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1050386
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Ministry of Justice more like this
star this property answering dept id 54 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Justice more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Justice more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many responses the Law Commission received from existing leaseholders to the consultation entitled, Leasehold home ownership: buying your freehold or extending your lease, published in September 2018. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Garston and Halewood more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Maria Eagle more like this
star this property uin 213957 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-05more like thismore than 2019-02-05
star this property answer text <p>The Commission received over 1,100 responses to the consultation on enfranchisement reform.</p><p>These responses are from a wide range of interested stakeholders including lawyers, surveyors, leaseholders, landlords, and representative groups.</p><p>The Commission has not yet categorised the 1,100 consultation responses to enable them to identify how many responses are from leaseholders. The Commission’s initial estimate is that around three-quarters of responses are from leaseholders. <br> <br>It is Law Commission policy to publish a full analysis of consultation responses for all its projects, so this information will be published in due course.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South East Cambridgeshire more like this
star this property answering member printed Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-05T12:17:50.063Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-05T12:17:50.063Z
star this property answering member
4517
star this property label Biography information for Lucy Frazer more like this
star this property tabling member
483
unstar this property label Biography information for Maria Eagle more like this
1050402
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading 101 Calls: Fees and Charges more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the revenue accrued as a result of the 15 pence per minute charge for a 101 telephone call is retained by his Department. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Portsmouth South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Stephen Morgan more like this
star this property uin 214051 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-06more like thismore than 2019-02-06
star this property answer text <p>The Home Office does not make any money from calls to the 101 Single Non-Emergency Number, nor do police forces. The 15 pence call charge goes directly to telecom service providers and covers the cost of handling calls and routing them to their destination. Calls to 101 cost 15 pence from mobile devices and landlines, regardless of duration, but are free from payphones.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Nick Hurd more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-06T17:39:49.86Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-06T17:39:49.86Z
star this property answering member
1561
star this property label Biography information for Mr Nick Hurd more like this
star this property tabling member
4653
unstar this property label Biography information for Stephen Morgan more like this
1050403
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading 101 Calls: Fees and Charges more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect of the 15 pence per minute 101 call charge on the finances of lower-income families. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Portsmouth South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Stephen Morgan more like this
star this property uin 214052 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-06more like thismore than 2019-02-06
star this property answer text <p>There is no obligation on telecom service providers to supply the 101 service free of charge as is the case with 999 under the 2003 Communications Act. Calls to 101 cost 15 pence from mobile devices and landlines, regardless of duration, but are free from payphones.</p><p>The public have always paid to contact the police by telephone for non-emergencies and the 15p charge per call is a transparent rate. Police non-emergency numbers (such as 0845 numbers) which were used before 2011 could cost members of the public up to 40p per minute. While it may not be an option for everyone, the public can also report non-emergency crimes online via forces’ websites at a time that is convenient to them.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Ruislip, Northwood and Pinner more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Nick Hurd more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-06T17:40:42.207Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-06T17:40:42.207Z
star this property answering member
1561
star this property label Biography information for Mr Nick Hurd more like this
star this property tabling member
4653
unstar this property label Biography information for Stephen Morgan more like this
1050382
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 1 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Home Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Home Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Action Fraud more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many investigations resulting from information being passed to the police by Action Fraud have taken place in each year since 2013. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Blackpool South more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Gordon Marsden more like this
star this property uin 213951 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-05more like thismore than 2019-02-05
star this property answer text <p>Action Fraud reports are passed on to the National Fraud Intelligence Bureau (NFIB), who are responsible for reviewing and allocating offences to forces for investigation.</p><p><br>The Home Office collects information on the number of fraud cases disseminated by the NFIB to police forces and also the number of fraud outcomes recorded by the police. These data are published annually as part of the Home Office’s ‘Crime Outcomes in England and Wales’ publication. The latest data can be found here:</p><p><a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/740625/prc-fraud-open-data-march2018-tables.ods." target="_blank">https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/740625/prc-fraud-open-data-march2018-tables.ods.</a></p><p>In order to improve our understanding of how forces are responding to fraud, we, last year, asked HMIC to inspect forces. We will study the report when it is published.</p><p> </p>
star this property answering member constituency Wyre and Preston North more like this
star this property answering member printed Mr Ben Wallace more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-05T16:21:58.367Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-05T16:21:58.367Z
star this property answering member
1539
star this property label Biography information for Mr Ben Wallace more like this
star this property tabling member
465
unstar this property label Biography information for Gordon Marsden more like this
1050411
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept id 16 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Foreign and Commonwealth Office more like this
star this property hansard heading Africa: Diplomatic Relations more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of climate change on the UK's diplomatic relations with African countries. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency North East Fife more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Stephen Gethins more like this
star this property uin 214054 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-06more like thismore than 2019-02-06
star this property answer text <p>The effects of Climate Change are already being felt across Asia and Africa, affecting those least responsible most severely. These effects will worsen over time and are for some already existential. To tackle this challenge, the UK is already engaging with countries and regions across both continents, including at a sub-national level, taking into account wide variations in economic development, emissions trajectory and climate change vulnerability. There is no doubt, however, that more must be done to deepen our mutual understanding and our practical and diplomatic cooperation with both regions to succeed. This is why the government, including through the £5.8bn of International Climate Finance, and relevant Prosperity Fund programmes, as well as many UK businesses and non-government bodies, is working with countries in Asia and Africa to increase their reliance to climate change, reduce emissions, and transition to a sustainable low carbon economy.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Cities of London and Westminster more like this
star this property answering member printed Mark Field more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 214053 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-06T15:41:43.277Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-06T15:41:43.277Z
star this property answering member
1405
star this property label Biography information for Mark Field more like this
star this property tabling member
4434
unstar this property label Biography information for Stephen Gethins more like this
1050147
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Agricultural Products: Import Duties more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of lowering import tariffs on agricultural products on the domestic food and drink industry in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Bootle more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Peter Dowd more like this
star this property uin 213404 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-05more like thismore than 2019-02-05
star this property answer text <p>In the event the UK leaves the EU without a deal, there would be a number of tools available to help mitigate adverse impacts for the food and drink industry, as well as for consumers and producers. These tools could include lowering applied tariffs on certain goods, alongside tariff rate suspensions and opening up autonomous tariff rate quotas.</p><p> </p><p>Different combinations of these tools would have different impacts on the food and drink industry, as would different degrees of tariff reduction. In addition, the competitiveness of the domestic industry is heavily affected by a number of other factors, including commodity prices, exchange rates and oil prices. These drivers will continue to apply when we leave the EU, regardless of tariff rates.</p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Macclesfield more like this
star this property answering member printed David Rutley more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-05T17:30:36.423Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-05T17:30:36.423Z
star this property answering member
4033
star this property label Biography information for David Rutley more like this
star this property tabling member
4397
unstar this property label Biography information for Peter Dowd more like this
1050413
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Air Pollution more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether (a) his Department, (b) Public Health England and (c) the Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants have (i) made, (ii) commissioned and (iii) received assessments on the comparative levels of toxicity of (A) PM 0.1, (B) PM1 and (C) PM2.5 from different sources of emissions. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Stroud more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr David Drew more like this
star this property uin 213913 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-06more like thismore than 2019-02-06
star this property answer text <p>Recent assessments have been undertaken of the health effects of long-term exposure to the air pollution mixture in the United Kingdom. This was based on studies reporting associations of mortality risk with fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which includes PM1 and PM0.1, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2), available to view at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nitrogen-dioxide-effects-on-mortality" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nitrogen-dioxide-effects-on-mortality</a></p><p> </p><p>The Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) advised that, although it is unlikely that all components of particulate matter have the same potency in causing health effects, the available evidence is insufficient to allow further quantification. The COMEAP report can be viewed at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/particulate-air-pollution-health-effects-of-exposure" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/particulate-air-pollution-health-effects-of-exposure</a></p><p> </p><p>Reviews by the Health Effects Institute and World Health Organization concluded that there is currently limited evidence on the effects on health of ultrafine particles (PM0.1). These reviews can be viewed at the following links:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.healtheffects.org/publication/understanding-health-effects-ambient-ultrafine-particles" target="_blank">https://www.healtheffects.org/publication/understanding-health-effects-ambient-ultrafine-particles</a></p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/193108/REVIHAAP-Final-technical-report-final-version.pdf?ua=1" target="_blank">http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/193108/REVIHAAP-Final-technical-report-final-version.pdf?ua=1</a></p><p> </p><p>Public Health England has no plans to engage in work on the comparative levels of toxicity of PM0.1, PM1 and PM2.5 from different sources of emissions.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-06T14:58:17.14Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-06T14:58:17.14Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
252
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr David Drew more like this
1050414
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept id 13 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Environment, Food and Rural Affairs more like this
star this property hansard heading Air Pollution more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, for what reasons the Clean Air Strategy 2018 does not discuss PM1 and PM0.1; and what evidence his Department has on the safety to human health of (a) those particles and (b) urban air quality. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Stroud more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr David Drew more like this
star this property uin 213914 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-04more like thismore than 2019-02-04
star this property answer text <p>The Clean Air Strategy 2019 sets out our proposals for meeting our legally binding emissions ceilings for five key pollutants – fine particulate matter (PM<sub>2.5</sub>), nitrogen oxides (NO<sub>x</sub>), sulphur dioxide (SO<sub>2</sub>), ammonia (NH<sub>3</sub>) and non-methane volatile organic compounds.</p><p> </p><p>The pollutant with the strongest evidence for impacts on human health is PM<sub>2.5</sub>. Many of the sources of PM<sub>2.5</sub> are also responsible for PM<sub>1</sub> and PM<sub>0.1</sub>, and so our actions to reduce emissions of fine particulate matter will have positive benefits for the emissions of even smaller particles. The other four pollutants also often undergo chemical reactions in the air, becoming PM<sub>1</sub> or PM<sub>0.1</sub> particles. The reductions in the emissions of these pollutants will result in less pollution to undergo these reactions, and therefore fewer PM<sub>1</sub> or PM<sub>0.1</sub> particles formed in the air.</p><p> </p><p>a) While we have not made an assessment of the impact on health of PM<sub>1</sub>, the independent Air Quality Expert Group published a report into PM<sub>0.1</sub> particles (known as ultrafine particulate matter) which is available on Defra’s UK-AIR website.</p><p> </p><p>b) Defra does not report on the health effects of urban air quality specifically, but we do carry out assessments of air quality nationally. The quality of our air is improving nationwide, with lower emissions and lower concentrations, and much of the decrease in emissions has been in urban areas. Our Clean Air Strategy is emission-source focused, and as urban areas are often where there are most sources, these are the areas that will experience the biggest benefits from the Strategy.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Suffolk Coastal more like this
star this property answering member printed Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-04T17:46:56.367Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-04T17:46:56.367Z
star this property answering member
4098
star this property label Biography information for Dr Thérèse Coffey more like this
star this property tabling member
252
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr David Drew more like this
1050416
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Air Pollution more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 16 January 2019 to Question 206215 on Air Pollution, if he will publish the evidence held by (a) his Department and (b) Public Health England of the effect on human health of ultrafine particles (i) PM0.1 and (ii) PM1. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Stroud more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr David Drew more like this
star this property uin 213916 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-06more like thismore than 2019-02-06
star this property answer text <p>Recent assessments have been undertaken of the health effects of long-term exposure to the air pollution mixture in the United Kingdom. This was based on studies reporting associations of mortality risk with fine particulate matter (PM2.5), which includes PM1 and PM0.1, and nitrogen dioxide (NO<sub>2</sub>), available to view at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nitrogen-dioxide-effects-on-mortality" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nitrogen-dioxide-effects-on-mortality</a></p><p> </p><p>Reviews by the Health Effects Institute and World Health Organization concluded that there is currently limited evidence on the effects on health of ultrafine particles (PM0.1). These reviews can be viewed at the following links:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.healtheffects.org/publication/understanding-health-effects-ambient-ultrafine-particles" target="_blank">https://www.healtheffects.org/publication/understanding-health-effects-ambient-ultrafine-particles</a></p><p> </p><p><a href="http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/193108/REVIHAAP-Final-technical-report-final-version.pdf?ua=1" target="_blank">http://www.euro.who.int/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/193108/REVIHAAP-Final-technical-report-final-version.pdf?ua=1</a></p><p> </p><p>Public Health England has no plans to engage in work on the effects of PM1 and PM0.1 particles on human health.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-06T15:20:40.737Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-06T15:20:40.737Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
252
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr David Drew more like this
1050417
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date remove filter
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property hansard heading Air Pollution more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to his Answer of 16 January 2019 to Question 206215 pn Air Pollution, if he will direct Public Health England to make an assessment of the effect on respiratory and cardiovascular health of exposure to ultrafine particles (a) in and (b) outside the vicinity of waste incinerators. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Stroud more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Dr David Drew more like this
star this property uin 213917 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
unstar this property date of answer less than 2019-02-06more like thismore than 2019-02-06
star this property answer text <p>Assessments of the risks of pollutants to health are informed by the weight of the available evidence, rather than being undertaken on the basis of an individual study.</p><p> </p><p>Public Health England (PHE) funded a study to further extend the evidence base as to whether emissions from modern municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) affect human health. Study outputs concluded that the amount of particulate matter people are exposed to from municipal waste incinerators emissions is very low in Great Britain. The document can be viewed at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.6b06478" target="_blank">http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/acs.est.6b06478</a></p><p> </p><p>When consulted, PHE provides an expert and independent opinion to the regulator, the Environment Agency, on the potential impacts, including from particulate matter, on human health of emissions arising from existing or proposed regulated facilities, such as MWIs.</p><p> </p><p>PHE’s position is that well run and regulated modern MWIs are not a significant risk to public health. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact that modern MWIs make a small contribution to local concentrations of air pollutants. This document can be viewed at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/municipal-waste-incinerator-emissions-to-air-impact-on-health" target="_blank">https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/municipal-waste-incinerator-emissions-to-air-impact-on-health</a></p><p> </p><p>PHE has no plans to engage in work on the effects of ultrafine particles on respiratory and cardiovascular disease in and outside the vicinity of waste incinerators.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Winchester more like this
star this property answering member printed Steve Brine more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 213918 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-02-06T15:22:51.817Zmore like thismore than 2019-02-06T15:22:51.817Z
star this property answering member
4067
star this property label Biography information for Steve Brine more like this
star this property tabling member
252
unstar this property label Biography information for Dr David Drew more like this