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782453
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept id 88 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Attorney General more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Attorney General more like this
star this property hansard heading Hate Crime: Prosecutions more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government under what authority the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) has agreed a definition of racially and religiously aggravated crime that is wider than the legal definition under the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and Criminal Justice Act 2003, as indicated in the CPS Public statement on prosecuting racist and religious hate crime published in August. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Vinson more like this
star this property uin HL2876 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction true more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-16more like thismore than 2017-11-16
star this property answer text <p>In order to charge and prosecute hate crimes, the CPS uses the legal definition provided by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998 and Criminal Justice Act 2003. The shared police and CPS definition of hate crime is based on the perception of the victim or any other person and allows for case flagging and monitoring as well as appropriate victim support, it does not affect the charge.</p><p>This flagging definition comes from the recommended definition in the Macpherson report which was published in 1999 as a result of the inquiry into the murder of Stephen Lawrence. The Macpherson Report found a lack of confidence within communities that hate crime was being treated seriously by the police and Criminal Justice System and recommended that the definition of a racist incident should be, ‘any incident which is perceived to be racist by the victim or any other person’. Putting the victim’s perception at the heart of the definition gives a clear signal that, once flagged as a hate crime, an appropriate investigation will follow and evidence to support the law on hostility will be proactively sought. The definition seeks to encourage victims to report and to increase confidence in the Criminal Justice System.</p>
star this property answering member printed Baroness Vere of Norbiton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-16T16:44:23.703Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-16T16:44:23.703Z
star this property question first ministerially corrected
less than 2017-11-20T11:19:23.603Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-20T11:19:23.603Z
star this property answering member
4580
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Vere of Norbiton more like this
star this property previous answer version
22806
star this property answering member printed Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property answering member
4538
star this property label Biography information for Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property tabling member
1807
star this property label Biography information for Lord Vinson more like this
782441
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Leader of the House of Lords more like this
star this property answering dept id 92 more like this
star this property answering dept short name
star this property answering dept sort name Leader of the House of Lords more like this
star this property hansard heading Questions for Short Debate more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask the Leader of the House whether she intends to review the rule under which Members who ask a question for short debate have no right of reply at the end. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Pearson of Rannoch more like this
star this property uin HL2864 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-07more like thismore than 2017-11-07
star this property answer text <p>Questions for short debate, which remain the principal means by which backbenchers are able to secure 1-1½ hour debates in the Chamber or Grand Committee, are, by design, treated as questions rather than motions. As such there is no right of reply.* Standing Order 32(2) is also clear in that members may only speak once to questions for short debate, save, with the leave of the House, to clarify a point they have made in their speech.</p><p>The speaking time limits for additional backbench contributors in the twenty-five questions for short debate we have had so far in this session have ranged from two to ten minutes. Any change to the present arrangements would of course be a matter for the Procedure Committee. I can only note that revising the procedure so that the member asking the question had a right of reply within the 1 or 1½ hour time limit would reduce the time available to other members when debates are well-subscribed.</p><p><br>*Paragraph 6.32 of The Companion to the Standing Orders and Guide to the Proceedings of the House of Lords.</p>
star this property answering member printed Baroness Evans of Bowes Park more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-07T12:00:57.09Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-07T12:00:57.09Z
star this property answering member
4329
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Evans of Bowes Park more like this
star this property tabling member
3153
star this property label Biography information for Lord Pearson of Rannoch more like this
782449
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Schools: Governing Bodies more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their policy on whether school governors should be paid. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Storey more like this
star this property uin HL2872 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-16more like thismore than 2017-11-16
star this property answer text <p>The Government strongly supports the principle that being a school governor should be a voluntary activity. There is currently a prohibition against payments to governors of maintained schools and payments can only be made to academy trustees in very limited circumstances and subject to approval by the Charity Commission.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-16T12:08:47.633Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-16T12:08:47.633Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4238
star this property label Biography information for Lord Storey more like this
782450
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Academies: Pay more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is a cap on the amount of money that can be paid to the chief executive of a multi-academy trust. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Storey more like this
star this property uin HL2873 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-16more like thismore than 2017-11-16
star this property answer text <p>It is essential that we have the best people to lead our schools if we are to raise standards. The responsibilities of school leaders have changed significantly in recent years, with many now running several academies in a multi-academy trust (MAT).</p><p> </p><p>Academy trusts are free to set their own salaries for staff and we would expect this to reflect the size and complexity of the trust, as they must deliver value for money.</p><p> </p><p>The 2017 Academies Financial Handbook, a copy of which I have placed in the House Library, emphasises that decisions about levels of executive pay must follow a robust evidence-based process and are reflective of the individual’s role and responsibilities.</p><p> </p><p>Trusts must disclose senior staff pay annually in their audited accounts. The academies’ sector annual report and accounts we have published means there is now more information available than ever about academy trusts’ finances. The Education and Skills Funding Agency follow up where non-compliance is identified. Disclosure must include: the number of employees earning more than £60k, set out in £10k bands; names of all trustees who received remuneration in each band, and the amounts they received. This will consist of the salaries of the principal in a single academy trust and the chief executive in a MAT, unless in the exceptional case they have chosen not to be a trustee.</p><p> </p><p>Payments by academy trusts to their trustees must be disclosed in the trust’s annual accounts. These are independently audited and published for transparency. The disclosures will comprise payments to those staff who are also trustees, paid in their capacity as staff not as trustees. In addition, Charity Commission approval would be required if an academy trust wished to pay an individual for acting as trustee.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL2874 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-16T12:08:16.41Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-16T12:08:16.41Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4238
star this property label Biography information for Lord Storey more like this
782451
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Academies: Pay more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how many current trustees of multi-academy trusts are paid; and whether there is a cap on the amount they can be paid. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Storey more like this
star this property uin HL2874 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-16more like thismore than 2017-11-16
star this property answer text <p>It is essential that we have the best people to lead our schools if we are to raise standards. The responsibilities of school leaders have changed significantly in recent years, with many now running several academies in a multi-academy trust (MAT).</p><p> </p><p>Academy trusts are free to set their own salaries for staff and we would expect this to reflect the size and complexity of the trust, as they must deliver value for money.</p><p> </p><p>The 2017 Academies Financial Handbook, a copy of which I have placed in the House Library, emphasises that decisions about levels of executive pay must follow a robust evidence-based process and are reflective of the individual’s role and responsibilities.</p><p> </p><p>Trusts must disclose senior staff pay annually in their audited accounts. The academies’ sector annual report and accounts we have published means there is now more information available than ever about academy trusts’ finances. The Education and Skills Funding Agency follow up where non-compliance is identified. Disclosure must include: the number of employees earning more than £60k, set out in £10k bands; names of all trustees who received remuneration in each band, and the amounts they received. This will consist of the salaries of the principal in a single academy trust and the chief executive in a MAT, unless in the exceptional case they have chosen not to be a trustee.</p><p> </p><p>Payments by academy trusts to their trustees must be disclosed in the trust’s annual accounts. These are independently audited and published for transparency. The disclosures will comprise payments to those staff who are also trustees, paid in their capacity as staff not as trustees. In addition, Charity Commission approval would be required if an academy trust wished to pay an individual for acting as trustee.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL2873 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-16T12:08:16.477Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-16T12:08:16.477Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4238
star this property label Biography information for Lord Storey more like this
782452
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Education more like this
star this property answering dept id 60 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Education more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Education more like this
star this property hansard heading Academies more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the difference between (1) a multi-academy trust with only one school, and (2) an academy. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Storey more like this
star this property uin HL2875 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-16more like thismore than 2017-11-16
star this property answer text <p>A multi-academy trust (MAT) is an independent charitable company that is set up to run more than one academy. A MAT may be set up with one academy initially, with the intention of identifying other schools to join the trust later. An “academy” is a school or educational institution established under academy arrangements, as per the Academies Act 2010.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-16T12:06:21.42Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-16T12:06:21.42Z
star this property answering member
4689
star this property label Biography information for Lord Agnew of Oulton more like this
star this property tabling member
4238
star this property label Biography information for Lord Storey more like this
782428
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Alternatives to Prison: Mothers more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of promoting the use of community-based sentences as a first option for offences that presently require custodial sentences, in order to ensure that mothers are not separated from their children. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill more like this
star this property uin HL2851 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-20more like thismore than 2017-11-20
star this property answer text <p>It is important that there are robust community options available to sentencers so that vulnerable women with complex needs, including those with children, are only sent to prison when it is absolutely necessary.</p><p>We are developing a strategy for female offenders to improve outcomes for women in custody and in the community. As part of this work we are already investing £1 million seed funding between 2016 and 2020 to help local areas develop improved, multi-agency approaches to support female offenders in their area.</p><p>Sentences in individual cases are decided by the courts, who take into account guidelines issued by the independent Sentencing Council.</p><p>In February 2017, the Council issued its guideline “Imposition of Community and Custodial and Sentences”, which makes it clear that prison should be reserved for the most serious offences, and that custody should not be imposed where a community order could provide sufficient restriction on an offender’s liberty (by way of punishment) while addressing the rehabilitation of the offender to prevent future crime. The guideline also notes that for offenders on the cusp of custody, imprisonment should not be imposed where there would be an impact on dependants which would make a custodial sentence disproportionate to achieving the aims of sentencing.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-20T11:29:56.397Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-20T11:29:56.397Z
star this property answering member
4538
star this property label Biography information for Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property tabling member
4179
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill more like this
782429
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property hansard heading Prisoners: Mothers more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultations they have conducted in preparation for their strategy on female offenders to ensure that the criminal justice system creates an environment which promotes the reunification of imprisoned mothers with their children; and what assessment they have made of the impact, both short and long term, of such imprisonment on children living in care. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill more like this
star this property uin HL2852 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-16more like thismore than 2017-11-16
star this property answer text <p>We are developing the Female Offender Strategy in consultation with a wide range of stakeholders. We issued a Call for Evidence in March 2017 and regularly consult with key stakeholders through our Advisory Board on Female Offenders, which is chaired by the Minister with responsibility for female offenders. The Minister has met with a number of organisations to discuss a wide range of issues pertinent to female offenders, including the imprisonment of mothers and the impact on their children.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Education has not made any formal assessment of the impact of parental imprisonment in children living in care, but the Government has funded a contract worth over £1.4m for Barnardo’s to operate the i-HOP service – an England wide one-stop information service for all professionals who come into contact with the children and families of offenders – to share evidence on practice and advise commissioners and practitioners on the options available to support the families of offenders.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-16T16:10:49.083Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-16T16:10:49.083Z
star this property answering member
4538
star this property label Biography information for Lord Keen of Elie more like this
star this property tabling member
4179
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Healy of Primrose Hill more like this
782432
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Brexit more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government how many new civil service posts have been created to date to deal with new functions and obligations arising from Brexit; what is the annual cost of those appointments; in which departments those personnel are employed; and what specialist roles are being filled. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Kinnock more like this
star this property uin HL2855 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-15more like thismore than 2017-11-15
star this property answer text <p>The whole of Government is preparing for the UK to make an orderly and successful exit from the European Union, and we are equipping ourselves with the right people and the right skills across Government to make this happen. Whilst workforce planning is primarily the responsibility of each department to determine based on their individual operational and policy requirements, the Civil Service constantly reviews its capabilities in order to deliver the Government’s commitment to leave the EU and get the very best deal for the UK. Civil Service HR is working closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union to support departments, functions and professions in continuing to develop plans to address their emerging capacity and capability requirements.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL2857 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-15T17:55:13.447Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-15T17:55:13.447Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
693
star this property label Biography information for Lord Kinnock more like this
782434
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Brexit more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by the Secretary of State for Exiting the EU to the House of Lords EU Select Committee on 31 October, what estimate they have made of the annual cost of recruiting 8,000 new civil servants to deal with the changes and obligations that they anticipate will arise because of Brexit; which departments will require the new staff; and what specialist roles will be filled. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Kinnock more like this
star this property uin HL2857 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-11-15more like thismore than 2017-11-15
star this property answer text <p>The whole of Government is preparing for the UK to make an orderly and successful exit from the European Union, and we are equipping ourselves with the right people and the right skills across Government to make this happen. Whilst workforce planning is primarily the responsibility of each department to determine based on their individual operational and policy requirements, the Civil Service constantly reviews its capabilities in order to deliver the Government’s commitment to leave the EU and get the very best deal for the UK. Civil Service HR is working closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union to support departments, functions and professions in continuing to develop plans to address their emerging capacity and capability requirements.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL2855 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-11-15T17:55:13.39Zmore like thismore than 2017-11-15T17:55:13.39Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
693
star this property label Biography information for Lord Kinnock more like this