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1136363
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-02more like thismore than 2019-07-02
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Genomic Healthcare Strategy will include all types of cancer. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Scunthorpe more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nic Dakin more like this
star this property uin 272220 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-10more like thismore than 2019-07-10
star this property answer text <p>Whole Genome Sequencing (WGS) of cancer was a key part of the 100,000 Genomes Project and from 2019 the National Health Service will begin to offer WGS as part of clinical care for people with specific types of cancer, for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS: sarcoma, and acute myeloid leukaemia (AML), and children with cancer.</p><p>The Government is committed to making the United Kingdom home of genomic healthcare and the National Genomic Healthcare Strategy, which we plan to launch in autumn 2019, will set out how the genomics community can work together to make the UK the global leader. The strategy will look at how genomic analysis at system-wide level can continue to be optimised for the benefit of UK patients with a range of conditions, including cancer, but it will not seek to focus in each type of cancer individually.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-10T16:20:23.703Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-10T16:20:23.703Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
4056
star this property label Biography information for Nic Dakin more like this
1136382
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-02more like thismore than 2019-07-02
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what cancer types will be offered whole genome sequencing through the Genomic Medicine Service as part of routine care in the next five years. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wolverhampton South West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Eleanor Smith more like this
star this property uin 272297 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-10more like thismore than 2019-07-10
star this property answer text <p>As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.</p><p>During 2019, whole genome sequencing will be available as part of routine NHS clinical care for some patients with rare disease and cancer, where there is evidence that it is clinically effective. The conditions are outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory which specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test. This is available at the following link:</p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p><p> </p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency South Ribble more like this
star this property answering member printed Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-10T11:03:30.713Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-10T11:03:30.713Z
star this property answering member
4455
star this property label Biography information for Seema Kennedy more like this
star this property tabling member
4609
star this property label Biography information for Eleanor Smith more like this
1136383
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-02more like thismore than 2019-07-02
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to consult with charities and patient organisations on whole genome sequencing. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Wolverhampton South West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Eleanor Smith more like this
star this property uin 272298 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-10more like thismore than 2019-07-10
star this property answer text <p>Genomics England has consulted charities, patient groups and participants from the 100,000 Genomes Project during the development of consent materials for the use of data from whole genome sequencing in research. Genomics England has also engaged with and sought input from charities and participants as it explores how best to realise the ambition to sequence five million genomes.</p><p>The NHS Genomic Medicine Centres established by NHS England to support the delivery of the 100,000 Genomes project have engaged with patients, the public and the independent sector. In addition, as part of the development of the NHS Genomic Medicine Service, NHS England is working with charities and patient organisation to help develop patient facing materials and information that will be used to support the introduction of whole genome sequencing in the National Health Service.</p><p>The Government is committed to making the United Kingdom home of genomic healthcare and the National Genomic Healthcare Strategy, which we plan to launch in autumn 2019, will set out how the genomics community can work together to make the UK the global leader. The Government is consulting widely - including with charities and patient organisations - in the development of the National Genomics Healthcare Strategy.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-10T16:22:39.927Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-10T16:22:39.927Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
4609
star this property label Biography information for Eleanor Smith more like this
1135182
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which diagnostic tests will whole genome sequencing replace, particularly for blood cancers. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270281 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270282 more like this
270283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.73Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.73Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1135183
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Genomic Test Directory directly replaces the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270282 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270281 more like this
270283 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.807Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.807Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1135184
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-27more like thismore than 2019-06-27
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how will new tests be added to the National Genomic Test Directory. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Sheffield South East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mr Clive Betts more like this
star this property uin 270283 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>During 2019, the National Health Service will begin to offer whole genome sequencing (WGS) as part of clinical care for:</p><p>- Seriously ill children likely to have a rare genetic disorder;</p><p>- People with one of 21 rare conditions where current evidence supports early adoption of WGS as a diagnostic test; and</p><p>- People with specific types of cancer for which there is likely to be the greatest patient benefit from using WGS – children with cancer, sarcoma and acute myeloid leukaemia.</p><p> </p><p>WGS will only replace existing diagnostic tests once the testing is demonstrated to be clinically safe to replace existing diagnostic testing. Initially, existing diagnostic testing will continue to be performed alongside WGS testing where clinically appropriate. This will continue until WGS is able to fully support clinical decision making within clinically appropriate timescales.</p><p>Current testing for blood cancers includes a number of diagnostic tests, the current expectation is that WGS will not be used to replace tests that require very fast turnaround times (under 24 hours) or high sensitivity.</p><p>WGS and non-WGS testing that will be available as part of clinical care is outlined in the National Genomic Test Directory at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>The UK Genetic Testing Network (UKGTN) published the NHS Directory of Genetic Disorders/Genes for Diagnostic Testing, which evaluated and recommended genetic tests for rare and inherited disorders for the National Health Service across the UK. However, there was not an equivalent for cancer genomic testing. The National Genomic Test Directory specifies which genomic tests are commissioned by the NHS in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test.</p><p>The National Genomic Test Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as WGS. As the price of WGS falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients.</p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p><p><strong> </strong></p>
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
270281 more like this
270282 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.857Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:24:02.857Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
394
star this property label Biography information for Mr Clive Betts more like this
1134871
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to provide training for NHS staff on whole genome sequencing. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Crawley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Henry Smith more like this
star this property uin 269709 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.</p><p>To deliver this, NHS England is working closely with the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs to monitor the workforce plans that are being put in place to support the delivery of the whole genome sequencing (WGS) service. This will continue after the service has launched as part of ongoing monitoring.</p><p>Health Education England established the Genomics Education Programme to support NHS staff to build the knowledge, skills and experience to deliver a WGS service. This programme is being embedded into organisations to enable long term sustainability of the multi-disciplinary, clinical workforce.</p><p><strong> </strong></p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 269710 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T11:49:13.347Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T11:49:13.347Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
3960
star this property label Biography information for Henry Smith more like this
1134872
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many additional NHS staff will be required to provide the Genomic Medicine Service. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Crawley more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Henry Smith more like this
star this property uin 269710 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>As part of the NHS Long Term Plan, the National Health Service has committed to sequencing 500,000 whole genomes by 2023/24.</p><p>To deliver this, NHS England is working closely with the NHS Genomic Laboratory Hubs to monitor the workforce plans that are being put in place to support the delivery of the whole genome sequencing (WGS) service. This will continue after the service has launched as part of ongoing monitoring.</p><p>Health Education England established the Genomics Education Programme to support NHS staff to build the knowledge, skills and experience to deliver a WGS service. This programme is being embedded into organisations to enable long term sustainability of the multi-disciplinary, clinical workforce.</p><p><strong> </strong></p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN 269709 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T11:49:13.3Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T11:49:13.3Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
3960
star this property label Biography information for Henry Smith more like this
1134875
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, who will hold responsibility for adding new tests to the National Genomic Test Directory. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Scunthorpe more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nic Dakin more like this
star this property uin 269720 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>The National Genomic Test Directory outlines which genomic tests are commissioned by the National Health Service in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test. The Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as whole genome sequencing. As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients. More information on the Directory is available at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>There is considerable variation in the reported costs of genomic analysis. For Genomics England, during the 100,000 Genomes project, these were in order of £2,500 per cancer patient. This included sequencing both the patient’s normal genome and their tumour, as well as the running costs of undertaking both the sequencing and bioinformatics for analysis and interpretation.</p><p>Health Education England established the Genomics Education Programme to support NHS staff to build the knowledge, skills and experience to deliver a whole genome sequencing service. This programme is being embedded into organisations to enable long-term sustainability of the multi-disciplinary clinical workforce.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p>
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
269721 more like this
269722 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:26:34.913Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:26:34.913Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
4056
star this property label Biography information for Nic Dakin more like this
1134876
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-06-26more like thismore than 2019-06-26
star this property answering body
Department of Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept id 17 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Health and Social Care more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Health and Social Care more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Genetics: Screening remove filter
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the cost is of a single whole genome sequencing test for (a) blood cancers and (b) other cancer types. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Scunthorpe more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Nic Dakin more like this
star this property uin 269721 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-05more like thismore than 2019-07-05
star this property answer text <p>The National Genomic Test Directory outlines which genomic tests are commissioned by the National Health Service in England, the technology by which they are available, and the patients who will be eligible to access to a test. The Directory will be updated on an annual basis and NHS England will implement a clear and transparent process, supported by a Clinical and Scientific Expert Panel, to determine which tests are available within the NHS. This will include reviewing any tests that may be retired or replaced by more modern technology, such as whole genome sequencing. As the price of whole genome sequencing falls and the clinical evidence improves, we envisage that it will be extended to more conditions and therefore more patients. More information on the Directory is available at the following link:</p><p> </p><p><a href="https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/" target="_blank">https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/national-genomic-test-directories/</a></p><p> </p><p>There is considerable variation in the reported costs of genomic analysis. For Genomics England, during the 100,000 Genomes project, these were in order of £2,500 per cancer patient. This included sequencing both the patient’s normal genome and their tumour, as well as the running costs of undertaking both the sequencing and bioinformatics for analysis and interpretation.</p><p>Health Education England established the Genomics Education Programme to support NHS staff to build the knowledge, skills and experience to deliver a whole genome sequencing service. This programme is being embedded into organisations to enable long-term sustainability of the multi-disciplinary clinical workforce.</p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p> </p><p><strong> </strong></p>
star this property answering member constituency Gosport more like this
star this property answering member printed Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
269720 more like this
269722 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-05T09:26:34.96Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-05T09:26:34.96Z
star this property answering member
4008
star this property label Biography information for Caroline Dinenage more like this
star this property tabling member
4056
star this property label Biography information for Nic Dakin more like this