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418092
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-09-09more like thismore than 2015-09-09
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, how much (a) the UK Border Force and (b) HM Revenue and Customs spent on delivering the Government's tobacco smuggling strategy in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sherwood more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mark Spencer more like this
unstar this property uin 9684 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-12more like thismore than 2015-10-12
star this property answer text <p>The total spent by HMRC on delivering the Government’s strategy to tackle tobacco smuggling in each of the last five years is as follows:</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>2014/15</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>£65.75m</p></td><td><p>£68.92m</p></td><td><p>£67.61m</p></td><td><p>£76.00m</p></td><td><p>£78.001m</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p>Border Force cannot provide the information requested without incurring disproportionate costs.</p><p>Border Force adopts an intelligence led approach to all of its customs activities, including tackling tobacco smuggling so that its multi-functional resources can be deployed as effectively as possible in line with latest threat assessments.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-12T13:53:11.473Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-12T13:53:11.473Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4055
unstar this property label Biography information for Mark Spencer more like this
418090
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-09-09more like thismore than 2015-09-09
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, column 210W, on tobacco: smuggling, how many people were convicted in relation to seizures made by the Border Force and HM Revenue and Customs in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sherwood more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mark Spencer more like this
unstar this property uin 9679 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-12more like thismore than 2015-10-12
star this property answer text <p>HM Revenue &amp; Customs (HMRC) is not a prosecuting authority. Where cases handled by HMRC do proceed to the criminal courts the prosecution is carried out by the relevant independent prosecuting authority. This is the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) in England and Wales, the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (COPFS) in Scotland, and the Public Prosecution Service for Northern Ireland (PPSNI).</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-12T13:47:44.517Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-12T13:47:44.517Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4055
unstar this property label Biography information for Mark Spencer more like this
418091
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-09-09more like thismore than 2015-09-09
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, with reference to the Answer of 30 October 2012, Official Report, column 210W, on tobacco: smuggling, how many individual seizures were made by the Border Force and HM Revenue and Customs in each of the last five years; and what the total volume of the products seized in each year was. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sherwood more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mark Spencer more like this
unstar this property uin 9678 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-22more like thismore than 2015-10-22
star this property answer text <p>To the extent that we are able to provide details, the following tables show the number of individual seizures of cigarettes and hand-rolling tobacco (HRT) made in each of the last five years and the total volume of tobacco products seized. This does not include the number of individual overseas seizures, which are not recorded centrally, or the number of individual postal seizures from 2010-11 when a new information system was introduced.</p><br /><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Cigarettes: Number of Seizures</p></td><td><p>HMRC</p></td><td><p>UKBF</p></td><td><p>Overseas</p></td><td><p>Total</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>2,011</p></td><td><p>28,787</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>30798</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>1,845</p></td><td><p>28,750</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>30595</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>1,215</p></td><td><p>30,011</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>31226</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>543</p></td><td><p>35,622</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>36165</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>582</p></td><td><p>39,578</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>40160</p></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Cigarettes: Quantity (Sticks)</p></td><td><p>HMRC</p></td><td><p>UKBF</p></td><td><p>Overseas</p></td><td><p>Total</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>76,559,489</p></td><td><p>650,060,670</p></td><td><p>991,713,280</p></td><td><p>1,718,333,439</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>142,230,184</p></td><td><p>455,174,133</p></td><td><p>1,134,984,800</p></td><td><p>1,732,389,117</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>98,477,437</p></td><td><p>487,835,338</p></td><td><p>1,271,622,181</p></td><td><p>1,857,934,956</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>59,599,120</p></td><td><p>318,880,074</p></td><td><p>1,058,975,055</p></td><td><p>1,437,454,249</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>75,953,705</p></td><td><p>439,018,394</p></td><td><p>1,252,616,840</p></td><td><p>1,767,588,939</p></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table><tbody><tr><td><p>HRT: Number of Seizures.</p></td><td><p>HMRC</p></td><td><p>UKBF</p></td><td><p>Overseas</p></td><td><p>Total</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>1,596</p></td><td><p>10,814</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>12,410</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>1,567</p></td><td><p>11,533</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>13,100</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>1,044</p></td><td><p>12,552</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>13,596</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>461</p></td><td><p>12,057</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>12,518</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>411</p></td><td><p>12,804</p></td><td><p>N/A</p></td><td><p>13,215</p></td></tr></tbody></table><br /><table><tbody><tr><td><p>HRT: Quantity (Kgs)</p></td><td><p>HMRC</p></td><td><p>UKBF</p></td><td><p>Overseas</p></td><td><p>Total</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010/11</p></td><td><p>46,741</p></td><td><p>314,775</p></td><td><p>27,889</p></td><td><p>389,405</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011/12</p></td><td><p>56,295</p></td><td><p>508,112</p></td><td><p>7,815</p></td><td><p>572,222</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012/13</p></td><td><p>67,872</p></td><td><p>359,635</p></td><td><p>55,658</p></td><td><p>483,165</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013/14</p></td><td><p>32,921</p></td><td><p>262,873</p></td><td><p>34,200</p></td><td><p>329,994</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014/15</p></td><td><p>57,183</p></td><td><p>227,928</p></td><td><p>27,901</p></td><td><p>313,012</p></td></tr></tbody></table>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-22T16:16:56.613Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-22T16:16:56.613Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4055
unstar this property label Biography information for Mark Spencer more like this
390183
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-07-15more like thismore than 2015-07-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment HM Revenue and Customs has made of the effectiveness of the Codentify tracking and tracing system in preventing illicit trade in tobacco; and whether his Department plans to commission an independent assessment of the potential for that system to meet the requirement for a tracking and tracing system under the EU Tobacco Products Directive. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Liverpool, Wavertree more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Luciana Berger more like this
unstar this property uin 7477 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-07-20more like thismore than 2015-07-20
star this property answer text <p>The European Commission is still considering the options for implementation of the requirement for a tracking and tracing system under the EU Tobacco Products Directive, and no potential systems will be evaluated until that work is concluded.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-07-20T13:50:52.927Zmore like thismore than 2015-07-20T13:50:52.927Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4036
unstar this property label Biography information for Luciana Berger more like this
475625
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will take steps to ensure that the Codentify system is not advantaged over other available systems in any future decision on tobacco product authentication systems to be used by his Department. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
unstar this property uin 31262 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.353Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.353Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this
475624
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the cost to the public purse is of (a) access by HM Revenue and Customs to the Codentify system to pilot its use for tobacco product authentication, (b) staff time to use that system and (c) other costs incurred through use of that system. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
unstar this property uin 31261 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.29Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.29Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this
475623
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether officials of (a) HM Revenue and Customs, (b) Border Force and (c) trading standards services are being trained in the use of Codentify to authenticate tobacco products. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
unstar this property uin 31260 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.2Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.2Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this
475621
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether HM Revenue and Customs conducted an open tender exercise to select the Codentify system for piloting as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
unstar this property uin 31259 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31258 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.137Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.137Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this
475620
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, which Ministers were involved in the decision for HM Revenue and Customs to pilot Codentify as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
unstar this property uin 31258 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31257 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.057Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:40.057Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this
475619
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what (a) policy and (b) operational reasons HM Revenue and Customs decided to pilot Codentify as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
unstar this property uin 31257 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Damian Hinds more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.997Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.997Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this