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421268
unstar this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2015-10-14more like thismore than 2015-10-14
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Hypothyroidism more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what steps they have taken to help patients with undiagnosed hypothyroidism who present clinical signs and symptoms of that condition, but are refused any treatment as their blood test results remain normal. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
unstar this property uin HL2639 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-27more like thismore than 2015-10-27
star this property answer text <p>A blood test measuring hormone levels is the only accurate way to find out if there is a thyroid problem.</p><br /><p>Best practice on the identification and management of hypothyroidism has been set out by the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in its guidance, <em>The Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hypothyroidism</em>, first published in 2008. The guidance, which is attached, was developed on behalf of key organisations, including the British Thyroid Association (BTA), the British Thyroid Foundation (BTF) and the Society for Endocrinology (SOE), and is endorsed by the Royal College of General Practitioners. A copy of the UK Guidelines is attached.</p><br /><p>The RCP guidance sets out that the only validated method of testing thyroid function is through a blood sample, which must include measurement of the levels of thyroid‐stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) in serum, as recommended in the <em>UK Guidelines for the Use of Thyroid Function Tests</em> published by the BTA.</p><br /><p>The RCP guidelines set out that overwhelming evidence supports the use of thyroxine hormone replacement (T4 or tetra-iodothyronine) alone in the treatment of hypothyroidism, with this usually being prescribed as levothyroxine. However, this does not prevent clinicians considering other forms of thyroid hormone replacement if appropriate.</p><p>The guidance remains up-to-date and a statement from the BTA Executive Committee supporting the existing guidelines was published in May 2015 in <em>Clinical Endocrinology</em> and endorsed by the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, the BTF, the RCP and the SOE. The full statement is attached and available online at:</p><br /><p><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12824/full" target="_blank">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12824/full</a></p><br /><p>Regarding international guidance and harmonisation on approaches to testing, the existing United Kingdom guidelines have now been supported by new guidance published in the United States of America which draws on the latest research and available evidence on the management of the condition. The USA guidance also includes a section on the ethics of prescribing thyroid hormone combination therapies when the potential long-term harmful effects are not known.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Okosieme_et_al-2015-Clinical_Endocrinology.pdf more like this
star this property title Clinical Endocrinology paper more like this
2
star this property file name the-diagnosis-and-management-of-primary-hypothyroidism-revised-statement-14-june-2011_2.pdf more like this
star this property title Royal College of Physicians guidance more like this
3
star this property file name TFT_guideline_final_version_July_2006.pdf more like this
star this property title UK Guidelines Thyroid Function Tests more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2640 remove filter
HL2641 more like this
HL2642 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-27T17:53:42.837Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-27T17:53:42.837Z
star this property answering member
127
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
star this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
421270
unstar this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2015-10-14more like thismore than 2015-10-14
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Hypothyroidism more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government what progress is being made on the initiative to achieve greater harmonisation on approaches to diagnosing hypothyroidism internationally. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
unstar this property uin HL2641 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-27more like thismore than 2015-10-27
star this property answer text <p>A blood test measuring hormone levels is the only accurate way to find out if there is a thyroid problem.</p><br /><p>Best practice on the identification and management of hypothyroidism has been set out by the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in its guidance, <em>The Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hypothyroidism</em>, first published in 2008. The guidance, which is attached, was developed on behalf of key organisations, including the British Thyroid Association (BTA), the British Thyroid Foundation (BTF) and the Society for Endocrinology (SOE), and is endorsed by the Royal College of General Practitioners. A copy of the UK Guidelines is attached.</p><br /><p>The RCP guidance sets out that the only validated method of testing thyroid function is through a blood sample, which must include measurement of the levels of thyroid‐stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) in serum, as recommended in the <em>UK Guidelines for the Use of Thyroid Function Tests</em> published by the BTA.</p><br /><p>The RCP guidelines set out that overwhelming evidence supports the use of thyroxine hormone replacement (T4 or tetra-iodothyronine) alone in the treatment of hypothyroidism, with this usually being prescribed as levothyroxine. However, this does not prevent clinicians considering other forms of thyroid hormone replacement if appropriate.</p><p>The guidance remains up-to-date and a statement from the BTA Executive Committee supporting the existing guidelines was published in May 2015 in <em>Clinical Endocrinology</em> and endorsed by the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, the BTF, the RCP and the SOE. The full statement is attached and available online at:</p><br /><p><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12824/full" target="_blank">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12824/full</a></p><br /><p>Regarding international guidance and harmonisation on approaches to testing, the existing United Kingdom guidelines have now been supported by new guidance published in the United States of America which draws on the latest research and available evidence on the management of the condition. The USA guidance also includes a section on the ethics of prescribing thyroid hormone combination therapies when the potential long-term harmful effects are not known.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Okosieme_et_al-2015-Clinical_Endocrinology.pdf more like this
star this property title Clinical Endocrinology paper more like this
2
star this property file name the-diagnosis-and-management-of-primary-hypothyroidism-revised-statement-14-june-2011_2.pdf more like this
star this property title Royal College of Physicians guidance more like this
3
star this property file name TFT_guideline_final_version_July_2006.pdf more like this
star this property title UK Guidelines Thyroid Function Tests more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2639 more like this
HL2640 remove filter
HL2642 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-27T17:53:43.017Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-27T17:53:43.017Z
star this property answering member
127
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
star this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
421271
unstar this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2015-10-14more like thismore than 2015-10-14
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Hypothyroidism more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether there are any plans to amend the treatment of hypothyroidism by including thyroid hormone combination therapies other than treatment by levothyroxine in the standard of care. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pendry more like this
unstar this property uin HL2642 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-10-27more like thismore than 2015-10-27
star this property answer text <p>A blood test measuring hormone levels is the only accurate way to find out if there is a thyroid problem.</p><br /><p>Best practice on the identification and management of hypothyroidism has been set out by the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) in its guidance, <em>The Diagnosis and Management of Primary Hypothyroidism</em>, first published in 2008. The guidance, which is attached, was developed on behalf of key organisations, including the British Thyroid Association (BTA), the British Thyroid Foundation (BTF) and the Society for Endocrinology (SOE), and is endorsed by the Royal College of General Practitioners. A copy of the UK Guidelines is attached.</p><br /><p>The RCP guidance sets out that the only validated method of testing thyroid function is through a blood sample, which must include measurement of the levels of thyroid‐stimulating hormone (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) in serum, as recommended in the <em>UK Guidelines for the Use of Thyroid Function Tests</em> published by the BTA.</p><br /><p>The RCP guidelines set out that overwhelming evidence supports the use of thyroxine hormone replacement (T4 or tetra-iodothyronine) alone in the treatment of hypothyroidism, with this usually being prescribed as levothyroxine. However, this does not prevent clinicians considering other forms of thyroid hormone replacement if appropriate.</p><p>The guidance remains up-to-date and a statement from the BTA Executive Committee supporting the existing guidelines was published in May 2015 in <em>Clinical Endocrinology</em> and endorsed by the Association for Clinical Biochemistry and Laboratory Medicine, the BTF, the RCP and the SOE. The full statement is attached and available online at:</p><br /><p><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12824/full" target="_blank">http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cen.12824/full</a></p><br /><p>Regarding international guidance and harmonisation on approaches to testing, the existing United Kingdom guidelines have now been supported by new guidance published in the United States of America which draws on the latest research and available evidence on the management of the condition. The USA guidance also includes a section on the ethics of prescribing thyroid hormone combination therapies when the potential long-term harmful effects are not known.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property attachment
1
star this property file name Okosieme_et_al-2015-Clinical_Endocrinology.pdf more like this
star this property title Clinical Endocrinology paper more like this
2
star this property file name the-diagnosis-and-management-of-primary-hypothyroidism-revised-statement-14-june-2011_2.pdf more like this
star this property title Royal College of Physicians guidance more like this
3
star this property file name TFT_guideline_final_version_July_2006.pdf more like this
star this property title UK Guidelines Thyroid Function Tests more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL2639 more like this
HL2640 remove filter
HL2641 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-10-27T17:53:43.093Zmore like thismore than 2015-10-27T17:53:43.093Z
star this property answering member
127
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
457
star this property label Biography information for Lord Pendry more like this
114517
unstar this property registered interest false remove filter
star this property date less than 2014-11-05more like thismore than 2014-11-05
star this property answering body
Department of Health more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health more like this
star this property hansard heading Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty’s Government, further to the Written Answer by the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Public Health, Jane Ellison, on 12 September (HC Deb, col 750W), whether data regarding the cohort of patients that may develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome as described in the journals Human Fertility (volume 10, issue 3, pages 183–7) or Fertility and Sterility (volume 101, issue 4, pages 967–973) were shared with the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA); and what assessment the HFEA has made of those studies. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this
unstar this property uin HL2690 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2014-11-18more like thismore than 2014-11-18
star this property answer text <p>The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) has advised that, with regard to the Human Fertility journal article, it has nothing to add to the answers given to the noble Lord on 22 October 2008 (Official Report WA110), 9 July 2012 (Official Report, cols. WA 202-3) and 8 January 2013 (WA23). Data regarding the cohort of patients described in Fertility and Sterility (volume 101, issue 4, pages 967–973) were not shared with the HFEA. However, the HFEA has access to the published article.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>It would be for clinicians and professional bodies to decide on the evidence required to predict the cohort of patients that may develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome and to treat symptoms in accordance with guidelines.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p>As outlined in the answer given on 23 Jan 2013 (Official Report WA217), the HFEA would refer to evidence based guidelines, produced by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence, on these matters.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Earl Howe more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL2640 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2014-11-18T12:39:40.517Zmore like thismore than 2014-11-18T12:39:40.517Z
star this property answering member
2000
unstar this property label Biography information for Earl Howe more like this
star this property tabling member
738
star this property label Biography information for Lord Alton of Liverpool more like this