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753266
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-07-18more like thismore than 2017-07-18
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of (1) children, (2) adults, and (3) working families, living in poverty across the United Kingdom; and what long-term plan they have to prevent such poverty. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Bird more like this
star this property uin HL954 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-07-28more like thismore than 2017-07-28
star this property answer text <p>The most commonly used measure of poverty is relative low income.</p><p> </p><p>The latest statistics from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data series show that there are: 2.7 million children, 5.7 million working-age adults, and 2.1 million pensioners in relative low income in the United Kingdom on a ‘before housing costs’ (BHC) basis.</p><p>Analysis of the HBAI data shows that there are 2.1 million families in relative low income BHC where at least one adult member works at least part-time.</p><p>This Government is committed to tackling the root causes of poverty, thereby preventing the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.</p><p> </p><p>This is why we repealed the income-related targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 and replaced them with statutory measures that drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children, now and in the future.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Work and Pensions published Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families in April 2017. Here we set out further non-statutory indicators on a wider set of parental disadvantage and children’s outcomes, which will drive collective action on areas that matter in tackling disadvantage.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL955 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-07-28T10:40:12.077Zmore like thismore than 2017-07-28T10:40:12.077Z
star this property answering member
3349
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property tabling member
4564
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Bird more like this
753267
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-07-18more like thismore than 2017-07-18
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government, further to the remarks by Baroness Buscombe on 13 July (HL Deb, cols 1296–98), what emphasis they place on the prevention of poverty; and how they are working to ensure that the prevention of poverty is prioritised by every Department. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Bird more like this
star this property uin HL955 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-07-28more like thismore than 2017-07-28
star this property answer text <p>The most commonly used measure of poverty is relative low income.</p><p> </p><p>The latest statistics from the Households Below Average Income (HBAI) data series show that there are: 2.7 million children, 5.7 million working-age adults, and 2.1 million pensioners in relative low income in the United Kingdom on a ‘before housing costs’ (BHC) basis.</p><p>Analysis of the HBAI data shows that there are 2.1 million families in relative low income BHC where at least one adult member works at least part-time.</p><p>This Government is committed to tackling the root causes of poverty, thereby preventing the intergenerational cycle of disadvantage.</p><p> </p><p>This is why we repealed the income-related targets set out in the Child Poverty Act 2010 and replaced them with statutory measures that drive action on parental worklessness and children’s educational attainment – the two areas that we know can make the biggest difference to disadvantaged children, now and in the future.</p><p> </p><p>The Department for Work and Pensions published Improving Lives: Helping Workless Families in April 2017. Here we set out further non-statutory indicators on a wider set of parental disadvantage and children’s outcomes, which will drive collective action on areas that matter in tackling disadvantage.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member printed Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL954 more like this
star this property question first answered
remove maximum value filtermore like thismore than 2017-07-28T10:40:12.14Z
star this property answering member
3349
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property tabling member
4564
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Bird more like this
731086
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-06-21more like thismore than 2017-06-21
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government how they have ensured since the 2015 general election that Special Advisers employed in 10 Downing Street do not do anything which is inconsistent with their obligations under the Civil Service Code and Code of Conduct of Special Advisers or behave in a way which is inconsistent with standards set by their employing department. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
star this property uin HL94 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-06-29more like thismore than 2017-06-29
star this property answer text <p>The standards of conduct expected of all civil servants, including Special Advisers are set out in the relevant Codes of Conduct. These Codes make clear what Special Advisers can and cannot do in their roles.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL95 more like this
HL97 more like this
HL99 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.087Zmore like thismore than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.087Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2024
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
731087
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-06-21more like thismore than 2017-06-21
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government how they have ensured that Special Advisers employed in 10 Downing Street behave in a way which is professional and which deserves and retains the confidence of all those with whom they have dealings. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
star this property uin HL95 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-06-29more like thismore than 2017-06-29
star this property answer text <p>The standards of conduct expected of all civil servants, including Special Advisers are set out in the relevant Codes of Conduct. These Codes make clear what Special Advisers can and cannot do in their roles.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL94 more like this
HL97 more like this
HL99 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.167Zmore like thismore than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.167Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2024
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
731089
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-06-21more like thismore than 2017-06-21
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government whether the Civil Service Code and Code of Conduct for Special Advisers permits Special Advisers to restrict access by senior civil servants to the Prime Minister. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
star this property uin HL97 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-06-29more like thismore than 2017-06-29
star this property answer text <p>The standards of conduct expected of all civil servants, including Special Advisers are set out in the relevant Codes of Conduct. These Codes make clear what Special Advisers can and cannot do in their roles.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL94 more like this
HL95 more like this
HL99 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.227Zmore like thismore than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.227Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2024
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
731091
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-06-21more like thismore than 2017-06-21
star this property answering body
Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 53 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Cabinet Office more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government whether they have any evidence that any Special Advisers employed in 10 Downing Street unduly influenced the appointment, removal and replacement of civil servants in breach of the Code of Conduct of Special Advisers. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
star this property uin HL99 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-06-29more like thismore than 2017-06-29
star this property answer text <p>The standards of conduct expected of all civil servants, including Special Advisers are set out in the relevant Codes of Conduct. These Codes make clear what Special Advisers can and cannot do in their roles.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
HL94 more like this
HL95 more like this
HL97 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.29Zmore like thismore than 2017-06-29T16:26:34.29Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
2024
unstar this property label Biography information for Lord Hunt of Kings Heath more like this
752470
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-07-17more like thismore than 2017-07-17
star this property answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept id 201 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government whether they are planning to extend the remit of the Grocery Code Adjudicator to cover the dairy sector. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness McIntosh of Pickering more like this
star this property uin HL916 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-07-27more like thismore than 2017-07-27
star this property answer text <p>The Government published the statutory review of the Grocery Code Adjudicator on 19 July. This review considered the Grocery Code Adjudicator’s performance within the current remit.</p><p> </p><p>The Government separately launched a Call for Evidence to consider whether the remit should be extended. The Government is considering the evidence submitted through the Call for Evidence including considering the position of indirect suppliers within the dairy sector. The Government will respond in due course.</p><p> </p><p>The Grocery Code Adjudicator can already investigate suspected breaches of the Code. It has published statutory guidance on how it will carry out investigation and enforcement functions on GOV.UK (<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/511676/GCA_Statutory_Guidance_updated_March_2016.pdf" target="_blank">GCA Statutory Guidance on Enforcement and Investigations</a>).</p><p> </p><p>The review decided that the maximum level of fines the Grocery Code Adjudicator could impose would not be amended at this time.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL917 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-07-27T13:31:33.023Zmore like thismore than 2017-07-27T13:31:33.023Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
384
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness McIntosh of Pickering more like this
752471
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-07-17more like thismore than 2017-07-17
star this property answering body
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept id 201 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government when they expect to publish the results of their review into the role and remit of the Grocery Code Adjudicator; and whether the Adjudicator will have powers to (1) investigate alleged breaches of the Code on her own initiative, and (2) increase the level of fines in the event of a breach of the Code. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness McIntosh of Pickering more like this
star this property uin HL917 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-07-27more like thismore than 2017-07-27
star this property answer text <p>The Government published the statutory review of the Grocery Code Adjudicator on 19 July. This review considered the Grocery Code Adjudicator’s performance within the current remit.</p><p> </p><p>The Government separately launched a Call for Evidence to consider whether the remit should be extended. The Government is considering the evidence submitted through the Call for Evidence including considering the position of indirect suppliers within the dairy sector. The Government will respond in due course.</p><p> </p><p>The Grocery Code Adjudicator can already investigate suspected breaches of the Code. It has published statutory guidance on how it will carry out investigation and enforcement functions on GOV.UK (<a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/511676/GCA_Statutory_Guidance_updated_March_2016.pdf" target="_blank">GCA Statutory Guidance on Enforcement and Investigations</a>).</p><p> </p><p>The review decided that the maximum level of fines the Grocery Code Adjudicator could impose would not be amended at this time.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL916 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-07-27T13:31:33.15Zmore like thismore than 2017-07-27T13:31:33.15Z
star this property answering member
127
star this property label Biography information for Lord Prior of Brampton more like this
star this property tabling member
384
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness McIntosh of Pickering more like this
752464
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-07-17more like thismore than 2017-07-17
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government, in the light of the findings by Citizens Advice in its report Delivering Universal Credit, what steps they plan to take to reduce the time taken for the first payment of universal credit to be made. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Lister of Burtersett more like this
star this property uin HL910 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-07-25more like thismore than 2017-07-25
star this property answer text <p><em> </em></p><p>The assessment period and payment structure of Universal Credit creates a fixed period between date of entitlement and the first payment.</p><p> </p><p>The policy intention is that claimants receive the first payment 5 weeks after their date of entitlement (6 weeks if waiting days are served). The assessment period runs for a full calendar month from the date of entitlement, and the UC pay date will be 7 calendar days after the end of the assessment period. This mirrors the world of work and allows for a 1 month period in which to gather information about a claimants’ earnings. Advances and budgeting support are available to support claimants during this period. Advances can provide up to 50% of a claimants indicative award straight away.</p><p> </p><p>The latest internal data, for week ending 19 June, suggests some 80% of cases were paid in full at the end of the first assessment period. For the 20% of cases who were not paid in full we estimate around a third have not signed up to their claimant commitment so cannot be paid until they have. The other two thirds have an outstanding verification issue, such as providing bank statements, evidence of childcare costs, or proof of rent. Many of these claimants receive a part-payment where elements of the claim have been verified.</p>
star this property answering member printed Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL911 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-07-25T10:29:55.917Zmore like thismore than 2017-07-25T10:29:55.917Z
star this property answering member
3349
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property tabling member
4234
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Lister of Burtersett more like this
752465
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-07-17more like thismore than 2017-07-17
star this property answering body
Department for Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept id 29 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Work and Pensions more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text Her Majesty's Government how many claimants of universal credit have had to wait for more than six weeks for the first payment of universal credit; and what is the average waiting time. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Lister of Burtersett more like this
star this property uin HL911 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2017-07-25more like thismore than 2017-07-25
star this property answer text <p><em> </em></p><p>The assessment period and payment structure of Universal Credit creates a fixed period between date of entitlement and the first payment.</p><p> </p><p>The policy intention is that claimants receive the first payment 5 weeks after their date of entitlement (6 weeks if waiting days are served). The assessment period runs for a full calendar month from the date of entitlement, and the UC pay date will be 7 calendar days after the end of the assessment period. This mirrors the world of work and allows for a 1 month period in which to gather information about a claimants’ earnings. Advances and budgeting support are available to support claimants during this period. Advances can provide up to 50% of a claimants indicative award straight away.</p><p> </p><p>The latest internal data, for week ending 19 June, suggests some 80% of cases were paid in full at the end of the first assessment period. For the 20% of cases who were not paid in full we estimate around a third have not signed up to their claimant commitment so cannot be paid until they have. The other two thirds have an outstanding verification issue, such as providing bank statements, evidence of childcare costs, or proof of rent. Many of these claimants receive a part-payment where elements of the claim have been verified.</p>
star this property answering member printed Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property grouped question UIN HL910 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-07-25T10:29:56Zmore like thismore than 2017-07-25T10:29:56Z
star this property answering member
3349
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Buscombe more like this
star this property tabling member
4234
unstar this property label Biography information for Baroness Lister of Burtersett more like this