trophies from Cameroon and Mozambique and elephant trophies from Tanzania. Imports of lion and elephant trophies from Zimbabwe are currently allowed into the EU as they are considered to be sustainable. The import of lion trophies from Tanzania is under consideration by the Scientific Review Group, which brings together the Scientific Authorities of EU Member States to provide advice on CITES matters and which is expected to decide at its next meeting whether the importation of lion trophies from Tanzania should be prohibited.</p><p> </p><p>A full list of EU CITES trade suspensions can be found at: <a href="http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32015R0736" target="_blank">http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=CELEX:32015R0736</a></p><p> </p><p>I recognise that there are real concerns about the impact of trophy hunting on lion conservation. As I announced in Parliament on 24 November 2015, the Government will ban lion trophy imports within the next two years unless there are improvements in the way hunting takes place in certain countries, judged against strict criteria. We will work with our European and international partners, and experts in the field, to reach a common approach to this issue.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Penrith and The Border more like this
star this property answering member printed Rory Stewart more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-02-02T08:57:26.397Zmore like thismore than 2016-02-02T08:57:26.397Z
star this property answering member
4137
star this property label Biography information for Rory Stewart remove filter
star this property tabling member
4383
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Paul Monaghan more like this