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674478
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-01-17more like thismore than 2017-01-17
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading House of Commons: Staff more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, how many House staff are nationals of an EU country other than the UK. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Westmorland and Lonsdale more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tim Farron more like this
star this property uin 60497 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-01-23more like thismore than 2017-01-23
star this property answer text <p>For the purpose of security clearance all staff have to declare a nationality. The Pass Office database shows that the House of Commons including bi-cameral departments holds security clearance and passes for a total of 2,653 staff. 153 of these have declared a nationality of an EU country other than the UK. This equates to 5.77%.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-01-23T10:36:53.94Zmore like thismore than 2017-01-23T10:36:53.94Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1591
star this property label Biography information for Tim Farron more like this
1104848
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2019-03-25more like thismore than 2019-03-25
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Members: ICT more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what assessment has been made of the success of the roll-out of updated IT equipment for Members and their staff, to enable them to work as efficiently as possible in responding to, and resolving, constituents’ cases. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency West Lancashire more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Rosie Cooper more like this
star this property uin 236428 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2019-03-28more like thismore than 2019-03-28
star this property answer text <p>The Commons Members Hardware Refresh project is upgrading all hardware loaned to Members returned at the 2017 General Election. Hardware will be upgraded to more up to date kit with Windows 10 deployed, which is faster and more secure. Combined with the rollout of digital tools such as Office 365, SharePoint and Skype for Business, this means easier collaboration on constituency matters and new ways of working between Westminster and constituency offices and staff.<br></p><p>Since November 2018, 725 orders for new kit have been processed and 438 deployments completed across Westminster and in constituencies. The project is on track to complete by the end of July 2019.</p> more like this
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2019-03-28T14:12:51.317Zmore like thismore than 2019-03-28T14:12:51.317Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1538
star this property label Biography information for Rosie Cooper more like this
767631
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2017-10-09more like thismore than 2017-10-09
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Parliament: Broadband more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the right hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington, representing the House of Commons Commission, what the average broadband download speed is on the Parliamentary estate. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency West Bromwich East more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Tom Watson more like this
star this property uin 106531 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2017-10-12more like thismore than 2017-10-12
star this property answer text <p>The Parliamentary Estate provides users with a number of different broadband solutions with varying bandwidth based on usage and capacity requirements. These are listed below:</p><ul><li>Parliament’s main secure private network (PN) resilient internet connection = 2Gbps bandwidth</li><li>The secure ‘internet direct’ resilient wireless service = 400Mbps bandwidth</li><li>Broadband over a phone line = 5–7Mbps bandwidth</li></ul><p><br>The Digital Service takes action where possible to improve the broadband download speed across the Parliamentary Estate. However, due to the age and condition of the Palace of Westminster it is difficult to improve both the wiring that is available and to supplement the wireless connectivity.</p><p>The average download speeds on these services will vary as it depends on a number of factors such as the capability of the user’s device, the connection type (wired/wireless), the size of download, the current bandwidth utilisation on any given day and the volume of users/devices connected, as these internet services and bandwidths are shared with all users across the Parliamentary estate. Due to these factors, the Digital Service does not hold data relating to the average download speed.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2017-10-12T13:02:06.14Zmore like thismore than 2017-10-12T13:02:06.14Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1463
star this property label Biography information for Tom Watson more like this
424629
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, whether the Commission consulted (a) users and (b) makers of vellum on ending the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13882 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.217Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.217Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424630
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what alternative media for printing Acts of Parliament the Commission has considered. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13883 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.327Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.327Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424631
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate the Commission has made of the potential savings from ending the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament; and on what basis that estimate was made. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13884 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.437Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.437Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424632
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, how much the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament cost in each year since 1999. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13885 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.547Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.547Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424633
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what discussions the Commission has had with archival experts (a) within and (b) outside Parliament on ending the use of vellum for printing Acts of Parliament. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13880 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:58.883Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:58.883Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424634
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what advice the Commission has received on the comparative longevity of archival paper and vellum. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13881 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13957 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.117Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.117Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
424635
star this property registered interest false more like this
star this property date less than 2015-10-28more like thismore than 2015-10-28
star this property answering body
House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept id 18 more like this
star this property answering dept short name House of Commons Commission more like this
star this property answering dept sort name House of Commons Commission more like this
unstar this property hansard heading Acts: Publishing more like this
star this property house id 1 more like this
star this property legislature
25259
star this property pref label House of Commons more like this
star this property question text To ask the hon. Member for Carshalton and Wallington representing the House of Commons Commission, what estimate the Commission has made of the average cost of the reproduction of an Act of Parliament on archival paper once it has deteriorated. more like this
star this property tabling member constituency Washington and Sunderland West more like this
star this property tabling member printed
Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this
star this property uin 13957 more like this
star this property answer
answer
unstar this property is ministerial correction false more like this
star this property date of answer less than 2015-11-09more like thismore than 2015-11-09
star this property answer text <p>The House of Lords is responsible for the printing of two record copies of each Act, both printed on vellum in accordance with the Resolutions agreed by both Houses in February 1849. The Commission does not incur any expenditure on the printing of these copies, and has therefore undertaken no inquiry into, or consultation on, the proposal from the Chairman of Committees in the House of Lords to move to the use of archival paper. It has also therefore not sought to assess alternative options, nor undertaken any analysis of relative storage or care costs of vellum as opposed to archival paper. The House of Lords agreed in 1999 to vary its resolution and that vellum should cease to be used. The predecessor Administration Committee had considered arguments in support of a similar proposal from the House of Lords in June 1999. That Committee recommended in a report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm199899/cmselect/cmadmin/539/53903.htm" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 539</a>) to the House that the proposal to end the use of vellum be accepted. However, following a debate on 1 November 1999, on a motion that the Commons agree with the Lords in their resolution, the proposal was rejected by the Commons. [Deb HC: 1 November 1999, Col 32ff].</p><p>In his letter to the Administration Committee of 17 September, printed with the Committee’s Report (<a href="http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/cmselect/cmadmin/521/521.pdf" target="_blank"><em>Record Copies of Acts</em>, HC 521</a>), the Chairman of Committees stated that the average annual cost of printing vellums is around £100,000 a year. I understand that the current estimate of the savings arising from a switch to archival paper are about 80%, amounting to around £800,000 of savings to public funds over the next ten years. These arise from the greater ease of printing on paper rather than vellum, as well as the raw material costs. The exact level of savings to public funds will depend on the number of Acts passed, and number of pages per Act, per year, and the precise specification and contractual arrangements agreed for future printing. The Commission has made no assessment of the breakdown of savings arising.</p><p>The Chairman of Committees records in his letter the view that high quality archival paper would maintain durability and print quality. I understand that the National Archives has already informed Parliament that it does not require a vellum copy, and that it takes the view that archival quality paper is sufficient to maintain the public record. It also maintains a comprehensive database of legislation, both “as originally enacted” and “as amended”, on <a href="http://www.legislation.gov.uk" target="_blank">www.legislation.gov.uk</a>. Private Acts have been printed on archival paper since 1956. There are internationally recognised ISO standards for archival paper, and for archival quality ink and printing processes.</p>
star this property answering member constituency Carshalton and Wallington more like this
star this property answering member printed Tom Brake more like this
star this property grouped question UIN
13880 more like this
13881 more like this
13882 more like this
13883 more like this
13884 more like this
13885 more like this
13958 more like this
14164 more like this
star this property question first answered
less than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.74Zmore like thismore than 2015-11-09T11:47:59.74Z
star this property answering member
151
star this property label Biography information for Tom Brake remove filter
star this property tabling member
1521
star this property label Biography information for Mrs Sharon Hodgson more like this