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100054
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-10-21more like thismore than 2014-10-21
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading European Arrest Warrants more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the event of the United Kingdom not opting back into the provisions of the European Arrest Warrant, which member states still have on their statute books the legislation necessary to revert to the Council of Europe Convention on Extradition 1957. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Inglewood more like this
star this property uin HL2260 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-17more like thismore than 2014-11-17
star this property answer text <p>All EU member states have ratified the 1957 Council of Europe Convention on Extradition (ECE). Consequently, they will all have legislation that allows them to operate the ECE with other ECE signatories who do not use the Arrest Warrant. However, a number of EU member states have subsequently passed specific legislation to implement the Arrest Warrant and would need to pass new domestic legislation in order to allow them to operate the ECE with the UK. In some cases, this could be a lengthy process. For example, we believe that it would take the Netherlands at least a year to pass the necessary legislation and during this time they would not be able to issue extradition requests to the UK, or respond to UK extradition requests. Effectively, this would make both countries a safe haven for each others’ criminals.<br><br>Under the 1957 European Convention on Extradition, 22 Member States may also refuse to extradite its own nationals which means that some people may never face justice. In non-European Arrest Warrant cases, the following EU Member States have an absolute bar on extraditing their own nationals to the UK:<br><br>Austria<br>Belgium<br>Czech Republic<br>Finland <br>France<br>Germany<br>Greece<br>Latvia<br>Luxembourg<br>Slovakia<br>Slovenia<br>Spain<br>Sweden<br><br>A further nine have made declarations to the 1957 European Convention on Extradition to the effect that they will not extradite their own nationals:<br><br>Bulgaria<br>Croatia<br>Cyprus<br>Estonia<br>Hungary<br>Lithuania<br>Poland<br>Portugal<br>Romania</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-17T12:19:37.777Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-17T12:19:37.777Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates remove filter
star this property tabling member
1980
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Inglewood remove filter
849928
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-02-26more like thismore than 2018-02-26
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tax Yields more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made on the effect on tax revenues of a one per cent (1) increase, and (2) decrease, in GNP. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Inglewood more like this
star this property uin HL5882 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-03-12more like thismore than 2018-03-12
star this property answer text <p>The effect of changes in total economic output on tax revenues will depend upon the composition of any aggregate change, since the underlying tax bases (earnings, profits, consumption and so on) will be affected in different ways by different components of total output. For this reason, the Government does not hold a single estimate of the effects that changes to GNP (Gross National Product) would have on tax revenues.</p><p> </p><p>The Office for Budget Responsibility publishes tax and spending ready reckoners. These ready reckoners show how changes to components of GDP (Gross Domestic Product) would affect tax receipts, alongside the effects of other economic variables. For example, a one percent increase in employment in 2018-19 is expected to increase tax revenues by £2.7bn in that year.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-03-12T13:15:45.493Zmore like thismore than 2018-03-12T13:15:45.493Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates remove filter
star this property tabling member
1980
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Inglewood remove filter