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1135685
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-01more like thismore than 2019-07-01
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Income Tax: Pensioners more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what percentage of pensioners paid tax at (1) the 40 per cent, and (2) the 45 per cent, rate in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL16778 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-15more like thismore than 2019-07-15
star this property answer text <p>For this answer pensioners have been defined as those over State Pension Age (SPA). The definition used is consistent with average SPAs from HMRC’s published Income Tax Liabilities Statistics. The average female SPA for the purposes of this are 63.75 years in 2016-17 and 64.5 years in 2017-18 (the male SPA is 65 in both). The average male and female SPA in 2018-19 is 65.25.</p><p> </p><p>i)</p><p>Estimates of the number of pensioners who had tax liabilities at the 40% and 45% rates of income tax:</p><p> </p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>40%</p></td><td><p>537</p></td><td><p>514</p></td><td><p>508</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>45%</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>35</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>i)</p><p>Estimates of the number of pensioners who had an annual income above £50,000 as:</p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Male</p></td><td><p>311</p></td><td><p>342</p></td><td><p>361</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Female</p></td><td><p>107</p></td><td><p>110</p></td><td><p>113</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Total</p></td><td><p>418</p></td><td><p>451</p></td><td><p>474</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>ii)</p><p>Of these pensioners with income above £50,000, the age ranges are:</p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>60-64</p></td><td><p>9</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>65-69</p></td><td><p>170</p></td><td><p>171</p></td><td><p>170</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>70-74</p></td><td><p>108</p></td><td><p>131</p></td><td><p>145</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>75+</p></td><td><p>131</p></td><td><p>143</p></td><td><p>158</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The number of 60-64 year old Pensioners reduces to zero by 2018-19 reflecting the increasing SPA for females over the time period shown.</p><p> </p><p>The figures for 2016-17 are based on the latest outturn data from the Survey of Personal Incomes (SPI), 2017-18 and 2018-19 are projections based on the 2016-17 SPI, which are projected using economic assumptions consistent with the Office for Budget Responsibility’s (OBR) March 2019 Economic and Fiscal Outlook.</p><p> </p><p>For comparison to the total population of pensioners, Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimates of the population of the UK give the number of individuals by age. The number of pensioners in the UK can also be estimated using the average state pension age in each tax year:</p><p> </p><p>12.3 million in 2016-17</p><p>12.2 million in 2017-18</p><p>12.0 million in 2018-19</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL16779 more like this
HL16863 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-15T16:39:10.563Zmore like thisremove minimum value filter
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
1135686
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-01more like thismore than 2019-07-01
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Personal Income: Pensioners more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what is (1) the total number, and (2) the percentage, of pensioners who had an annual income above £50,000 in each of the last three years; and whether they have a gender breakdown for those data. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL16779 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-15more like thismore than 2019-07-15
star this property answer text <p>For this answer pensioners have been defined as those over State Pension Age (SPA). The definition used is consistent with average SPAs from HMRC’s published Income Tax Liabilities Statistics. The average female SPA for the purposes of this are 63.75 years in 2016-17 and 64.5 years in 2017-18 (the male SPA is 65 in both). The average male and female SPA in 2018-19 is 65.25.</p><p> </p><p>i)</p><p>Estimates of the number of pensioners who had tax liabilities at the 40% and 45% rates of income tax:</p><p> </p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>40%</p></td><td><p>537</p></td><td><p>514</p></td><td><p>508</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>45%</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>35</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>i)</p><p>Estimates of the number of pensioners who had an annual income above £50,000 as:</p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Male</p></td><td><p>311</p></td><td><p>342</p></td><td><p>361</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Female</p></td><td><p>107</p></td><td><p>110</p></td><td><p>113</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Total</p></td><td><p>418</p></td><td><p>451</p></td><td><p>474</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>ii)</p><p>Of these pensioners with income above £50,000, the age ranges are:</p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>60-64</p></td><td><p>9</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>65-69</p></td><td><p>170</p></td><td><p>171</p></td><td><p>170</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>70-74</p></td><td><p>108</p></td><td><p>131</p></td><td><p>145</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>75+</p></td><td><p>131</p></td><td><p>143</p></td><td><p>158</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The number of 60-64 year old Pensioners reduces to zero by 2018-19 reflecting the increasing SPA for females over the time period shown.</p><p> </p><p>The figures for 2016-17 are based on the latest outturn data from the Survey of Personal Incomes (SPI), 2017-18 and 2018-19 are projections based on the 2016-17 SPI, which are projected using economic assumptions consistent with the Office for Budget Responsibility’s (OBR) March 2019 Economic and Fiscal Outlook.</p><p> </p><p>For comparison to the total population of pensioners, Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimates of the population of the UK give the number of individuals by age. The number of pensioners in the UK can also be estimated using the average state pension age in each tax year:</p><p> </p><p>12.3 million in 2016-17</p><p>12.2 million in 2017-18</p><p>12.0 million in 2018-19</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL16778 more like this
HL16863 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-15T16:39:10.613Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-15T16:39:10.613Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
1136413
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-02more like thismore than 2019-07-02
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Personal Income: Pensioners more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the number and percentage of pensioners with annual incomes above £50,000, broken down by age, in each of the last three years. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL16863 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-15more like thismore than 2019-07-15
star this property answer text <p>For this answer pensioners have been defined as those over State Pension Age (SPA). The definition used is consistent with average SPAs from HMRC’s published Income Tax Liabilities Statistics. The average female SPA for the purposes of this are 63.75 years in 2016-17 and 64.5 years in 2017-18 (the male SPA is 65 in both). The average male and female SPA in 2018-19 is 65.25.</p><p> </p><p>i)</p><p>Estimates of the number of pensioners who had tax liabilities at the 40% and 45% rates of income tax:</p><p> </p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>40%</p></td><td><p>537</p></td><td><p>514</p></td><td><p>508</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>45%</p></td><td><p>34</p></td><td><p>35</p></td><td><p>37</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>i)</p><p>Estimates of the number of pensioners who had an annual income above £50,000 as:</p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Male</p></td><td><p>311</p></td><td><p>342</p></td><td><p>361</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Female</p></td><td><p>107</p></td><td><p>110</p></td><td><p>113</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>Total</p></td><td><p>418</p></td><td><p>451</p></td><td><p>474</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>ii)</p><p>Of these pensioners with income above £50,000, the age ranges are:</p><p>Numbers: thousands</p><table><tbody><tr><td><p> </p></td><td><p>2016-17</p></td><td><p>2017-18</p></td><td><p>2018-19</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>60-64</p></td><td><p>9</p></td><td><p>5</p></td><td><p> </p></td></tr><tr><td><p>65-69</p></td><td><p>170</p></td><td><p>171</p></td><td><p>170</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>70-74</p></td><td><p>108</p></td><td><p>131</p></td><td><p>145</p></td></tr><tr><td><p>75+</p></td><td><p>131</p></td><td><p>143</p></td><td><p>158</p></td></tr></tbody></table><p> </p><p>The number of 60-64 year old Pensioners reduces to zero by 2018-19 reflecting the increasing SPA for females over the time period shown.</p><p> </p><p>The figures for 2016-17 are based on the latest outturn data from the Survey of Personal Incomes (SPI), 2017-18 and 2018-19 are projections based on the 2016-17 SPI, which are projected using economic assumptions consistent with the Office for Budget Responsibility’s (OBR) March 2019 Economic and Fiscal Outlook.</p><p> </p><p>For comparison to the total population of pensioners, Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimates of the population of the UK give the number of individuals by age. The number of pensioners in the UK can also be estimated using the average state pension age in each tax year:</p><p> </p><p>12.3 million in 2016-17</p><p>12.2 million in 2017-18</p><p>12.0 million in 2018-19</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL16778 more like this
HL16779 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-15T16:39:10.643Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-15T16:39:10.643Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
1142431
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-25more like thismore than 2019-07-25
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Taxation: Electronic Government more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to continue with the rollout of their Simple Assessment and dynamic coding projects, which were paused in May 2018. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL17505 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text <p>HM Revenue &amp; Customs (HMRC) delivered Simple Assessment to a small number of customers in 2017. Due to the need to prioritise EU exit, HMRC temporarily suspended further work to extend the service to a larger number of customers. The service remains active for the original user base, and further enhancements are being made this financial year. HMRC are reviewing whether to make further investments into the service in the context of the Spending Review.</p><p> </p><p>HMRC have long had a delivery plan for the dynamic coding-out of debt project. The service was successfully introduced for a number of taxation scenarios that cause an over- or under-payment of PAYE.</p><p> </p><p>After the closure of the Making Tax Digital for Individuals Programme, which included a wider dynamic coding option, and resource reallocation to EU exit, a new IT solution was required for this Budget 2017 project. HMRC remain committed to delivering this project. Further work on the wider dynamic coding activities will be considered as part of wider Spending Review planning.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T14:08:44.993Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T14:08:44.993Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
1142433
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-25more like thismore than 2019-07-25
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading PAYE more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the use of Real Time Information (RTI) to ensure low earners receive the tax relief they are due; and what plans they have to require all employers to use RTI. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Altmann more like this
star this property uin HL17507 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text <p>Information filed by employers through RTI is applied equally to all relevant customer records. HM Revenue &amp; Customs (HMRC) do not make a distinction between low and high earners when applying rules within tax calculations.</p><p> </p><p>Employers who pay all of their employees under the Lower Earnings Limit for National Insurance Contributions (NICs) and have no tax deducted are not required to register with HMRC. The employer is not required to report information to HMRC until there is a tax or NICs deduction payable to HMRC.</p><p> </p><p>There are no plans to mandate employers who pay small amounts of wages to all of their employees to register with HMRC.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T13:38:40.563Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T13:38:40.563Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4533
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Altmann more like this
1141516
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-23more like thismore than 2019-07-23
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Insolvency more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact that the proposal to make HMRC a secondary preferential creditor in insolvencies may have on business rescue support in the UK from April 2020. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
star this property uin HL17384 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text <p>This reform is designed to ensure that when a business becomes insolvent, more of the taxes paid in good faith by that business’s employees and customers will go to fund public services as intended, rather than being distributed to other creditors such as financial institutions.</p><p>This measure does not include a cap on the age of tax debts which will be eligible for secondary preferential status, nor an exemption for existing lending. Either proposal would introduce potential distortions into the lending market which the Government does not consider to be either fair or proportionate.</p><p>The Government does not expect this reform to have a significant impact on access to finance, the cost of borrowing, business rescue support in the UK or the UK’s ranking in the World Bank’s annual “Doing Business” report.</p><p>Consistent with the Government’s impact assessment, the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) did not make any adjustments to their economic forecast in response to this measure.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL17385 more like this
HL17386 more like this
HL17387 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.673Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.673Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
1567
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
1141517
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-23more like thismore than 2019-07-23
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Insolvency more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact that their proposal to make HMRC a secondary preferential creditor in insolvencies will have on the UK’s ranking in the World Bank’s annual "Doing Business" report. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
star this property uin HL17385 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text <p>This reform is designed to ensure that when a business becomes insolvent, more of the taxes paid in good faith by that business’s employees and customers will go to fund public services as intended, rather than being distributed to other creditors such as financial institutions.</p><p>This measure does not include a cap on the age of tax debts which will be eligible for secondary preferential status, nor an exemption for existing lending. Either proposal would introduce potential distortions into the lending market which the Government does not consider to be either fair or proportionate.</p><p>The Government does not expect this reform to have a significant impact on access to finance, the cost of borrowing, business rescue support in the UK or the UK’s ranking in the World Bank’s annual “Doing Business” report.</p><p>Consistent with the Government’s impact assessment, the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) did not make any adjustments to their economic forecast in response to this measure.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL17384 more like this
HL17386 more like this
HL17387 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.753Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.753Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
1567
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
1141518
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-23more like thismore than 2019-07-23
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Insolvency more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government why HM Treasury has decided to not introduce a cap on the age of tax debts which will be eligible for secondary preferential status in insolvencies from April 2020; and what assessment they have made of the impact of this decision on the costs of insolvency procedures and business lending. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
star this property uin HL17386 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text <p>This reform is designed to ensure that when a business becomes insolvent, more of the taxes paid in good faith by that business’s employees and customers will go to fund public services as intended, rather than being distributed to other creditors such as financial institutions.</p><p>This measure does not include a cap on the age of tax debts which will be eligible for secondary preferential status, nor an exemption for existing lending. Either proposal would introduce potential distortions into the lending market which the Government does not consider to be either fair or proportionate.</p><p>The Government does not expect this reform to have a significant impact on access to finance, the cost of borrowing, business rescue support in the UK or the UK’s ranking in the World Bank’s annual “Doing Business” report.</p><p>Consistent with the Government’s impact assessment, the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) did not make any adjustments to their economic forecast in response to this measure.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL17384 more like this
HL17385 more like this
HL17387 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.597Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.597Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
1567
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
1141519
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-23more like thismore than 2019-07-23
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Insolvency more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government why HM Treasury has decided that existing lending will not be exempted from their policy of making HMRC a secondary preferential creditor in insolvencies; and what assessment they have made of the impact of this decision on the continued availability of existing business lending. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
star this property uin HL17387 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-08-06more like thismore than 2019-08-06
star this property answer text <p>This reform is designed to ensure that when a business becomes insolvent, more of the taxes paid in good faith by that business’s employees and customers will go to fund public services as intended, rather than being distributed to other creditors such as financial institutions.</p><p>This measure does not include a cap on the age of tax debts which will be eligible for secondary preferential status, nor an exemption for existing lending. Either proposal would introduce potential distortions into the lending market which the Government does not consider to be either fair or proportionate.</p><p>The Government does not expect this reform to have a significant impact on access to finance, the cost of borrowing, business rescue support in the UK or the UK’s ranking in the World Bank’s annual “Doing Business” report.</p><p>Consistent with the Government’s impact assessment, the independent Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) did not make any adjustments to their economic forecast in response to this measure.</p>
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property grouped question UIN
HL17384 more like this
HL17385 more like this
HL17386 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.86Zmore like thismore than 2019-08-06T13:34:00.86Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
1567
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Burt of Solihull more like this
1140461
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-07-18more like thismore than 2019-07-18
star this property answering body
Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept id 14 more like this
star this property answering dept short name Treasury more like this
star this property answering dept sort name Treasury more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Hotels: Taxation more like this
star this property house id 2 more like this
star this property legislature
25277
star this property pref label House of Lords more like this
star this property question text To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Bates on 2 April (HL14646), whether they will assess how a tax levied on hotel stays on a per night basis might affect cities and their tourism sectors; and if not, why not. more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Baroness Doocey more like this
star this property uin HL17294 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-07-23more like thismore than 2019-07-23
star this property answer text <p>The Chancellor keeps the tax system under review, but has no plans to introduce a tax levied on hotel stays on a per night basis. Therefore, no such assessment is planned.</p> more like this
star this property answering member printed Lord Young of Cookham remove filter
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-07-23T16:27:30.827Zmore like thismore than 2019-07-23T16:27:30.827Z
star this property answering member
57
star this property label Biography information for Lord Young of Cookham more like this
star this property tabling member
4197
star this property label Biography information for Baroness Doocey more like this