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1133783
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-20more like thismore than 2019-06-20
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Gambling: Taxation more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what gambling activities are subject to (1) value-added tax, and (2) gross profits tax; and how much value-added tax was collected from adult gaming centres in England and Wales in (a) 2017, and (b) 2018. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Browne of Belmont more like this
star this property uin HL16534 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-03more like thismore than 2019-07-03
star this property answer text <p>(1) Almost all gambling activities are exempt from value added tax (VAT). However, VAT does apply to prize machines that offer non-cash prizes only. Such machines are not typically located in adult gaming centres.</p><p> </p><p>(2) There are seven Gambling Duties. Of these, six are based broadly on a gross profits tax model. The seventh, Lottery Duty is based on a percentage of the value of ticket sales.</p><p> </p><p>Total receipts from Betting and Gaming are published on the UK Trade Information website. A separate breakdown for value added tax collected from adult gaming centres in England and Wales is not available.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-03T12:01:46.77Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-03T12:01:46.77Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
3801
star this property label Biography information for Lord Browne of Belmont more like this
923005
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-06-12more like thismore than 2018-06-12
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Regulation more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how many regulatory agencies were operating in the UK in 2017–18; and what was the total annual running cost of those agencies. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Smith of Clifton more like this
star this property uin HL8578 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-06-21more like thismore than 2018-06-21
star this property answer text <p>61 Arm’s Length Bodies with regulatory functions are listed in the Cabinet Office publication <em>Public Bodies 2017</em>. Many of these bodies also have non-regulatory functions. This publication does not include regulators operating as part of Government departments, outside central government, in devolved or local government, nor those which remain unclassified. The running cost of these bodies is set out in <em>Public Bodies 2017</em>, but this includes the cost of non-regulatory functions – the running cost of regulatory functions is not separately identified.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-06-21T14:06:41.567Zmore like thismore than 2018-06-21T14:06:41.567Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
3144
star this property label Biography information for Lord Smith of Clifton more like this
1061363
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-02-14more like thismore than 2019-02-14
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Public Sector: Billing more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government who is responsible for auditing the payment performance data published by public authorities as required by sections 113(7) and 113(8) of the Public Service Contracts Regulations 2015; and what processes they use for such audits. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
star this property uin HL13743 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction true more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-02-20more like thismore than 2019-02-20
star this property answer text <p><del class="ministerial">Details of central government contracts above the value of £10,000 and wider public sector contracts above the value of £25,000 are published on Contracts Finder.</del></p><p> </p><p><ins class="ministerial">Public procurement regulations do not contain requirements for public bodies to include auditing or whistleblowing policies in the operational delivery and management of public contracts.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">Public bodies in scope of these regulations are individually responsible for ensuring the accuracy of their own data prior to publication, and operate their own whistleblowing policies.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">The Government encourages whistleblowers to get independent advice (e.g. from Citizens Advice) to ensure that they are adequately protected.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">Public sector suppliers that have not been paid on time can raise the issue with the Public Procurement Review Service.</ins></p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-20T11:32:53.117Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-20T11:32:53.117Z
star this property question first ministerially corrected
less than 2019-02-21T14:27:38.357Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-21T14:27:38.357Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property previous answer version
103260
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4286
star this property label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
1002492
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-06more like thismore than 2018-11-06
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Gulf National Security Secretariat Implementation Group more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what role, if any, the Gulf National Security Secretariat Implementation Group (NSSIG) has within the Cabinet Office; and how the role and responsibilities of the NSSIG differs from those of the Integrated Delivery Board. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Scriven more like this
star this property uin HL11333 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction true more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-20more like thismore than 2018-11-20
star this property answer text <p><del class="ministerial">The requested information is not readily available. The information requested can only be provided at disproportionate cost. </del></p><p><ins class="ministerial"><strong><em> </em></strong></ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">National Security Strategy and Implementation Groups (NSSIGs) were established after the 2017 National Security Capability Review to support the delivery of national security priority programmes, including by better utilising the full range of national security capabilities. Each NSSIG is chaired by a Senior Responsible Official (SRO), who is accountable to the National Security Council.</ins></p><p><ins class="ministerial">The Gulf Delivery Board has not met since the establishment of the Gulf &amp; Iran NSSIG, which subsumed its primary roles and responsibilities in April 2018. Cabinet Office officials are members of the Gulf &amp; Iran NSSIG and attend all meetings. The Cabinet Office also provides some secretariat support to the NSSIG, alongside that provided by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.</ins></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-20T16:57:28.727Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T16:57:28.727Z
star this property question first ministerially corrected
less than 2018-11-20T17:09:59.22Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-20T17:09:59.22Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property previous answer version
86171
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4333
star this property label Biography information for Lord Scriven more like this
1130253
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-05more like thismore than 2019-06-05
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Mortgages more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the consequences for depositor protection and financial stability from the number of lenders offering residential property mortgage loans at 95 per cent of value or higher; and what options are open to (1) them, (2) the Bank of England, and (3) the Prudential Regulation Authority, to protect depositors and ensure financial stability. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Myners more like this
star this property uin HL16114 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answer text <p><em>The Financial Policy Committee (FPC) of the Bank of England was set up to identify, monitor and take action to remove or reduce systemic risks with a view to protecting and enhancing the resilience of the UK financial system as part of the new financial regulatory framework legislated for under The Financial Services Act 2012. The FPC noted in their November 2018 Financial Stability Report that the share of households with high mortgage debt-servicing ratios (DSRs) is close to historical lows. The FPC has powers of direction to place limits on the proportion of new mortgages that a bank can extend at high LTV ratios, if it judges that this is required to mitigate financial stability risks.</em></p><p><em> </em></p><em> </em><p><em>While the Bank therefore has powers to tackle these risks, the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), set up by the Government in 2001, also provides a key role in ensuring financial stability and protecting depositors. The FSCS provides deposit protection of up to £85,000 per person, per authorised firm. The Financial Services Markets Act 2000 gives powers to the regulators, including the Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA) to make the rules in which FSCS carries out its compensation function.</em></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-19T16:43:39.46Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-19T16:43:39.46Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
3869
star this property label Biography information for Lord Myners more like this
1130250
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-05more like thismore than 2019-06-05
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Financial Markets more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have reviewed the market liquidity in the subprime sterling bond market in the context of increased bond issuance. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Myners more like this
star this property uin HL16111 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-06-19more like thismore than 2019-06-19
star this property answer text <p><em>The Financial Policy Committee (FPC) of the Bank of England was set up to identify, monitor and take action to remove or reduce systemic risks with a view to protecting and enhancing the resilience of the UK financial system as part of the new financial regulatory framework legislated for under The Financial Services Act 2012. The FPC set out its most recent assessment of financial stability risks, including from the sterling bond market, in its March 2019 Policy Summary, in which it noted that post-crisis reforms have made dealers, on which some markets rely, more resilient, reducing the probability that market-making losses could lead to their distress or failure. In addition, the FPC noted that during the more recent period of volatility at the end of 2018, pension funds and insurers had acted as net buyers of sterling corporate bonds. Notwithstanding this, new business models mean that liquidity conditions in corporate debt markets could change quickly in event of stress.</em> <em>However, overall the FPC judged that markets had proved able to function effectively through volatile periods, and the strength of the core financial system, including banks, dealers and insurance companies, would support the functioning of markets on which the economy relied.</em></p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-06-19T16:43:32.243Zmore like thismore than 2019-06-19T16:43:32.243Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
3869
star this property label Biography information for Lord Myners more like this
994364
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-10-24more like thismore than 2018-10-24
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Cybercrime more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their definition of what constitutes a cyber attack. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Viscount Waverley more like this
star this property uin HL11008 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-11-01more like thismore than 2018-11-01
star this property answer text <p><strong> </strong></p><p>The National Cyber Security Strategy 2016-2021 defines a cyber attack as the deliberate exploitation of computer systems, digitally dependent enterprises and networks to cause harm.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-11-01T12:54:07.407Zmore like thismore than 2018-11-01T12:54:07.407Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
1744
star this property label Biography information for Viscount Waverley more like this
1012114
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-11-21more like thismore than 2018-11-21
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Emergencies: Mobile Phones more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the reply by Lord Young of Cookham on 5 July (HL Deb, cols 766–70), what progress has been made in the introduction of mobile alert technology. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Harris of Haringey more like this
star this property uin HL11641 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-12-04more like thismore than 2018-12-04
star this property answer text <p><strong><em> </em></strong></p><p>Cabinet Office is working with the Home Office and the police to explore the types of emergency where a national mobile alerting system can add value, beyond the mobile alerting schemes already in place in the UK. In order to inform any technical solution, these emergency scenarios will be explored in depth to establish where and when in the evolution of an incident a mobile alerting scheme offers the best opportunity to reduce harm to citizens.</p><p>Once we have fully assessed the need for an alerting scheme further work would be undertaken including exploring how situational awareness might be obtained, thresholds for activation and how the content of alert messages stands the best chance of eliciting helpful behaviours from the recipients. This is not without complexity since in terrorist-related incidents the protagonists will also receive the same message.</p><p> </p><p>Additionally, a scheme used for major incidents stands the chance of being used infrequently. To ensure effectiveness, there will be a need for a carefully managed media campaigns.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-12-04T14:40:59.297Zmore like thismore than 2018-12-04T14:40:59.297Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2671
star this property label Biography information for Lord Harris of Haringey more like this
852486
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-02-28more like thismore than 2018-02-28
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Neonatal Mortality more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge more like this
star this property uin HL5969 more like this
star this property answer
answer
star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-03-14more like thismore than 2018-03-14
star this property answer text <p><strong><strong>​</strong></strong></p><p>The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.</p><p><em><strong>Letter from John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, to Baroness Tonge, dated 07 March 2018</strong></em></p><p>Dear Baroness Tonge,</p><p>As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Questions asking (a) whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years (HL5969); (b) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2000–05, (2) 2005–10, and (3) 2010–15 (HL5970); and (c) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17 (HL5971).</p><p>The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Statistics on deaths are normally published using calendar years. Neonatal mortality figures are available for both the year the death was registered and the year the death occurred. Comparisons over time are more meaningful using death occurrences, to allow for delays in registering deaths. The latest year for which death occurrence figures are available is 2015 [see note 1 below]. The neonatal mortality figures for 2016 will be published on 14 March 2018 and the data for 2017 will be published in early 2019.</p><p>Table 1 below provides the number of neonatal deaths and the neonatal mortality rates per 1,000 live births for England and Wales, for each calendar year from 2000 to 2015.</p><p>Because the number of neonatal deaths each year is relatively small, there is likely to be some random fluctuation, and no single year since 2000 shows a statistically significant change from the preceding year. However, there has been a generally downward trend throughout the period. In the five years 2011-15, the lowest neonatal mortality rate was in 2014, and this was significantly lower than in 2011 and all previous years. The rate in 2015 was higher than in 2014, but is still significantly lower than in 2011 (taking into account rounding of the figures to one decimal place).</p><p>NHS Digital is responsible for publishing statistics on NHS patient care in England. There is no widely accepted measure of neonatal morbidity, however trends in the admission of neonates to hospital may be useful information. Therefore, figures based on Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) have been given here.</p><p>Table 2 below provides the number of neonatal finished consultant episodes (FCEs) and corresponding neonatal hospitalisation rate per 1,000 live births for England, for each financial year from 2000-01 to 2016-17, and the five-year periods 2001-02 to 2004-05, 2005-06 to 2009-10, and 2010-11 to 2014-15. Note that HES data include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, e.g. 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013.</p><p>Changes to the HES figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information.</p><p>There has been year on year fluctuation in the number and rate of hospital episodes for neonates over the period of interest, but with a clear overall upward trend. The hospitalisation rate in 2015-16 was significantly higher than five years before. However, as noted above, it is likely that the trend is influenced to some extent by factors such as changing clinical practice and recording.</p><p>Yours sincerely,</p><p>John Pullinger</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Note 1:</p><p><a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales" target="_blank">https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales</a></p><p> </p><p>Table 1: Neonatal deaths occurring in England and Wales, numbers and rates, 2000 to 2015</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal deaths</p></td><td><p>Neonatal mortality rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000</p></td><td><p>2,335</p></td><td><p>3.9</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td><td><p>4.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001</p></td><td><p>2,137</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002</p></td><td><p>2,126</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003</p></td><td><p>2,264</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004</p></td><td><p>2,209</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005</p></td><td><p>2,227</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006</p></td><td><p>2,325</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007</p></td><td><p>2,248</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008</p></td><td><p>2,261</p></td><td><p>3.2</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2,205</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.0</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2,123</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,135</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,042</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>1,871</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>1,762</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.4</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>1,838</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal deaths are defined as deaths of live-born infants at less than 28 days</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p> </p><p>Source: Office for National Statistics</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Table 2: Neonatal hospital episodes occurring in England, numbers and rates, 2000-02 to 2016-17</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal episodes (FCEs)</p></td><td><p>Neonatal hospitalisation rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01</p></td><td><p>57,983</p></td><td><p>96.3</p></td><td><p>95.5</p></td><td><p>97.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001-02</p></td><td><p>56,097</p></td><td><p>94.3</p></td><td><p>93.5</p></td><td><p>95.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002-03</p></td><td><p>58,610</p></td><td><p>97.3</p></td><td><p>96.5</p></td><td><p>98.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003-04</p></td><td><p>64,574</p></td><td><p>103.1</p></td><td><p>102.4</p></td><td><p>103.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004-05</p></td><td><p>65,873</p></td><td><p>102.7</p></td><td><p>101.9</p></td><td><p>103.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06</p></td><td><p>69,000</p></td><td><p>105.9</p></td><td><p>105.1</p></td><td><p>106.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006-07</p></td><td><p>74,893</p></td><td><p>111.0</p></td><td><p>110.2</p></td><td><p>111.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007-08</p></td><td><p>84,755</p></td><td><p>122.0</p></td><td><p>121.2</p></td><td><p>122.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008-09</p></td><td><p>91,420</p></td><td><p>129.1</p></td><td><p>128.3</p></td><td><p>129.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009-10</p></td><td><p>96,005</p></td><td><p>135.1</p></td><td><p>134.3</p></td><td><p>136.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11</p></td><td><p>102,847</p></td><td><p>142.2</p></td><td><p>141.3</p></td><td><p>143.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011-12</p></td><td><p>101,577</p></td><td><p>140.0</p></td><td><p>139.2</p></td><td><p>140.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012-13</p></td><td><p>106,531</p></td><td><p>147.6</p></td><td><p>146.7</p></td><td><p>148.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013-14</p></td><td><p>109,509</p></td><td><p>157.0</p></td><td><p>156.0</p></td><td><p>157.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014-15</p></td><td><p>114,229</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.2</p></td><td><p>165.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015-16</p></td><td><p>114,420</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.1</p></td><td><p>165.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016-17*</p></td><td><p>116,573</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01 to 2004-05†</p></td><td><p>301,700</p></td><td><p>98.4</p></td><td><p>98.0</p></td><td><p>98.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06 to 2009-10†</p></td><td><p>414,060</p></td><td><p>120.4</p></td><td><p>120.0</p></td><td><p>120.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11 to 2014-15†</p></td><td><p>532,149</p></td><td><p>149.3</p></td><td><p>148.9</p></td><td><p>149.7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal episodes are defined as counts of patients where there is a finished consultant episode (FCE) for neonates with an extended hospital stay immediately following birth, or an admission within the first 28 days of life. An FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births. The number of births per financial year has been estimated based on births in the relevant calendar years.</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p><em>* A rate for 2016-17 cannot be calculated as the number of births in 2017 is not yet available.</em></p><p><em>† As a patient may have been in hospital in two consecutive years, the total per five-year grouping will not be equal to a sum of the corresponding five individual years.</em></p><p> </p><p><em>Source: NHS Digital and Office for National Statistics</em></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL5970 more like this
HL5971 more like this
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less than 2018-03-14T16:44:48.14Zmore like thismore than 2018-03-14T16:44:48.14Z
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star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
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star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this
852488
unstar this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-02-28more like thismore than 2018-02-28
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Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
unstar this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Neonatal Mortality more like this
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25277
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star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Tonge more like this
star this property uin HL5971 more like this
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star this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-03-14more like thismore than 2018-03-14
star this property answer text <p><strong><strong>​</strong></strong></p><p>The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.</p><p><em><strong>Letter from John Pullinger CB, National Statistician, to Baroness Tonge, dated 07 March 2018</strong></em></p><p>Dear Baroness Tonge,</p><p>As National Statistician and Chief Executive of the UK Statistics Authority, I am replying to your Parliamentary Questions asking (a) whether the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity has decreased over the past five years (HL5969); (b) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2000–05, (2) 2005–10, and (3) 2010–15 (HL5970); and (c) what was the incidence of neonatal mortality and morbidity in (1) 2014–15, (2) 2015–16, and (3) 2016–17 (HL5971).</p><p>The Office for National Statistics (ONS) is responsible for publishing statistics on deaths registered in England and Wales. Statistics on deaths are normally published using calendar years. Neonatal mortality figures are available for both the year the death was registered and the year the death occurred. Comparisons over time are more meaningful using death occurrences, to allow for delays in registering deaths. The latest year for which death occurrence figures are available is 2015 [see note 1 below]. The neonatal mortality figures for 2016 will be published on 14 March 2018 and the data for 2017 will be published in early 2019.</p><p>Table 1 below provides the number of neonatal deaths and the neonatal mortality rates per 1,000 live births for England and Wales, for each calendar year from 2000 to 2015.</p><p>Because the number of neonatal deaths each year is relatively small, there is likely to be some random fluctuation, and no single year since 2000 shows a statistically significant change from the preceding year. However, there has been a generally downward trend throughout the period. In the five years 2011-15, the lowest neonatal mortality rate was in 2014, and this was significantly lower than in 2011 and all previous years. The rate in 2015 was higher than in 2014, but is still significantly lower than in 2011 (taking into account rounding of the figures to one decimal place).</p><p>NHS Digital is responsible for publishing statistics on NHS patient care in England. There is no widely accepted measure of neonatal morbidity, however trends in the admission of neonates to hospital may be useful information. Therefore, figures based on Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) have been given here.</p><p>Table 2 below provides the number of neonatal finished consultant episodes (FCEs) and corresponding neonatal hospitalisation rate per 1,000 live births for England, for each financial year from 2000-01 to 2016-17, and the five-year periods 2001-02 to 2004-05, 2005-06 to 2009-10, and 2010-11 to 2014-15. Note that HES data include activity ending in the year in question and run from April to March, e.g. 2012-13 includes activity ending between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013.</p><p>Changes to the HES figures over time need to be interpreted in the context of improvements in data quality and coverage (particularly in earlier years), improvements in coverage of independent sector activity (particularly from 2006-07) and changes in NHS practice. For example, apparent reductions in activity may be due to a number of procedures which may now be undertaken in outpatient settings and so no longer include in admitted patient HES data. Conversely, apparent increases in activity may be due to improved recording of diagnosis or procedure information.</p><p>There has been year on year fluctuation in the number and rate of hospital episodes for neonates over the period of interest, but with a clear overall upward trend. The hospitalisation rate in 2015-16 was significantly higher than five years before. However, as noted above, it is likely that the trend is influenced to some extent by factors such as changing clinical practice and recording.</p><p>Yours sincerely,</p><p>John Pullinger</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Note 1:</p><p><a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales" target="_blank">https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/birthsdeathsandmarriages/deaths/datasets/childmortalitystatisticschildhoodinfantandperinatalchildhoodinfantandperinatalmortalityinenglandandwales</a></p><p> </p><p>Table 1: Neonatal deaths occurring in England and Wales, numbers and rates, 2000 to 2015</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal deaths</p></td><td><p>Neonatal mortality rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000</p></td><td><p>2,335</p></td><td><p>3.9</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td><td><p>4.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001</p></td><td><p>2,137</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002</p></td><td><p>2,126</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003</p></td><td><p>2,264</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004</p></td><td><p>2,209</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005</p></td><td><p>2,227</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006</p></td><td><p>2,325</p></td><td><p>3.5</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.6</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007</p></td><td><p>2,248</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.4</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008</p></td><td><p>2,261</p></td><td><p>3.2</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009</p></td><td><p>2,205</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td><td><p>3.0</p></td><td><p>3.3</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>2,123</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>2,135</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>3.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>2,042</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>1,871</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>1,762</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.4</p></td><td><p>2.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015</p></td><td><p>1,838</p></td><td><p>2.6</p></td><td><p>2.5</p></td><td><p>2.8</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal deaths are defined as deaths of live-born infants at less than 28 days</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p> </p><p>Source: Office for National Statistics</p><p> </p><p> </p><p>Table 2: Neonatal hospital episodes occurring in England, numbers and rates, 2000-02 to 2016-17</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Neonatal episodes (FCEs)</p></td><td><p>Neonatal hospitalisation rate</p></td><td><p>Lower confidence limit</p></td><td><p>Upper confidence limit</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01</p></td><td><p>57,983</p></td><td><p>96.3</p></td><td><p>95.5</p></td><td><p>97.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2001-02</p></td><td><p>56,097</p></td><td><p>94.3</p></td><td><p>93.5</p></td><td><p>95.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2002-03</p></td><td><p>58,610</p></td><td><p>97.3</p></td><td><p>96.5</p></td><td><p>98.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2003-04</p></td><td><p>64,574</p></td><td><p>103.1</p></td><td><p>102.4</p></td><td><p>103.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2004-05</p></td><td><p>65,873</p></td><td><p>102.7</p></td><td><p>101.9</p></td><td><p>103.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06</p></td><td><p>69,000</p></td><td><p>105.9</p></td><td><p>105.1</p></td><td><p>106.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2006-07</p></td><td><p>74,893</p></td><td><p>111.0</p></td><td><p>110.2</p></td><td><p>111.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2007-08</p></td><td><p>84,755</p></td><td><p>122.0</p></td><td><p>121.2</p></td><td><p>122.8</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2008-09</p></td><td><p>91,420</p></td><td><p>129.1</p></td><td><p>128.3</p></td><td><p>129.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2009-10</p></td><td><p>96,005</p></td><td><p>135.1</p></td><td><p>134.3</p></td><td><p>136.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11</p></td><td><p>102,847</p></td><td><p>142.2</p></td><td><p>141.3</p></td><td><p>143.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2011-12</p></td><td><p>101,577</p></td><td><p>140.0</p></td><td><p>139.2</p></td><td><p>140.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2012-13</p></td><td><p>106,531</p></td><td><p>147.6</p></td><td><p>146.7</p></td><td><p>148.5</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2013-14</p></td><td><p>109,509</p></td><td><p>157.0</p></td><td><p>156.0</p></td><td><p>157.9</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2014-15</p></td><td><p>114,229</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.2</p></td><td><p>165.1</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2015-16</p></td><td><p>114,420</p></td><td><p>164.1</p></td><td><p>163.1</p></td><td><p>165.0</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2016-17*</p></td><td><p>116,573</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td><td><p>-</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2000-01 to 2004-05†</p></td><td><p>301,700</p></td><td><p>98.4</p></td><td><p>98.0</p></td><td><p>98.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2005-06 to 2009-10†</p></td><td><p>414,060</p></td><td><p>120.4</p></td><td><p>120.0</p></td><td><p>120.7</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>2010-11 to 2014-15†</p></td><td><p>532,149</p></td><td><p>149.3</p></td><td><p>148.9</p></td><td><p>149.7</p></td></tr></tbody></table><ol><li><p><em>Neonatal episodes are defined as counts of patients where there is a finished consultant episode (FCE) for neonates with an extended hospital stay immediately following birth, or an admission within the first 28 days of life. An FCE is a continuous period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FCEs are counted against the year in which they end. Figures do not represent the number of different patients, as a person may have more than one episode of care within the same stay in hospital or in different stays in the same year.</em></p></li><li><p><em>Rates are per 1,000 live births. The number of births per financial year has been estimated based on births in the relevant calendar years.</em></p></li><li><p><em>The 95% lower and upper confidence limits have been provided. These form a confidence interval, which is a measure of the statistical precision of a rate and shows the range of uncertainty around the calculated rate. As a general rule, if the confidence interval around one figure overlaps with the interval around another, we cannot say with certainty that there is more than a chance difference between the two figures.</em></p></li></ol><p><em>* A rate for 2016-17 cannot be calculated as the number of births in 2017 is not yet available.</em></p><p><em>† As a patient may have been in hospital in two consecutive years, the total per five-year grouping will not be equal to a sum of the corresponding five individual years.</em></p><p> </p><p><em>Source: NHS Digital and Office for National Statistics</em></p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
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HL5969 more like this
HL5970 more like this
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star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
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star this property label Biography information for Baroness Tonge more like this