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518955
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-05-18more like thismore than 2016-05-18
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Soft Drinks: Taxation more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, at what threshold importers of soft drinks from outside the UK would be liable for the soft drinks industry levy. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency North Antrim more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ian Paisley more like this
star this property uin 37320 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-05-23more like thismore than 2016-05-23
star this property answer text <p>As the Chancellor announced at Budget, the levy will not be charged to the smallest operators. We will consult on the most appropriate mechanism for achieving this.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-05-23T14:05:41.337Zmore like thismore than 2016-05-23T14:05:41.337Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4129
unstar this property label Biography information for Ian Paisley more like this
475619
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tobacco: Smuggling more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what (a) policy and (b) operational reasons HM Revenue and Customs decided to pilot Codentify as a tobacco product authentication tool. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Livingston more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Hannah Bardell more like this
star this property uin 31257 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-23more like thismore than 2016-03-23
star this property answer text <p>Tobacco products classified as ‘illicit’ in the UK include anything on which duty has not been paid but should have been paid. This includes counterfeit products, brands manufactured legally overseas but not legally sold in the UK, and genuine products originating in the UK and overseas but diverted from legitimate supply chains by criminals. Because of this, HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) officers use a variety of ways to identify illicit product. Testing product authenticity is one mechanism.</p><p> </p><p>To test product authenticity, HMRC uses identifiers required by legislation, for example, Fiscal Marks which manufacturers are required to print on specified tobacco products to show they are UK duty paid, as well as voluntary tools used by the manufacturers. One such voluntary tool is Codentify.</p><p> </p><p>Codentify was developed and introduced by the major tobacco manufacturers on their own initiative through the Digital Coding and Tracking Association (DCTA). HMRC played no part in the development or introduction of the system nor did HMRC require that it be introduced. Codentify codes already feature on packs and are there regardless of any HMRC use of them. HMRC took a policy decision, in line with the commitment to tackle illicit tobacco, to examine whether these existing codes could provide a useful additional tool to help officers authenticate product in the field.</p><p> </p><p>The trial is concerned only with the use of Codentify for product authentication, and no other aspect of the system is being used or evaluated. Codentify requires no specialist equipment or training. Officers are provided with basic guidance and access to an online system. No charge is made for use of the system and, as no procurement was needed, there was no requirement for HMRC to run a tender exercise. As this is a trial only, no Ministerial approval was required or has been sought.</p><p> </p><p>A number of HMRC officers have been given access to the system and trained by HMRC colleagues. The time spent on this activity is minimal and is estimated to be less than one staff year in total.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has explained the use of Codentify as a potential product authentication tool to colleagues in Border Force and Trading Standards. However, they have not provided training to any officers in those organisations.</p><p> </p><p>The EU Tobacco Products Directive introduces a requirement for a pan European security feature and track and trace systems. The European Commission, working with Member States, is considering proposals and have yet to determine any technical specifications,</p><p> </p><p>HMRC is aware of a wide range of potential track and trace and security feature solutions on the market. They are not evaluating, and, given the current position on the Directive, could not evaluate any products against its requirements. The aspects of Codentify being used are entirely separate from the requirements of the Directive.</p><p> </p><p>In accordance with regulatory requirements, when technical specifications are determined, HMRC will ensure that any evaluation against them ensures no unfair competitive advantage or obstacles to competition.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
31255 more like this
31256 more like this
31258 more like this
31259 more like this
31260 more like this
31261 more like this
31262 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.997Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-23T14:27:39.997Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4486
unstar this property label Biography information for Hannah Bardell more like this
429463
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-11-19more like thismore than 2015-11-19
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Welfare Tax Credits more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons expenditure on personal tax credits has increased since 2009. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Pontypridd more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Owen Smith more like this
star this property uin 17065 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-30more like thismore than 2015-11-30
star this property answer text <p>The OBR’s Welfare Trends Report 2014 sets out how historical spending changes have been driven by, for example, changes to caseloads and average awards.</p><br /><p>As it sets out, policy decisions between 2003 and 2009 increased the caseload of tax credit claimants and increased discretionary uprating of the child element, contributing to expenditure as a percentage of GDP increasing from 1.1% in 2003/04 to 1.9% in 2009/10.</p><br /><p>By 2010, 9 out of 10 families with children were eligible for tax credits. Reforms under the Coalition government decreased this to 6 out of 10.</p><br /><p>http://budgetresponsibility.org.uk/wordpress/docs/Welfare_trends_report_2014_dn2B.pdf</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-30T17:01:26.61Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-30T17:01:26.61Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4042
unstar this property label Biography information for Owen Smith more like this
419480
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-09-17more like thismore than 2015-09-17
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Opencast Mining: Scotland more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons his Department determined that addressing liabilities relating to unrestored coal mines in Scotland was a devolved matter. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Kilmarnock and Loudoun more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Alan Brown more like this
star this property uin 10608 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-21more like thismore than 2015-10-21
star this property answer text <p>Environmental protection is a devolved matter, and outstanding land restoration liabilities lie with the relevant local authorities and ultimately with the Scottish Government. The Treasury has fully considered the two proposals put to them for addressing the shortfall of land restoration on abandoned Scottish coal mines: an exemption from the Carbon Price Support (CPS) tax and a direct grant from the Exchequer. Following discussions with Hargreaves, the UK Coal Authority, the Scotland Office, the Scottish Government and DECC, the Treasury has had to decline both proposals after thorough consideration. The reasons for this include: - Addressing the shortfall in land restoration is not the responsibility of the UK Government. Environmental protection is a devolved matter, and outstanding land restoration liabilities lie with the relevant local authorities. - The proposals are unaffordable in the current fiscal climate. They would also set a precedent that would risk discouraging companies and local authorities from making proper financial provision for the cost of site restoration and future environmental liabilities. - A CPS exemption would be an inefficient means of addressing the shortfall of land restoration, as the money would not go directly towards this aim and it would incur significant administration costs. - A CPS exemption would distort the market by making non-exempt coal less competitive, and by discouraging investment in low carbon power generation. I have written to the Scottish Government’s Minister for Business, Energy and Tourism informing him of this decision and I would be happy to consider any other options put forward.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
10601 more like this
10603 more like this
10604 more like this
10605 more like this
10606 more like this
10609 more like this
10610 more like this
10611 more like this
10612 more like this
10615 more like this
11469 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-21T13:33:15.877Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-21T13:33:15.877Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4470
unstar this property label Biography information for Alan Brown more like this
420349
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Child Tax Credit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons his Department has not published a distributional analysis showing the effect on families of the reduction of the higher income threshold for child tax credit from £16,105 to £12,125. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Edinburgh South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
star this property uin 10781 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-20more like thismore than 2015-10-20
star this property answer text <p>The Summer Budget offered a new deal for working people. It means Britain moving from a high welfare, high tax, low wage economy to a lower welfare, lower tax, higher wage society.</p><br /><p>A new National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and above, initially set at £7.20 per hour from April 2016, will directly benefit 2.7 million low wage workers, and up to 6 million could see a pay rise as a result of a ripple effect up the earnings distribution. The new National Living Wage will boost pay for those currently earning the National Minimum Wage by £4,800 a year by 2020 when the National Living Wage is expected to rise to over £9 per hour.</p><br /><p>To help working families keep more of what they earn, the personal allowance will increase to £11,000 in 2016-17 and £11,200 in 2017-18. The government has committed to increase the personal allowance to £12,500 by 2020 which will mean that a typical basic rate taxpayer will see their income tax cut by £1,205 a year compared to 2010.</p><br /><p>The government set out its assessment of the impacts of the Summer Budget policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20<sup>th</sup> July 2015. Taken together, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases in the personal allowance and welfare changes mean that 8 out of 10 working households will be better off as a result of the Summer Budget.</p><br /><p>In response to a request from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee, the government has chosen to produce and release an impact assessment on the tax credit changes to the Committee. The impact assessment shows that 60% of the tax credit savings come from the half of tax credit claimants with the highest income.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
10782 more like this
10783 more like this
10784 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.22Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.22Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
3966
unstar this property label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
420351
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-09more like thismore than 2015-10-09
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015 more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons his Department has not undertaken and published an impact assessment for the Tax Credits (Income Thresholds and Determination of Rates) (Amendment) Regulations 2015. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Edinburgh South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Ian Murray more like this
star this property uin 10783 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-20more like thismore than 2015-10-20
star this property answer text <p>The Summer Budget offered a new deal for working people. It means Britain moving from a high welfare, high tax, low wage economy to a lower welfare, lower tax, higher wage society.</p><br /><p>A new National Living Wage for workers aged 25 and above, initially set at £7.20 per hour from April 2016, will directly benefit 2.7 million low wage workers, and up to 6 million could see a pay rise as a result of a ripple effect up the earnings distribution. The new National Living Wage will boost pay for those currently earning the National Minimum Wage by £4,800 a year by 2020 when the National Living Wage is expected to rise to over £9 per hour.</p><br /><p>To help working families keep more of what they earn, the personal allowance will increase to £11,000 in 2016-17 and £11,200 in 2017-18. The government has committed to increase the personal allowance to £12,500 by 2020 which will mean that a typical basic rate taxpayer will see their income tax cut by £1,205 a year compared to 2010.</p><br /><p>The government set out its assessment of the impacts of the Summer Budget policies in the Welfare Reform and Work Bill on 20<sup>th</sup> July 2015. Taken together, the introduction of the National Living Wage, increases in the personal allowance and welfare changes mean that 8 out of 10 working households will be better off as a result of the Summer Budget.</p><br /><p>In response to a request from the Secondary Legislation Scrutiny Committee, the government has chosen to produce and release an impact assessment on the tax credit changes to the Committee. The impact assessment shows that 60% of the tax credit savings come from the half of tax credit claimants with the highest income.</p>
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
10781 more like this
10782 more like this
10784 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.37Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-20T11:19:13.37Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
3966
unstar this property label Biography information for Ian Murray more like this
475816
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-03-15more like thismore than 2016-03-15
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Motor Vehicles: Liquefied Petroleum Gas more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons private cars that have been converted to LPG only receive a discount on Vehicle Excise Duty instead of being reclassified according to their new carbon dioxide emissions rating. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Aldridge-Brownhills more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Wendy Morton more like this
star this property uin 31149 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-03-21more like thismore than 2016-03-21
star this property answer text <p>The government estimates that the cost of a formal laboratory test to recertify carbon dioxide (CO<sub>2</sub>) emission values for converted vehicles is in many cases greater than the lifetime VED savings that would be due to the motorist for that vehicle. It is therefore impractical to conduct such tests on a widespread basis.</p><p> </p><p>Instead the government offers a £10 discount to VED rates for any vehicle that has been converted to use LPG, without the need for formal laboratory retesting.</p><p> </p><p>Vehicles using LPG also benefit from reduced fuel duty costs relative to petrol and diesel.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-03-21T15:44:47.73Zmore like thismore than 2016-03-21T15:44:47.73Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4358
unstar this property label Biography information for Wendy Morton more like this
432647
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-11-26more like thismore than 2015-11-26
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Carbon Capture and Storage more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons the closure of the competition for carbon capture and storage projects was announced on a Stock Market news website on 25 November 2015, in advance of the Autumn Statement and Spending Review 2015. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Newport West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Paul Flynn more like this
star this property uin 17999 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-12-03more like thismore than 2015-12-03
star this property answer text <p>Following the Chancellor’s Autumn Statement, it was announced on the London Stock Exchange at 2:57pm on 25 November 2015 that HMG is not providing £1bn capital grant funding.</p><br /><p>We have not taken this decision lightly. However, this was a tight financial settlement and difficult decisions have had to be made. Support for the CCS competition projects has always been conditional on affordability and value for money.</p><br /><p>This decision means that the CCS Competition cannot proceed on its current basis. CCS has a potential role in the long-term decarbonisation of the UK and the government is engaging closely with the bidders on the implications of this decision for them.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-12-03T16:58:52.67Zmore like thismore than 2015-12-03T16:58:52.67Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
545
unstar this property label Biography information for Paul Flynn more like this
524655
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2016-06-13more like thismore than 2016-06-13
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name CaTreasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Child Benefit more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons the income of the highest-earning parent is used to assess eligibility for child benefit rather than the joint incomes of both parents. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Motherwell and Wishaw more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Marion Fellows more like this
star this property uin 40400 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2016-06-21more like thismore than 2016-06-21
star this property answer text <p>If the Government were to use total household income as the criteria for the High Income Child Benefit Charge on households, this would require collecting information of the incomes of everyone in each of the eight million households receiving Child Benefit. This would effectively introduce a new means test. The Government’s approach withdraws Child Benefit from those on high incomes, whilst having no impact on the majority of claimants.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2016-06-21T12:48:14.75Zmore like thismore than 2016-06-21T12:48:14.75Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4440
unstar this property label Biography information for Marion Fellows more like this
348973
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-06-08more like thismore than 2015-06-08
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
star this property hansard heading Fuels: Rebates more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, for what reasons the proprietors of fuel stations in Durness and Scourie have not been reimbursed through the rural fuel rebate scheme for fuel duty reductions they have passed to customers in the IV27 postcode area for claims submitted on 10 May and 1 June 2015. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Caithness, Sutherland and Easter Ross more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr Paul Monaghan more like this
star this property uin 1383 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-06-11more like thismore than 2015-06-11
star this property answer text <p>HMRC has a duty to maintain taxpayer confidentiality and cannot comment on individual circumstances.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>All claims made for Rural Fuel Duty Relief should be paid provided they meet the criteria set out in the Excise Notice (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/excise-notice-2001-rural-fuel-duty-relief-scheme/excise-notice-2001-rural-fuel-duty-relief-scheme).</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency East Hampshire more like this
unstar this property answering member printed Damian Hinds remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-06-11T15:36:30.537Zmore like thismore than 2015-06-11T15:36:30.537Z
star this property answering member
3969
star this property label Biography information for Mr Damian Hinds more like this
star this property tabling member
4383
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr Paul Monaghan more like this