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143442
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-07more like thismore than 2014-11-07
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading World War I: Debts more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government how much they owe the government of the United States as a result of the First World War; and what are the arrangements for repayment. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Laird more like this
star this property uin HL2727 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-20more like thismore than 2014-11-20
star this property answer text <p>At the end of the First World War, the debt owed to the United States by the United Kingdom amounted to around £850 million. Repayments of the debt were made between 1923 and 1931. In 1931, President Hoover of the United States proposed a one year moratorium on all war debts, which allowed extensive international discussions on the general problems of debt repayment to be held. However, no satisfactory agreement was reached. In the absence of such an agreement, no payments have been made to, or received from, other nations since 1934. At the time, the United Kingdom was owed more by other nations than the outstanding principal it owed the United States.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>For this reason, liabilities and assets arising from WW1 have not been listed on the UK government’s balance sheet since 1944-45.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Deighton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-20T17:03:29.643Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-20T17:03:29.643Z
star this property answering member
4262
star this property label Biography information for Lord Deighton more like this
unstar this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
166116
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-25more like thismore than 2014-11-25
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading World War I: Debts more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether any countries owe money to the United Kingdom as a result of the First World War; and if so, which and how much in each case. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Laird more like this
star this property uin HL3174 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-09more like thismore than 2014-12-09
star this property answer text <p>At the end of World War I, debt was owed between the UK and other countries. However, in 1931 President Hoover of the United States proposed a one year moratorium on all War debts, which allowed extensive international discussions on the general problems of debt repayment to be held. No satisfactory agreement was reached. In the absence of such an agreement no payments have been made to, or received from, other nations since 1934.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The most recent repayment made by the UK on its debt to the US from the First World War was made in the financial year 1932-33. More specific information on the date of this payment is not available.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The UK included the First World War debt to the US as part of the National Debt up until 1944-45, however all First World War debts to and from other nations are now effectively considered as having lapsed. Therefore, as explained in the answer to the original question, no arrangements have been made for repayment of the debt.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>In addition, the government holds eight undated gilts in its debt portfolio, three of which stem from bonds originally issued to raise money to finance the First World War.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Chancellor has announced that two of these undated gilts, 4% Consolidated Loan and 3½% War Loan, will be redeemed, on 1 February 2015 and 9 March 2015 respectively. These gilts account for some 99% of the bonds originally issued to finance the First World War. The government has also announced a strategy to remove the remaining undated gilts from the debt portfolio when it is deemed value for money to do so.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The repayments on this debt will go to the holders of these bonds. The Treasury does not hold detailed information on the identity of organisations or individuals who own gilts, however information on sectoral holdings of gilts is published on a quarterly basis by the Office for National Statistics. The latest information on the breakdown of gilt holdings by sector, including a breakdown of non-UK resident holders of gilts by foreign central banks and other non-residents, is published by the ONS in Section 5.2.10 of its quarterly United Kingdom Economic Accounts publication.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Deighton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL3175 more like this
HL3176 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-09T17:41:36.6Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-09T17:41:36.6Z
star this property answering member
4262
star this property label Biography information for Lord Deighton more like this
unstar this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
166117
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-25more like thismore than 2014-11-25
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading World War I: Debts more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Deighton on 20 November (HL2727), concerning debt for the First World War, what are the arrangements for repayment of the United Kingdom's debt to the United States; and why that information was not included in the answer to the original question. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Laird more like this
star this property uin HL3175 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-09more like thismore than 2014-12-09
star this property answer text <p>At the end of World War I, debt was owed between the UK and other countries. However, in 1931 President Hoover of the United States proposed a one year moratorium on all War debts, which allowed extensive international discussions on the general problems of debt repayment to be held. No satisfactory agreement was reached. In the absence of such an agreement no payments have been made to, or received from, other nations since 1934.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The most recent repayment made by the UK on its debt to the US from the First World War was made in the financial year 1932-33. More specific information on the date of this payment is not available.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The UK included the First World War debt to the US as part of the National Debt up until 1944-45, however all First World War debts to and from other nations are now effectively considered as having lapsed. Therefore, as explained in the answer to the original question, no arrangements have been made for repayment of the debt.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>In addition, the government holds eight undated gilts in its debt portfolio, three of which stem from bonds originally issued to raise money to finance the First World War.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Chancellor has announced that two of these undated gilts, 4% Consolidated Loan and 3½% War Loan, will be redeemed, on 1 February 2015 and 9 March 2015 respectively. These gilts account for some 99% of the bonds originally issued to finance the First World War. The government has also announced a strategy to remove the remaining undated gilts from the debt portfolio when it is deemed value for money to do so.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The repayments on this debt will go to the holders of these bonds. The Treasury does not hold detailed information on the identity of organisations or individuals who own gilts, however information on sectoral holdings of gilts is published on a quarterly basis by the Office for National Statistics. The latest information on the breakdown of gilt holdings by sector, including a breakdown of non-UK resident holders of gilts by foreign central banks and other non-residents, is published by the ONS in Section 5.2.10 of its quarterly United Kingdom Economic Accounts publication.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Deighton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL3174 more like this
HL3176 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-09T17:41:36.487Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-09T17:41:36.487Z
star this property answering member
4262
star this property label Biography information for Lord Deighton more like this
unstar this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
166118
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-11-25more like thismore than 2014-11-25
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading World War I: Debts more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Deighton on 20 November (HL2727), concerning debt for the First World War, when was the most recent repayment made to the United States. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Laird more like this
star this property uin HL3176 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-09more like thismore than 2014-12-09
star this property answer text <p>At the end of World War I, debt was owed between the UK and other countries. However, in 1931 President Hoover of the United States proposed a one year moratorium on all War debts, which allowed extensive international discussions on the general problems of debt repayment to be held. No satisfactory agreement was reached. In the absence of such an agreement no payments have been made to, or received from, other nations since 1934.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The most recent repayment made by the UK on its debt to the US from the First World War was made in the financial year 1932-33. More specific information on the date of this payment is not available.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The UK included the First World War debt to the US as part of the National Debt up until 1944-45, however all First World War debts to and from other nations are now effectively considered as having lapsed. Therefore, as explained in the answer to the original question, no arrangements have been made for repayment of the debt.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>In addition, the government holds eight undated gilts in its debt portfolio, three of which stem from bonds originally issued to raise money to finance the First World War.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Chancellor has announced that two of these undated gilts, 4% Consolidated Loan and 3½% War Loan, will be redeemed, on 1 February 2015 and 9 March 2015 respectively. These gilts account for some 99% of the bonds originally issued to finance the First World War. The government has also announced a strategy to remove the remaining undated gilts from the debt portfolio when it is deemed value for money to do so.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The repayments on this debt will go to the holders of these bonds. The Treasury does not hold detailed information on the identity of organisations or individuals who own gilts, however information on sectoral holdings of gilts is published on a quarterly basis by the Office for National Statistics. The latest information on the breakdown of gilt holdings by sector, including a breakdown of non-UK resident holders of gilts by foreign central banks and other non-residents, is published by the ONS in Section 5.2.10 of its quarterly United Kingdom Economic Accounts publication.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Deighton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL3174 more like this
HL3175 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-09T17:41:36.703Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-09T17:41:36.703Z
star this property answering member
4262
star this property label Biography information for Lord Deighton more like this
unstar this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
167908
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2014-12-04more like thismore than 2014-12-04
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading World War I: Debts more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what arrangements they are making to repay outstanding debt from the First World War; and to whom the repayments will be made. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Laird more like this
star this property uin HL3432 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-12-19more like thismore than 2014-12-19
star this property answer text <p>The Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, announced on 3 December that the Government will redeem 3½% War Loan, thus repaying the vast majority of the nation’s First World War debt. The Chancellor also announced that the Government will adopt a strategy to remove the other remaining undated gilts in the government’s debt portfolio, some of which have origins going back to the eighteenth century, where it is deemed value for money to do so.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>This announcement followed the Government’s decision on 31 October to redeem the much smaller 4% Consolidated Loan, the first planned repayment of an undated gilt of this kind by government for 67 years. The Debt Management Office also announced on 17 December that 3½% Conversion Loan would be redeemed on 1 April 2015. After these redemptions, none of the £2.2bn worth of First World War debt currently in the government’s debt portfolio will remain.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The Treasury will redeem the outstanding £1.9 billion of debt from 3½% War Loan on Monday 9 March 2015, and the 4% Consolidated Loan will be redeemed on 1 February 2015.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The repayments on this debt will go to the holders of these bonds. The Treasury does not hold detailed information on the identity of organisations or individuals who own gilts, however information on sectoral holdings of gilts is published on a quarterly basis by the Office for National Statistics. The latest information on the breakdown of gilt holdings by sector, including a breakdown of non-UK resident holders of gilts by foreign central banks and other non-residents, is published by the ONS in Section 5.2.10 of its quarterly United Kingdom Economic Accounts publication.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>We are only able to take this action today thanks to the difficult decisions that this government has taken to get a grip on the public finances. The fact that we will no longer have to pay the relatively high rate of interest on these gilts means that most important of all, this decision represents great value for money for the taxpayer.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Deighton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-12-19T12:45:07.42Zmore like thismore than 2014-12-19T12:45:07.42Z
star this property answering member
4262
star this property label Biography information for Lord Deighton more like this
unstar this property tabling member
2479
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Laird more like this
1110704
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-04-09more like thismore than 2019-04-09
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading World Economy more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of a recent International Monetary Fund forecast regarding the impact of a no-deal Brexit as a risk to global economic growth. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Taylor of Warwick more like this
star this property uin HL15168 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-04-25more like thismore than 2019-04-25
star this property answer text <p>The government has not assessed the International Monetary Fund’s World Economic Outlook April 2019 publication. The IMF is an independent organisation. Their analysis of the UK and global economy represents their own views.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-04-25T10:52:11.123Zmore like thismore than 2019-04-25T10:52:11.123Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
unstar this property tabling member
1796
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Taylor of Warwick more like this
902278
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-05-11more like thismore than 2018-05-11
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading Work Experience more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how many employers have been contacted by HMRC in the past year regarding their advertisement of unpaid internships; whether they will publish a list of those employers; and whether they will publish the correspondence sent by HMRC to such employers. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Mendelsohn more like this
star this property uin HL7804 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-05-23more like thismore than 2018-05-23
star this property answer text <p>The government is determined that everyone who is entitled to the National Minimum and Living Wage (NMW) receives it. Anyone who feels they have been underpaid NMW should contact the Acas helpline on 0300 123 1100 or use the online pay and work rights complaints form on gov.uk. HMRC review all complaints that are referred to them.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC has contacted over 1,000 employers who advertise unpaid internships over the past year, signposting them to NMW guidance to help ensure they are compliant. The names of the employers contacted cannot be divulged for confidentiality reasons, and there are no plans to publish the correspondence sent by HMRC to such employers.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>There are no special rules in respect of interns for NMW purposes, and depending on the arrangements between the parties an intern can either be a worker, a voluntary worker or a volunteer. When HMRC investigate an intern’s entitlement to the NMW the reality of the working relationship is carefully considered.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-05-23T11:40:03.57Zmore like thismore than 2018-05-23T11:40:03.57Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
unstar this property tabling member
4286
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Mendelsohn more like this
178235
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-02-05more like thismore than 2015-02-05
star this property answering body
HM Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading Wines: Exports more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their estimate of the total value of United Kingdom wine exported in each of the last five years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Byford more like this
star this property uin HL4701 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-02-18more like thismore than 2015-02-18
star this property answer text <p>HM Revenue &amp; Customs is responsible for the collection of data on UK imports and exports. From the collected trade data however, we cannot identify exports of UK produced wine.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>The total value of all wine exported from the UK (exports of UK produced wine and exports of wine produced elsewhere) in each of the last five years is:</p><p> </p><table><tbody><tr><td><p>Year</p></td><td><p>Value (£)</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>2010</p></td><td><p>426,546,147</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>2011</p></td><td><p>542,538,414</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>2012</p></td><td><p>443,696,522</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>2013</p></td><td><p>445,606,225</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td><p>2014</p></td><td><p>452,566,271</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="2"><p>Source: HMRC Overseas Trade Statistics</p></td><td> </td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p><strong>Note:</strong></p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>1) 2014 data is subject to update</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>2) Data is for wine, including fortified wine (HS2204 excluding HS2204 30)</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>3) Trade is presented on a General Trade basis</p></td></tr><tr><td colspan="3"><p>4) EU Trade includes Below Threshold Trade Allocations (BTTAs)</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Deighton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-02-18T11:42:25.067Zmore like thismore than 2015-02-18T11:42:25.067Z
star this property answering member
4262
star this property label Biography information for Lord Deighton more like this
unstar this property tabling member
3343
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Byford more like this
935147
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-07-05more like thismore than 2018-07-05
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading Whisky: Exports more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the importance to industries such as the scotch whisky industry of maintaining access to the Excise Movement and Control System. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Browne of Ladyton more like this
star this property uin HL9264 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-07-19more like thismore than 2018-07-19
star this property answer text <p>During the implementation period, the UK will no longer be a Member State of the European Union, but market access will continue on current terms. To give businesses and citizens certainty, common rules will remain in place until the end of the period meaning businesses will be able to trade on the same terms as now up until the end of 2020.</p><p>The UK’s future relationship with the EU is subject to negotiations. The Government has published a White Paper that set out in detail the UK’s position on the future relationship. The Government hopes to see negotiations accelerate and intensify and remains confident of reaching agreement on the Withdrawal Agreement and future customs framework.</p><p>The Government proposes a common approach to the relevant excise processes and procedures that apply to cross border trade in goods. This would, for example, enable businesses that move excise goods, such as alcohol products, tobacco products and oils, within the EU to do so much as they do now.</p><p>In the meantime, the Government is engaging with businesses, including small and medium-sized enterprises, in every sector and region of the UK economy to assess the effect of EU Exit on them. This includes specific engagement in relation to scotch whisky and we continue to engage closely with the Scotch Whisky Association.</p><p>The Taxation (Cross-Border Trade) Bill provides flexibility to allow HMRC to continue to use IT systems, including the Excise Movement and Control System for internal movements of excise goods in duty suspension, subject to the outcome of negotiations.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL9265 more like this
HL9266 more like this
HL9267 more like this
HL9268 more like this
HL9269 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-07-19T15:40:14.797Zmore like thismore than 2018-07-19T15:40:14.797Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
unstar this property tabling member
620
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Browne of Ladyton more like this
935148
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2018-07-05more like thismore than 2018-07-05
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury remove filter
star this property hansard heading Whisky: Exports more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what structures they plan to put in place to ensure that scotch whisky can continue to move to and through the EU freely after March 2019 should access to the Excise Movement and Control System not continue during any Brexit implementation period. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Browne of Ladyton more like this
star this property uin HL9265 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2018-07-19more like thismore than 2018-07-19
star this property answer text <p>During the implementation period, the UK will no longer be a Member State of the European Union, but market access will continue on current terms. To give businesses and citizens certainty, common rules will remain in place until the end of the period meaning businesses will be able to trade on the same terms as now up until the end of 2020.</p><p>The UK’s future relationship with the EU is subject to negotiations. The Government has published a White Paper that set out in detail the UK’s position on the future relationship. The Government hopes to see negotiations accelerate and intensify and remains confident of reaching agreement on the Withdrawal Agreement and future customs framework.</p><p>The Government proposes a common approach to the relevant excise processes and procedures that apply to cross border trade in goods. This would, for example, enable businesses that move excise goods, such as alcohol products, tobacco products and oils, within the EU to do so much as they do now.</p><p>In the meantime, the Government is engaging with businesses, including small and medium-sized enterprises, in every sector and region of the UK economy to assess the effect of EU Exit on them. This includes specific engagement in relation to scotch whisky and we continue to engage closely with the Scotch Whisky Association.</p><p>The Taxation (Cross-Border Trade) Bill provides flexibility to allow HMRC to continue to use IT systems, including the Excise Movement and Control System for internal movements of excise goods in duty suspension, subject to the outcome of negotiations.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Bates more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL9264 more like this
HL9266 more like this
HL9267 more like this
HL9268 more like this
HL9269 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2018-07-19T15:40:14.877Zmore like thismore than 2018-07-19T15:40:14.877Z
star this property answering member
1091
star this property label Biography information for Lord Bates more like this
unstar this property tabling member
620
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Browne of Ladyton more like this